CWUR 1-60

CWUR 1-60-005 Assistant Attorney General

The assistant attorney general is the assigned legal advisor to the university.

(1) Functions and Responsibilities. All functions and responsibilities are in accordance with the statutes of the state of Washington RCW 28B.10.510 and 43.10.060.

(A) Location and assignment. The assistant attorney general has an office at Central Washington University. Where special circumstances warrant it, the attorney general occasionally appoints a special assistant attorney general to perform special legal assignments on behalf of the university under the supervision of the attorney general’s office. The assistant attorney general(s) assigned to the university are directly responsible through the head of the education division or the labor and personnel division to the attorney general and his or her chief deputy.

(B) Responsibility. All legal matters pertaining to the university must be handled by the attorney general’s Central Washington University office in coordination with the chief of staff who is responsible for overall coordination with the assistant attorney generals and is to be included on all correspondence, issues, settlement discussions and decisions, or briefings.

(2) Coordination of interaction with the assistant attorney general. To minimize duplicative requests and to ensure coordination of issues that may be dealt with by various departments dealing with related issues or staff, information requested from the assistant attorney general is coordinated by the chief of staff (CofS). Requests for legal assistance should provide sufficient background information, along with a proposed timeline for a response. The following provides coordination of request for legal assistance and the coordinator who should determine whether or not to contact the chief of staff regarding the need for assistance from the assistant attorney general:
 

Issue Category Coordinator of Request to
Chief of Staff
Students, Staff & Faculty AVP Finance and Business
Auxiliaries/CFO
Environmental Health and
Safety, Workers’ Compensation
 
Students, Staff & Faculty AVP HR
Financial Aid Students AVP Finance and Business Auxiliaries / CFO
Human/Animal Subjects Human Subjects, Faculty, Staff & Students AVP Undergraduate / Provost
Labor, Employment, Immigration Faculty and Staff AVP HR
NCAA / GNAC Students & Staff Athletic Director
Business Services, Procurement Staff and Faculty Bus. Serv. Dir. / CFO
Information Systems, Technology Students, Staff & Faculty AVP ITS / CFO
Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Complaints against staff/faculty, title IX issues Students AVP HR
Discrimination, Affirmative Action, Ethics, Sexual Harassment, Whistleblower Staff & Faculty AVP HR
Campus Crime Staff, faculty, students Dir. CWU Police Services / CFO
Records Students Dean of Students /Provost
Records Staff and Faculty Records Mgmt / CFO / Provost
Property Management   AVP FMD / CFO
Academic & Research   Dean / AVP / Provost
Conflict of Interest Staff and Faculty AVP HR
Development & Fundraising Donors, Staff and Faculty Dir Univ. Adv.
Student Conduct & Housing Students Dean of Students / Provost

 (3) Personnel involved in legal processes related to university business

When any employee is served notice of a legal process related to university business, the following procedures should be implemented;

(A) Employee Responsibility. In any instance where a university employee is served a subpoena or other legal process related to university business, the employee should immediately inform the assistant attorney general’s office and the chief of staff of this fact. This procedure does not apply to cases where the relation of the employee to the legal proceeding is purely personal.

(B) Statutory authority. According to the statutes of the state of Washington, the board of trustees may authorize the attorney general to defend a claim, suit, or proceeding brought against an employee, officer, or agent of the university arising out of the performance or failure of performance for, or employment with, the university when such person requests through the chief of staff to the board to so authorize and when the board has determined that such person was acting in good faith. When such a request has been authorized, any obligation for payment arising from such action shall be paid from state funds as prescribed by statute.

(C) Request for defense. Whenever an employee of the university has a claim, suit, or proceeding brought against him/her which he/she believes arises out of his performance or failure of performance for, or employment with, the university and wants it defended by the attorney general, the employee should submit through his/her immediate supervisor and vice president a written request addressed to the board of trustees requesting the board to authorize the attorney general to provide such defense. The request is to be submitted to the chief of staff who will forward a copy of the request to the Central Washington University office of the attorney general. Such request should include a copy of the claim, complaint or other document asserting claim against the employee, a brief statement of the circumstances giving rise to the claim, and a statement by the employee evidencing that any actions on his/her part which might have given rise to the claim were taken in good faith. Such request should be made within 10 days after receipt by the employee of any written notice that a claim is being asserted against him/her.

(D) Investigation of request for defense. The first supervisory officer above the employee who has not had a claim asserted against him/her by the same claimant arising from the same circumstances shall investigate the matter to determine whether or not the employee was acting in good faith, and shall forward the results and recommendation of his/her investigation up through the supervisory chain to the vice president or chief of staff for review. The vice president will forward the request along with their recommendation to the chief of staff. The chief of staff, after review by the president, will present the request to the board of trustees together with a report from the attorney general and any reports and recommendations from supervising officers for the board’s action on the request.

(E) Interim action. The attorney general’s office shall take all necessary steps in the interim to protect the interest of the parties.

(F) Personal Consultation. The assistant attorney generals are not available for personal legal consultation.

[Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 08/03/2011; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-010 Serving Alcoholic Beverages

(1) Ellensburg Campus: 

This procedure is governed by the policy on alcohol and other drugs, CWUP 2-40-030, and applicable laws of the state of Washington. Alcoholic beverages and liquor are interchangeable terms and include beer, wine and distilled spirits. The service of alcoholic beverages on the university campus requires approval from the President’s Office as well as the appropriate permit or license from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board.

Requests to serve alcohol on the CWU Ellensburg campus using a banquet permit or seeking permission to use a licensed server must be received by the President’s Office and scheduling center at least TWO WEEKS PRIOR to the event. Certain areas of campus, including public spaces in residence halls and substance free residence halls, are designated as substance free areas and are not eligible for alcohol served events.

Requests to sell alcohol on the CWU Ellensburg campus using a special occasion license must be received by the President’s Office and scheduling center at least 60 DAYS PRIOR to the event.

If approved, information on how to apply online to the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Control Board for a banquet permit will be provided to the campus host or sponsoring organization.

Permits / Licenses

If alcohol is to be served, the sponsor will complete one of the following online forms:
 Banquet Permit Request: required in order to serve wine and beer (hosted event)
 Special Occasion License:  required in order to sell wine and beer (no-host event)
 Licensed Server Permission: required in order for a non-CWU, licensed business to sell alcoholic beverages at a public university event.

Such requests must be submitted within the time-frame noted on the forms. Requests will be forwarded to the President’s Office for review and approval. A letter authorizing the serving of alcoholic beverages on Ellensburg campus will be sent to the event sponsor and the scheduling center.

A banquet permit allows the service and consumption of liquor at a private, invitation-only banquet or gathering held in a public place or business where alcohol is provided at no cost to the attendees. Examples include weddings, company banquets, retirement parties, and club, organization or church events. You may purchase the banquet permit

A special occasion license allows a nonprofit organization to sell liquor at a specific time date and place. Examples include fundraising dinners, gala events, auctions and wine tastings. Requests for a special occasion license must be received by the president’s office and scheduling center NO LESS THAN 60 DAYS PRIOR to the event. If approved, the letter of approval must be sent by the sponsoring agent to the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Control Board AT LEAST 45 DAYS PRIOR to the event and include a check for the fee. For regulations and to apply for the permit, see details.

A licensed server permission letter allows an outside (non-CWU), legally-licensed business to sell alcoholic beverages at a public university event. The licensed server will possess all of the correct and necessary permits, giving them the liability to take all responsibility for alcohol service, including but not limited to ensuring all individuals who are served alcohol are age 21 or over and the server(s) will actively mitigate high-risk drinking. Examples where a licensed server may be used include receptions at museums and art galleries on campus. Licensed servers will provide their own liquor for sale. Costs related to this service may be paid by individual event attendees or the sponsoring department. Sponsoring departments may not collect revenue from this service. Requests to serve alcohol on the CWU Ellensburg campus must be received by the President’s Office and scheduling center at least TWO WEEKS PRIOR to the event.

All event sponsors will comply with security requirements as determined by the director of police services. A copy of the request to serve alcohol on CWU-Ellensburg campus will be sent by the scheduling center to the CWU Police Department to determine security needs. Failure to agree to meet the security requirements as determined by the director of police services will result in the denial of the request.

Any student club holding an event where alcohol will be served requires the staff or faculty sponsor of the club to submit the request for the approval letter and apply for the permit(s).

The Banquet Permit or Special Occasion License will be posted in plain view at the event the entire time alcohol is being consumed.

When alcohol is being served at a social event, the sponsoring group will provide nonalcoholic beverages and food.

Alcohol server training is available. It is recommended that all events be staffed by one or more designated individuals who have completed alcohol server training.

(2) University Centers - Faculty and staff located at a CWU University Center must coordinate any request for use of facilities and abide by any requirement of the community college where the University Center is located.

Any sponsoring organization that intends to serve alcoholic beverages on the CWU-Ellensburg campus must comply with all applicable Washington State liquor laws. Any personal or property damages that occur as a result of serving alcohol will be the responsibility of the event sponsor. Violations of this procedure or any applicable state law will result in sanctions and/or disciplinary action. For students, the Dean of Student Success will determine the appropriate sanction. Human Resources will work with the appropriate appointing authority when employees are involved. For external sponsoring organizations, the President’s Office will be notified.

[Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 4/4/2012; 10/7/2015; 6/1/16; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-020 Procedures, Criteria, and Nomination Forms for the Award of Honorary Degrees

CWUR 1-60-020 Procedures, Criteria, and Nomination Forms for the Award of Honorary Degrees

As authorized by CWUP 2-20-060, honorary degrees provide Central Washington University with a means to recognize individuals who have made significant contributions to the university over an extended period of time or whose outstanding personal or professional achievements and attainments exemplify the role and mission of the university. Typically, recipients of honorary degrees will have close connections to Central Washington University, either as graduates of the institution or as citizens who have rendered significant service to the institution. To preserve the integrity of the process, the award of honorary degrees should be justified on the basis of unusual and distinctive circumstances.

Honorary degrees that may be awarded are Master of Humane Letters (MHL), Master of Literature (M Lit), Master of Natural Science (MNS), and Master of Social Science (MSS) or Doctor of Humane Letters (DHL), Doctor of Literature (D Lit), Doctor of Natural Science (DNS) and Doctor of Social Science (DSS). Degrees earned as a result of completion of a program of study shall not be awarded as honorary degrees. 

Nominations for honorary degrees may be made by the following:
• Permanent employees of CWU
• Members of the Board of Trustees, the CWU Foundation Board, or the CWU Alumni Board


The Provost will appoint a faculty Ad Hoc Honorary Degree Committee by November 20 of each academic year to review and recommend action on honorary degree nominations.

The timeline for selection of honorary degree recipients is:

Due date Description
November 1 Faculty Senate Executive Committee submits a list of at least twelve tenured or tenure-track faculty names with representation from each college and the library to the Provost.
November 20 The Provost appoints an Ad Hoc Honorary Degree Selection Committee of five faculty members, one representing each college and the library, from the list of at least twelve names submitted by the Faculty Senate Executive Committee.
January 10

Honorary degree nominations are due to the President‘s office.
Nomination materials must include:
 Nomination form (attached)
• A curriculum vitae or comparably complete biographical information on the nominee
• Letters of recommendation, support or corroboration from colleagues, associates, students or relevant others (5 maximum).

January 15 The President’s Office forwards nomination materials to the Ad Hoc Honorary Degree Selection Committee.
February 1 Recommendations due from the Faculty Ad Hoc Honorary Degree Committee to the President of those nominees whom they unanimously endorsed for the award. Recommendations should be summarized in a single document.
February 15 The president will review the recommendations of the Faculty Ad Hoc Honorary Degree Committee and determine whether or not to forward the nominees to the Board of Trustees for consideration no later than the May meeting.


The president or his or her designee will notify selectees and will arrange activities surrounding actual granting of the degree and commemoration of the occasion.

[09/09; Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 01/06/2016; 08/03/2011; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-040 Naming Approval

(1) Approval to proceed for working names.

(A) Working names are assigned at the discretion of the vice president for operations

(B) The working name of a facility shall serve until a permanent name is proposed and approved.

(2) Approval to proceed for administrative names or major facilities.

(A) An administrative name may be proposed by a CWU employee with the submittal of a dossier through the administrative structure of a division, to the vice president.

(B) The dossier shall contain the following elements

1. A precise description of the facility to be named.

2. The exact name to be adopted.

3. The basis or reason for the naming, including why the proposed name is appropriate to the facility.

4. A description of the due diligence that has been performed in soliciting input on the naming proposal.

(C) The dossier may be recommended by the appropriate vice president to the president's executive leadership team for recommendation to the president, upon whose approval the facility may be named.

(3) Approval to proceed for commemorative names.

(A) For the commemorative naming of major facilities, all initial approaches to, or serious discussions with, a benefactor or representative of an individual to be memorialized must have the prior approval of the vice president of university advancement, the vice president associated with the facility, and the president.

(B) The purpose of preliminary approval is to ensure that the contemplated naming is likely to be consistent with university goals and priorities, with university and campus development plans, and with the terms of this policy. The approval to proceed permits the approach or discussions to begin and a proposal and dossier to be prepared; approval to proceed does not assure approval of the completed proposal and dossier.

(C) Requests for the president's approval to proceed shall be routed through the vice president for operations (for facilities). The request should contain sufficient information to reflect the approvals in paragraph (3A) and address the purposes of paragraph (3B).

 (4) Approval for benefactor and commemorative names, which require presidential or trustee approval.

(A) Proposals for benefactor naming will only be accepted from the vice president of university advancement.

(B) A complete proposal includes a dossier that addresses and verifies all of the applicable criteria in this policy, including:

1. A precise description of the facility to be named.

2. The exact name to be adopted.

3. The basis or reason for the naming; for commemorative names, why the proposed name is appropriate to the facility.

4. A description of the due diligence that has been performed on an individual for whom the facility is to be named.

5. The proposed duration of the name on the facility.

 6. Whether the individual is currently a public official.

 7. Benefactor names:

a. Require analysis and approval by the CWU Foundation. The foundation's analysis to include:

b. Consideration of the net present value of the gift.

c. Other contributions and activities of the donor.

d. Consistency with announced gift opportunity amounts.

e. Consistency with other CWU gift amount policies.

f. Other naming opportunities.

g. Approvals by the relevant department, school, and campus leadership (as appropriate).

h. If the naming is for someone other than a donor, formal permission of that person or his or her authorized representative.

(5) After receiving the recommendation, the president's executive leadership team may seek additional information, disapprove the recommendation, or approve the recommendation and, when appropriate, forward the recommendation to the board of trustees. The board will consider proposals according to its normal operating procedures.

(6) The vice president for operations should be notified of naming approvals that are covered by this policy but do not require action by the committee, president, or trustees.

[08/03/2011; BOT 03/15/02, Motion 02-18, BOT 06/13/03, Motion 03-38, BOT 10/10/03, PAC 09/05/07; Responsibility: BFA; Authority: Cabinet/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 11/07/2012; 06/14/17; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-060 Procedure on Policy and Procedure

A Policy (P) explains the reason for the regulation, a Procedure (R) explains implementation of corresponding policy. The P/R numbers often, but not always, correspond with one another.

CWU policies and procedures guide the application of state law and policies adopted by university divisions and the Board of Trustees.

To begin this process, contact the relevant unit leader to ensure support for the P/R changes.

Policies and Procedures (P/R) process:

(1) Contact the President’s Office for the official document.

(A) To modify an existing policy or procedure (P/R), request an official copy of the policy(s) and/or procedure(s) you would like to revise. Do not copy from webpage.

1. The President’s Office will send a cover page template.

a. Denote whether you are developing a new P/R, or modifying an existing P/R.

b. Provide a brief, itemized summary of why the P/R is being revised and cite the changes therein.

c. Include the completed cover page with the body of the policy and/or procedure as one document, not separately.

(B) If developing a new policy or procedure, president’s office staff will work with the appropriate division for placement within the P/R Manual. The number is generally assigned to the P/R upon approval by UPAC.  

(2) Writing and revising policies and procedures.

(A) Track Changes

1. Make edits and revisions to the Word document with the “track changes” feature turned on. This step is critical.

2. Tracked changes must be utilized every time revisions are made. The review process requires knowledge of all participants who made changes.

(B) Writing style

1. Use common language, present tense, active voice. Do not include proper names, emails, or locations, due to frequent changes (e.g. “go to the President’s Office” instead of “go to the President’s Office, Barge 304”).

a. Keep it simple, straightforward and easy for the reader to understand.

b. Avoid using “shall” and “shall not” if possible. Describe correct action(s) to be taken.

c. No need to refer to "CWU" within the text, it is implied.

(C) Formatting 

1. Do not use auto-format.

2. Use Calibri 10 pt. font.

3. One space after periods.

4. Only capitalize formal names and titles if referring to a specific person.

5. Hyperlink referenced RCWs, WACs, CWUPs, CWURs or other official documents. If you do not have a link for the official document, do not reference it.

6. Left justify everything.

7. Do not use indentation, italics, boldface, underline, or bullet points.

8. Subsections and subparagraphs are enumerated as follows, all left justified:

(1)

Space between each section to allow easier reading.

(A)

(B)

1.

2.

a.

b.

9. Footer: Include the numbered section and numbered sub-section of the P/R in the bottom left of the footer.

Footer format (example numbers only): 

CWUP 1-0 Board of Trustees

CWUP 1-70 Bylaws of the Board of Trustees

8. Page numbers to be added on the bottom right of the page Page number format: Page 1 of 4, Page 2 of 4, etc.

(D) Signature line. Add the following signature line with the proper information at the end of the P/R text. Keep all previous revision dates in signature.

1. Signature line format:  

[Responsibility: [name of division] Division; Authority: Executive Leadership Team/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Executive Leadership Team/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: (all previous review dates) XX/XX/20XX; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President]

2. Definitions:

a. Responsibility is the division responsible for the implementation and maintenance of policy or procedure.

b. Authority commonly rests under the Executive Leadership Team and University Policy Advisory Committee.

3. Incorrectly formatted documents will be returned to divisional staff, possibly resulting in significant approval delays.

(3) Submit draft revisions through your divisional lines:

(A) President’s Division moves from department to the chief of staff.

(B) There are multiple ways Academic Life policy moves through the university. Generally, Curriculum policy, General Academic policy and General Education policy will move from Faculty Senate to the vp of academic affairs/provost. All other policy related to Academic Life will generate from the office of the provost or move from an appropriate area to the vp of academic affairs/provost.

(C) Finance and Administration Division moves from department to the senior vp of finance and administration/CFO.

(D) Student Engagement and Success Division moves  from department to the vp of student engagement and success.

(4) Stakeholder approval process.

(A) If policy or procedure has budgetary implications, it will need to be presented before the President’s Budget Advisory Committee (PBAC) prior to step 4. A committee designee will make recommendations for consideration by the president.

(B) If policy or procedure has student engagement and success implications, it will need to be presented to the Student Engagement & Success Executive Committee. A committee designee will make recommendations to the president.

(C) If  policy or procedure has academic  implications, it will need be presented  before the Provost’s Council prior to step 4. A committee designee will make recommendations to the president.

(D) Upon review of and any further updates to the proposed changes at the divisional level as outlined in Section (3), the chief of staff or their designee will publish the proposed draft policy change on the UPAC website for comment by the general CWU community for a minimum of two weeks (14 calendar days).

(E) The vp or chief of staff will compile all feedback from the campus comment process and consider whether further changes to the proposed policy will be made.

(F) If proposed changes from the campus comment process affect the university budget, academic or student life, and/or the operations of a CWU division, the vp or chief of staff must resubmit the proposed policy in accordance with section (3) of this policy.

(G) The vp or chief of staff will review the proposed changes or new policy with the president prior to full review by the president’s Executive Leadership Team.

(H) If recommended by the Executive Leadership Team, the revisions or new policy/procedure will be submitted to UPAC – which meets quarterly, approximately one month into the quarter.

(I) If recommended by UPAC, the president can approve the new/revised policy or procedure, which then becomes an official document (except in cases which must go to the Board of Trustees. See CWUP 1-10-050 Powers and Duties).

[Responsibility: President’s Division; Authority: Executive Leadership Team/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Executive Leadership Team/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 04/26/2023; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-070 Procedures Manual Changes

(1) Definitions

(A) University procedure – A university procedure prescribes the means of implementing and complying with a policy. It states the “how” a policy will be implemented. Any university procedure must be linked to a university policy and identified in the respective policy. University procedures follow the approval process outlined below.

(B) Department procedure – A department procedure that applies only to a department or unit. For example, a procedure for employees in ITS on responsiveness to computer issues, i.e. what information is needed, location of computer, time of call, who will be responding, result of visit, etc. Departmental procedures are coordinated and approved by the vice president or chief of staff in the respective areas.

(2) Responsibility - The president’s office will be responsible for maintaining all university procedures on the web page. Appropriate links should also be established on individual division, department and unit web pages. An “s” drive account will be set up for the word document in order that identified individuals in each division can make recommended changes, in track change format, for consideration. The chief of staff is accountable for the ongoing review of university procedures and the executive assistant is responsible for the review within the president’s office and coordinating the review in each of the other two divisions.


(3) Approval Process - All university procedures shall be reviewed through the divisional lines (academic and student life up to the provost/vice president for academic and student life (VP); business and financial affairs up to the vice president for business and financial affairs/CFO (VP); president’s office and all others up to the chief of staff (CofS). The VP or CofS will bring forth procedures to executive leadership team for submittal to the president’s advisory council for recommendation to approve by the president.

(4) Format - The format for all university procedures will be determined by the president’s office. The basic guide for each procedure includes:

1. Title
2. Approval process (PAC / President / BOT)
3. Policy or procedure number as assigned by the president’s office
4. Date of approval and history of such approval
5. Responsible department, college, division
6. Authority for procedure (university policy)

(5) Procedure Review - The chief of staff will develop a schedule for the biennial review of all university procedures that have not been modified during the preceding two years.


[Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/PAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/PAC; Review/Effective Date: 4/6/2011; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

 

CWUR 1-60-095 Permanent Art Collection

(1) Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee  

(A) Central Washington University Vision: Central Washington University will be respected nationally for outstanding academic programs, global sensitivity and engagement, and a stimulating intellectual community that prepares students for lifelong learning and a diverse and changing world.  

(B) CWU Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee: The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee is appointed by and reports to the President of Central Washington University. The purpose of the committee is to consider and recommend the purchase of objects of art for the campus as authorized in RCW 28B.10.025(III.C.). In carrying out this responsibility, the committee will work with the Washington State Arts Commission (see Public Art for New Construction section).  

(C) The committee also establishes policy related to the University's Permanent Art Collection including:  

1. A procedure for evaluating for inclusion in the Permanent Art Collection, gifts of art to the president or other officers of the university that exceed $50.00 in value to the university.  

2. Guidelines for maintenance of the inventory of the permanent art collection.  

3. Guidelines for storage of the permanent art collection.  

4. Guidelines for display of items from the permanent art collection in university display cases or buildings.   

5. Guidelines for loaning items from the permanent art collection to interested parties.  

6. Guidelines for upkeep of and restoration or removal of damaged art. Members of the art selection and permanent collection committee have the authority and responsibility to curate existing and future artworks. This includes the authority to collect, preserve, maintain, store, safeguard and establish exhibit opportunities for all types of university art.   The committee shall be comprised of six appointed, voting members to include two faculty, one emeritus faculty, one art student, one representative from public affairs, and a representative from student success. The committee shall also be comprised of five ex-officio, voting members to include the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities, a facilities planning officer, an architect, a development officer, and the director of the Sarah Spurgeon Gallery. The terms of each appointment shall be three years. 

Normally one faculty member is from the Art Department. Additional faculty members may be appointed by the president to represent the departments which are housed in venues that are acquiring state artworks.

(2) Purpose of the Permanent Collection   The purpose of the Permanent Art Collection is to encourage, develop and maintain a collection for the benefit of the university community and the Ellensburg area.  

The scope of the collection includes all original works of art, antiques, fine craft objects, and/or other items of art acquired by the university, or its departments, auxiliary programs, schools, colleges, groups and individuals in the name of the University by way of purchase, gift, bequest, or by any other lawful means. Art purchased with CWU Foundation funds remains their property unless otherwise designated.   Additionally, it is hoped that Central Washington University’s Permanent Art Collection will increase artistic appreciation and enjoyment of the university surroundings by members of the university community. It also expands interests and understanding across a broad range of cultural and social backgrounds, promotes aesthetic and cultural development opportunities for students, and integrates art into the daily living environment of the university.  

Central Washington University acquires objects and works of art to be utilized in the best interest of the university and to further its responsibilities for teaching, research, and public service. The following guidelines are intended to insure the careful acquisition, inventory, and professional care and maintenance of art objects belonging to the university. The guidelines recognize that the acquisition and disposition of art is distinct from that of other types of personal property owned by the university.  

(3) Collection Objectives   The principal criteria in the selection of works for acquisition will be: quality, relevance, authenticity and provenance, condition, cost, legality of sale or gift, and terms of donation. The collection should not be restricted as to media, provided consideration is given to permanence and practical limitations of display and handling.   The collection seeks to:  

(A) Acquire works of art of demonstrable excellence and significance within the perceived developments of contemporary art.   

(B) Develop a major public art collection for the purpose of demonstrating the university’s continual commitment to the study, patronage and advancement of the visual arts.  

(C)Foster a general awareness and understanding of the visual arts among the university community and members of the general public through education and other outreach activities.  

(D) Enable research on the visual arts and support the teaching programs of the university.  

(E) Acquire works of art suitable for the purpose of enhancing the public areas, either buildings or grounds, of the university.  

(F) Provide a high standard of curatorial care and management.  

(G) Ensure that artists (including CWU students) from this community and region are represented, subject to consideration of quality and/or historical relevance.  

(H) Build a collection that meets instruction, research and information needs of faculty, students and the university community.

(4) Guidelines for Acquisition

(A) Definitions For the purpose of this document, the word "acquired" shall be interpreted to include receiving all acquisitions whether through purchase (using both appropriated or donated funding), commission, gift, trade, transfer, exchange, or bequest.   “Fine and Decorative Art” includes the following types of items that could have considerable monetary or historical value, or are of special significance to the university.  In general, fine art objects possess a quality that makes them worth more than their utility value.  Examples of 2-D works include, but are not limited to, paintings, photographs, prints, and maps.  Examples of 3-D works include, but are not limited to, sculpture, ceramics, china, silver and silver plate, metal ware, glassware, textiles, object ‘art (miscellaneous items), and cultural artifacts. In printed books, illustrations are the most obvious form of art. Frequently, however, the bindings or other elements of the book may also be considered art. When books are catalogues, “art” is noted in the cataloguing record, whether unique (as in a drawing laid in) or an integral part of the book (for example, a signed binding). Some examples of such art include photographs, paintings, prints, engravings, holographs, drawings, serigraphs, lithographs, illuminations and sculptural bindings.  

(B) Process for Selecting Art The acquisitions program will be overseen by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.  The financial management of the art acquisitions by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will be undertaken on the authority of the resident. All acquisitions valued over $50.00 will be submitted to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee for approval, taking into consideration the terms of acquisition and areas for collection development outlined in this policy. Approval by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will be decided by a majority of votes. The Chairperson of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will have a vote and, in the case of an equality of votes, a second or casting vote. During the approval process, Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee members will ensure that all questions of conflict of interest are avoided and will use their discretion by not voting where possible conflict exists. Meetings of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will be held at least once per month during the academic year. All proceedings of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will be minuted, permanently recorded, and stored in the CWU Brooks Library Archives department. Following approval, works not received as a gift will be accessioned into the Permanent Art Collection. The accession date will be the date at which the works were approved by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. New acquisitions will be electronically catalogued and photographed in accordance with museological standards and practices for the documentation of works of art.  The committee may delegate responsibility for inventorying artwork. For example, as of the date of this draft, the Chair of the Department of Anthropology has arranged an internship for that purpose. At the end of each year, the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will advise the university's director of Business Services and Contracts, in writing, of works of art which have been acquired during that year for the purposes of insuring and valuing the Permanent Art Collection. Information concerning new acquisitions will be made available through the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee’s annual report with due recognition given to donors and other supporters of the acquisitions program.

(C) Departments, Colleges, Centers Works of art that have been acquired by a unit of the university with university or CWU Foundation funds must receive (eg. Faculty, College, Center etc) approval from the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee and will be regarded as part of the Permanent Art Collection. The curatorial care, insurance, appraisal, security, conservation, framing, maintenance, freight, relocation, installation and storage of privately purchased works are not the responsibility of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. Works of art that fit within the guidelines of the Collection Objectives may be accepted into the Permanent Art Collection. Responsibility for all or part of the curatorial care, insurance, valuation, security, framing, conservation, maintenance, freight, relocation and installation of such works may be accepted, if agreed to in writing under conditions agreed to between the university and the individual unit/s concerned. The appointed building monitor(s) in each facility that has objects of art will take on the role of "custodian(s)" of the art. This person(s) will be responsible for reporting any change in condition or location of the object to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. This person(s) shall report to the committee annually, even if no change has occurred.  A file for each work of art will be maintained. The file should contain a letter of offer from the donor, provenance and conservation history; reports and invoices from conservators; a copy of the Deed of Gift, the purchase order or sales receipt; copies of each annual Inventory Report; and any photographs that document the object’s condition. This record also will serve as evidence of ownership and value should a loss by fire or theft occur, and it is strongly recommended that these files be kept in a fire proof cabinet, or, if this is not possible, keeping a copy of the file in another location. The responsibility for maintaining such files should be given to the Brooks Library Archives Department. Libraries or archival repositories will not be required to report works of art contained in books, archives, or manuscript collections because the work of art would be inventoried through the standard practice of cataloguing or other means of bibliographic control. The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will catalogue free standing works of art/artifacts for archival purposes. Materials containing works of art should be used only under supervision and be housed in a protective, secure environment. Artwork that is donated for a specific building or department will be displayed at that site unless building renovation or the work's condition requires re-location. The university reserves the right to find a new site for the work and will consult the donor about installation.

(D) Criteria for Acceptance All art acquisitions will be evaluated for acceptance by the Art Selections Committee using the following criteria:

1. The quality and condition of the object, aesthetic value and appropriateness to the academic environment and the department to which it is donated. The value of the object for scholarly use within an established collection on campus should be considered. Only works in good condition that do not require extensive conservation will be accepted into the collection. However, acceptance may be considered if funding for any necessary treatment is also forthcoming from the donor/vendor. A conservation report must accompany any work that has undergone conservation treatment.

2. Provisions must exist for cataloguing, conservation, maintenance, storage and exhibition of a professional standard.

3. Considerations for protection of the object through security systems and insurance restrictions should be considered.

4. Acquisitions outside the current stated policy of individual collections will only be made in very exceptional circumstances, and then only after proper consideration by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.

5. In acquiring works of art or objects for its collection, whether by purchase, gift, bequest or exchange, the university will take all reasonable steps to ascertain that a valid title to the object in question will be acquired, and in particular has not been acquired in, or exported from, its country of origin (or any intermediate country in which it may have been legally owned) in violation of that country's laws. (For the purposes of this paragraph 'country of origin' includes the United States).  Valid legal title of proposed permanent acquisitions and donations must be substantiated, and transfer of works to the collection must be documented by a signed legal donation document. If clear title cannot be provided, a proposed acquisition should not proceed. Title will pass to the university and not to any individual or organizational unit.  

6. The university will not acquire archaeological antiquities (including excavated ceramics) in any case where it has reasonable cause to believe that the circumstances of the recovery of the item involved the recent unscientific or intentional destruction or damage of ancient monuments or other known archaeological sites, or involved a failure to disclose the finds to the owner or occupier of the land, or the proper authorities. The Art Selections Committee will not knowingly accept any object that encourages or supports damage to cultural or historical sites.

7. Copyright in each of the art works shall remain the property of the artist unless signed over to the university. Whenever possible, the receiving unit should request a transfer of the copyright to the work of art. Under federal law, copyright protection is available to all works of authorship that have been fixed in a tangible medium (this includes pictorial, graphic and  sculptured works, photographs, prints and art reproductions, maps, globes, charts, diagrams, models, technical and architectural drawings).  

8. Owners of copyright have the following exclusive rights: to reproduce the work, to prepare derivative works, to distribute copies to the public, to perform/display the work publicly. These rights are divisible and may be conveyed separately or in entirety. Ownership of the copyright in a work of art is distinct from ownership of the material object. Ownership of copyright remains with the artist unless copyright was conveyed by written agreement. Copyright protection for a work created after January 1, 1978, endures for the life of the artist plus another fifty years. Works created prior to 1978 were granted two 28-year terms of protection, with renewal required after the first 28-year term. Once copyright protection has expired, the work falls into the public domain and can be used freely by anyone.   

9. Works of art protected by copyright are available to anyone for “fair use”, such as for criticism, teaching, or research.  “Fair use” is determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon four factors: the purpose and the character of the proposed use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount and substantiality of the portion used, and the effect of the proposed use upon the potential market for, or value of, the work.  

10. Federal copyright law has a provision pertaining exclusively to visual artists. It grants the creator of a work of visual art a limited right to maintain control over the work even after it has been sold. The artist has the right to claim authorship of the work and the right to prevent any intentional distortion, mutilation, or other modification of the work. These rights belong to the artist, even if the artist is not the copyright holder. They extend for the life of the artist and cannot be transferred, although they can be waived.   

11. All questions on the complex issues of the copyright should be referred to the Office of the General Counsel. 12. All new works donated to the CWU Foundation will remain under the Foundation or as designated  

13. At the time of purchase the University will request permission to create and publish images of the artwork.    

14. No person involved in the policy or management of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee may take advantage of privileged information received because of his or her position. Special care is required in considering any offer of an item either for sale or as a tax benefit gift from members of governing bodies, members of staff or their families or close associates.

15. There can be no commitment to permanent display, nor can the University be committed to retain ownership in perpetuity.

16. The purchase of objects for the University, either through commission or purchase will be formalized by a written contract for commission or bill of sale. Proposals and contracts will be reviewed by the University Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee and the Office of Business Services and Contracts.

17. The Art Selections Committee shall record and catalogue works of art and maintain a current location database. A current copy of this database shall be filed annually by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee with the President’s Office and the Brooks Library Archives department.

18. The intention is that an object shall remain in the collection so long as it retains its authenticity, pertinence to the collection, and physical integrity. Short range acquisition for the purpose of later sale, as well as speculative acquisition for short-range sales should be discouraged and then only entered into with the express approval of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.

(E) Gifts The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee reviews potential gifts over the value of $50.00 and makes recommendations to the president based on their artistic merit and appropriateness for the collection. The committee may reject a gift if there is not an acceptable site or if there is concern about long-term maintenance. Art gifts of historical significance to the university or of a commemorative nature will be part of the Permanent Art Collection as per Committee guidelines. All gifts of art are accepted in accordance with the CWU Foundation Gift Acceptance Policy. A deed of gift and/or acknowledgment of donation form will provide proof of ownership and protect Central Washington University from any future claims. This deed will include a statement of transfer of legal title and where applicable, copyright and literary rights and signature of the donor. The deed of gift or a copy of the deed of gift should be kept on file with the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.  Documentation should include but not be limited to (See Appendix B):

1. Name and address of donor and intermediary, if any.  

2. Description of the object in sufficient detail to enable easy identification and a photograph.  

3. Date of contribution and acknowledgment.  

4. Date of acquisition by the donor and method of acquisition.

5. Any records, receipts or other documents that provide proof of ownership or authenticity or enhance its educational value.  

6. A history of the object and any information that may have bearing in its authenticity or enhance its educational value.  

7. The original cost or appraisal of the object at the time of original acquisition.  

8. A current appraisal by an independent qualified appraiser.   

9. Factors used to arrive at the current value.  

10. Disposition of the property if not retained by the university.  

11. Any restrictions or conditions placed on the gift by the donor and the expiration date of the conditions.

(F) Criteria for Acceptance of Gifts

1. Appropriateness. In the judgment of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee’s Guidelines for Acquisitions.

2. Feasibility. Acceptance of the gift will not, in the judgment of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee, place excessive burdens on the available space, staff, or budget.

3. Conditions. Gifts accepted by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee should be accepted without special conditions regarding their ownership, use, display labeling, attribution, future disposition, etc. In general, fractional gifts will be avoided except when the attendant legal questions can be resolved to the satisfaction of the university.

4. Policies and Practices. Each donor will be advised by the appropriate administrators of the pertinent points of the University policies and practices regarding acceptance of loans and gifts.

5. Approval. Gifts to university Permanent Art Collection can only be accepted by the Vice President of University Relations upon the recommendation of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.

6. Acknowledgment. Following acceptance by the Vice President of University Relations, all gifts to the Permanent Art Collection will be acknowledged by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. It is strongly desired that all gifts and bequests of objects to the Permanent Art Collection be of an unrestricted nature. No work should be accepted with an attribution or requirement of exhibition in perpetuity. Only under the most exceptional conditions will the Permanent Art Collection accept gifts or bequests on which the donor has placed restrictions concerning its use and disposition. Every effort should be made to limit restrictions to a reasonable period after which they will expire. All records of any such restrictions will be entered into all records concerning the gift. The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will follow the general guidelines for deed of gift and documentation outlined above.

(G) Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee Budget The CWU president shall allocate $5000 a year to be transferred to a special reserve account for art maintenance. Disbursement of these funds shall be at the discretion of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee by majority vote. Unspent funds shall be re-appropriated to the special reserve account at the end of the fiscal year. Additional fund grants to support this program would be requested from alternate sources whenever practical.  

(5) Insurance   Donations, loans or purchases of works of art are not automatically insured by CWU. A certified appraisal must accompany all donations, loans or purchases of art. All works of art must be reported to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee, such committee designee shall notify the Program Manager of Business Services and Contracts should they determine the need for Fine Arts Coverage.     

(6) Public Art for New Construction (Washington State Arts Commission)

(A) Background Information The Art in Public Places program (AIPP) facilitates the acquisition and placement of artwork in publicly accessible places throughout Washington State. Percent-for-art funds are generated by new state building construction in state agencies, community colleges, universities and public schools. Local committees representing the project sites make all final artwork selection decisions, resulting in over 4,700 works of art located throughout Washington State’s public buildings.



These works are the State Art Collection, which represents 28 years of artwork acquisitions based on decisions made by the people who work or study in the places where the work is installed. This collection includes a variety of media and a broad diversity of contemporary artistic production from many of Washington State’s notable artists and other artists nationwide.



Artists working with the Art in Public Places program have been juried into the Artists Resource Bank through a competitive process held once every two years. The Art in Public Places Program, or the ½ of 1% for Art Program, was established by the state legislature in July 1974. The legislation was revised in 1983 to allow for the pooling of artwork allocations. Washington’s program is the second oldest percent for art program in the nation and is one of only four to include the public school system in their programming. The program is funded from the state’s capital construction budget. Half of 1% of construction budgets for state-owned buildings is added for the percent for art ordinance. The ½ of 1% for Art Program for state agencies and public schools applies only to new construction. The ½ of 1% for Art Program for universities and colleges, in addition to new construction, includes renovation projects exceeding $200,000. In keeping with the terms of the legislation, 15% of each percent for art allocation is used for administrative costs. In a typical biennium, the program receives notice of over 300 art allocations funded through the Capital Budget. To manage this number of projects, the Art in Public Places Program uses a slide registry, the Artists Resource Bank. Depending on the size of the allocation, the agency, college or school can choose from several opportunities to commission an artist in the Artists Resource Bank to create artwork specifically for the site. If there is no new percent for art allocations, the agency, college or school may still have an opportunity to have artwork as a temporary or permanent loan. New state-funded construction or renovations over $200,000 in community colleges and universities generate percent-for-art funds, which can be used to purchase artwork through the Washington State Arts Commission. The college or university may be notified by the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges or the campus’ financial office when the art funds are available and the Arts Commission contacts the campus about the artwork selection process. The CWU Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee, representing the campus, makes all final artwork selection decisions. With a percent-for-art allocation over $25,000, these local committees can commission an artist to create a new artwork specifically for their building. If the percent-for-art allocation is less than $25,000, sites can augment available “percent for art” funds from other sources to provide for a more ambitious art project. Colleges and universities also can release their money so another campus can augment its artwork budget.

(B) How Art in Public Places works with the University There are two ways to obtain art through this program: 1. purchase existing work through the Artists Resource Bank (if acquisition budget is less than $25,000) 2. commission new work (if budget is over $25,000) The CWU Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee works closely with a representative from the Washington State Arts Commission on either one of these choices.

(C) Timelines for Art Selection Purchase of existing work can be made by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee every other autumn following the Artists Resource Bank competition. During an Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee meeting, the Committee can select artwork from approximately 400 artworks viewed as slides. The  AIPP program  contracts with the artist and arranges to have the work shipped or delivered to the campus. These works must then be displayed in readily accessible public places. Money is budgeted for plaques which will be ordered by the AIPP program and sent later to accompany the artwork. The commission process can be started at any time once the $25,000 threshold is verified. If the college or university plans to augment the percent for art allocation, the AIPP program needs written confirmation.  The commission process generally takes place over five meetings during which the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee

(1) is oriented to the AIPP program and establishes criteria;

(2) reviews artists willing to work within your budget and narrows the selection to a list of semi-finalists;

(3) reviews the semi-finalists and selects an artist finalist and alternates;

(4) meets with the artist to discuss criteria so he or she can develop a proposal, and,

(5) reviews and accepts or rejects the proposal. If the proposal is accepted, the artist has one year to produce the artwork. If the proposal is not accepted, a new proposal is requested from an alternate. All artwork acquired under the AIPP program becomes part of the State Art Collection. The university becomes the steward for the works sited in their buildings.

(7)  Standards

(A) Inventory The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will record and catalogue the Permanent Art Collection using an electronic database.  Requests to access the database must be approved by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.  (Art Guidelines) All art objects acquired by the university are to be recorded and properly identified in this database regardless of the department acquiring the objects.  It is the responsibility of the department in which the works are housed to keep the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee informed as to the location of the works. A copy of this inventory will be given to the Business and Financial Affairs’ Surplus and Asset Management office. Changes in the status of inventoried objects, such as loss, destruction, or relocation of the objects should be reported to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee and Surplus and Asset Management office at the earliest convenience. Proposed new acquisitions of art valued at and above $50.00 should be reported to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee before the transaction is final. Art objects valued below $50.00 should be reported by the office or department receiving the item as soon after the acquisition as is convenient.  Losses involving theft should be reported to the University Police Department, the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee and the Surplus and Asset Management office. See the State Administration and Accounting Manual Section 30.20.22 “Assets Not Capitalized” for further information (Appendix C).

(B) Display If the object is to be placed indoors, the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will advise on matters of safety, security, and maintenance. If the object is to be placed outdoors, the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will advise on matters of safety, security, maintenance, accessibility, relationship to existing utilities, aesthetic or other considerations.

(C) Maintenance, Restoration and Repair A conservation survey of the Permanent Art Collection should be undertaken by a qualified conservator/s to identify works in need of immediate care and to develop an overall maintenance program. Funding for this activity will be made available from the President’s Office. A maintenance program will be designed to help avoid expensive, one-off treatments wherever possible and assist with the annual budgeting for conservation. It should be a form of preventative housekeeping rather than a corrective service and be reviewed every five years. Conservation of works will be undertaken at the discretion of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee in consultation with relevant conservators (e.g. paper, textile, paintings, sculpture or ethnographic specialists) following the maintenance program. Conservation treatment of any work shall only be undertaken by qualified conservators with references. All proposals for restoration and repair of works of art should be presented to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee for consideration. The university administration is responsible for the cost of conservation of large scale public art projects (sculptures, murals, etc.) not part of the AIPP. Should conservation be unfeasible and the poor condition of the works of art impugn the integrity of the piece, the work should be removed from view, or in the case of murals, be appropriately covered upon consultation with the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.

(D) Conservation Procedures CWU units that accept works of art, or contemplate purchasing a work(s) of art, have a responsibility to care properly for these works. This responsibility entails the proper display (including climate stability, location, and security) and long-term care.  Once a condition evaluation has been recorded, a decision to accept or reject the offered work can be made. If the work does not need the attention of a professional conservator, then the issue of acceptance is made easier. The receiving unit needs to assess its future financial capacity in case it becomes necessary to conserve the object. If the work needs immediate conservation, then the cost of treatment has to be balanced against the value of the object.  The receiving unit must have the financial capacity to pay for the conservation work. If the cost to conserve exceeds the appraised value, the work of art still may be accepted if its historic connection to the university, or some other factor, overrides the “loss” (the appraised value versus the conservation costs). To implement the above policy, the following procedures are recommended:

1. Evaluate the work for overall condition. Record your findings using the appropriate Condition Evaluation Form (See Appendix D). If the work is a complex one and you need assistance, please contact the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.

2. The permanent location of the work affects the long-term condition of the work. A work of art must have a stable climate; that is, the temperature and relative humidity should not fluctuate. The ideal is a steady year-round temperature of 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit, and a relative humidity of 45-55%.  Light (both natural daylight and artificial) fades works of art, including paintings on canvas, and can fade a work on paper with six months. Sunlight also fades wood, fabrics and leather. Therefore, no work of art should ever be subjected to direct sunlight. Even indirect sunlight from a south-facing window is too severe. Ideally, shield works of art from strong daylight by using blinds or shades. Lights or windows may require UV filters. Never accept a work of art on paper if you will be displaying it permanently. It will light-fade and be ruined within one to five years.

3. Evaluate the proposed permanent location for security; areas that can be locked at night and on weekends/holidays are preferred. Works of art need to be shielded from vandals when university staff are not present. A locked office is preferable to an unsecured hallway or unlocked classroom. Security plates can be attached to the backs of frames and then attached to the wall for additional security. The department should review the placement of expensive items to reduce the risk of theft or damage. Rare books should be housed in the Special Collections Library.

(E) Storage All objects are to be inventoried with regularity and stored or displayed within the acceptable professional standards required by the insurance carrier and common conservatory practice. All art objects acquired by the university are to be recorded and properly identified in the database regardless of the department acquiring objects. This is to ensure that institutions wishing to access the works for scholarly purposes can locate the works. It is the responsibility of the department in which the works are housed to keep the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee informed as to the location of the works. Any work of art that is currently not being displayed in a building will be stored in the assigned art storage room, currently, in Randall Hall Room 218.

(8) Deaccessioning/Disposal Deaccessioning is a process used to refine a collection. There are many reasons for its practice: to remove items of little relevance or those in poor condition, to rid a Collection of inferior material, clerical errors, space problems, the cost of maintenance and storage, irretrievable loss or irreparable damage or, as in the case of ethnographic artifacts, to return items to their original owners. It should not be used to remove works because of changes in fashion, social mores or the taste of administrators. It is best avoided in the first place by attending to the accepted Collection Objectives.  The Collection will be subject to periodic review in order to assess its relevance to the Collection Objectives.  Works will be considered on a case-by-case basis for deaccessioning based on the following criteria:

1. Irrelevance to the Collection Objectives  

2. Low artistic merit  

3. Duplication  

4. Theft or loss, damage or serious deterioration in condition  

5. The possibility of upgrading by exchange  

6. Repatriation of cultural material  

7. Absence of clear legal title  

8. Unsuitability for either the identified research collections or exhibition/display purposes  

9. The conservation and maintenance of a work causes an unreasonable strain on the assets of the collection, the cost of long-term care for a work outweighs its value, and a work endangers other works in the collection  

10. A work would be more appropriately housed by another collection or institution Erroneous inclusion in the collection  

(A) Process The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will prepare a statement of justification for deaccession. Written outside appraisals will be sought for any object of significant value that is being considered for deaccession. The work shall not be deaccessioned without the unanimous endorsement of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. Regardless of how acquired, works of art considered for deaccession anywhere in the university should first be reviewed by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee to determine whether they are of museum quality. All recommendations should be approached with extreme caution. A delay period of 6 months is required after which time the recommendation of the Committee should be reviewed. Records and photographs should be retained of the deaccessioned work. Only those works acquired by purchase would normally be deemed appropriate for disposal by sale. Consideration should be given to any special conditions attached to works acquired through bequest, donation or as part of a larger collection. Objects with mandatory restrictions may not be deaccessioned prior to expiration of the time limit if any exists, or it has been determined by a court of competent jurisdiction, that deviation from such restrictions may be allowed. Objects with precatory restrictions should not be disposed of until reasonable efforts have been made to comply with the restricting conditions. If there is any question as to the intent or force of the restrictions, the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee will seek advice from the University’s legal department. In the case of deaccessioning work of living artists, an attempt should be made to inform them of this intention, and the possibility of an exchange of artworks with the artist should be explored. The disposition of works by living artists will be accomplished in such a manner that it will not impugn the reputation of the artists or their body of work. The feelings of the artist should be respected and whenever possible the artist should be consulted regarding the disposition of their work. Works of art purchased with university funds or gifted/donated become the property of the state of Washington; therefore, disposition must comply with state law.  All university units must follow the procedures established by the Procurement Services/Surplus Property Office when disposing of a work of art. Proceeds from the sale of works of art will be used to acquire additional works, conserve, and display existing works for the university collection.

(B) Methods of Disposal Work acquired by donation should be offered in the first instance to the donor only if stated in the original agreement. If the piece is sold to another party, new works acquired with the money realized will be designated as coming from this donor "by exchange". If it is practical and reasonable to do so considering the value, the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee should notify the donor if it intends to dispose of such objects within 10 years or the donor's lifetime, whichever is shorter. Appropriate channels to deaccession works include auction, private sale or dealer.  Exchange with the artist or an appropriate institution can be sought, ensuring that the value of the exchanged work is equivalent to the intrinsic or actual worth of the art work. Donations to an appropriate non-profit or public institution are subject to RCW 43.09 Fair Market Value.The most current version of this code can be found online at:  http://www.apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw. If an artwork has been positively identified as a fake, has deteriorated, or is damaged beyond repair or if the conservation or restoration of the work would render it essentially unauthentic, it may then be destroyed on the approval of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee following completion of all insurance providers. The art work may be disposed of by direct sale, by auction or by exchange with another institution for an art work considered better suited for the permanent collection.  

(C) Departments, Colleges, Centers Should a department wish to dispose of an object previously acquired, the following procedures should apply:

1. The object should be presented to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee with a request to dispose of the object. This written request should include a justification for the disposal of the works of art and a proposed destination for the works of art.  

2. If the object is not desired for an established collection, the object should be disposed of using appropriate means.  

3. The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee should discourage the sale of objects of art without clear justification and are subject to SAAM 30.20.22. The most current version of this code can be found online at:  www.ofm.wa.gov/policy.

(D) Documentation

1. Full record of all exchanges and sales will be maintained.  

2. Records of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee shall document the removal of the objects from the collection and the nature of their disposal.  

3. The Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee, at their discretion, may make available information pertaining to acquisitions and deaccessions upon inquiry by a responsible party.   

4. Works to be deaccessioned will be archived in the Collection database.

(9) Loans/Exhibitions (See Appendix B) The appropriate form will need to be filed with Business Services and Contracts. Works from the CWU Permanent Art Collection may be lent to exhibitions outside the university at the discretion of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee within the following guidelines:

1. All requests for loans from the Permanent Art Collection must be in writing, addressed to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. An official lending agreement will be forwarded to successful applicants for their completion and signature before any work will be released.

2. Works from the Permanent Art Collection will only be lent to professionally run galleries and exhibition spaces with controlled environments and museum standard practices.

3. All freight costs are to be covered by the borrower. All additional costs such as crating, packing and reinstallation on return, where applicable, are to be met by the borrower.

4. Only recognized art carriers are to be used for carrying any work from the Permanent Art Collection. The university, with recommendations from the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee, reserves the right to nominate the carrier.

5. Evidence of insurance cover must be provided before any work can be released for loan. Central Washington University may choose to maintain its own blanket cover in some instances.

6. The object to be loaned must be able to survive, intact, the rigors that will be imposed by transportation and handling.

7. The Permanent Art Collection has no immediate need for the work. 8. Loans will be made for a period of 90 days or longer with special permission from the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee.

9. The borrowing institution will provide wall to wall insurance; a certificate of insurance will be required.

10. All works of art in the Permanent Art Collection are covered by copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce any work must be granted in writing by the copyright holder and the university prior to publication in any form. Copies of the publication are to be forwarded to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee for archival purposes.

11. All loans must be acknowledged as being the property of Central Washington University in all publicity material, publications, display labels etc. The university’s name must appear in full and no abbreviated forms, excepting CWU, are acceptable.

12. All works must be returned in the condition in which they were dispatched. Works on loan must not undergo any conservation treatment, reframing, hanging alterations or other changes without consultation with the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee and/or unless agreed to in writing by the university.

(A) Long-term Loans  Loans to institutions for extended tours, exceeding 1 year, may be made at the discretion of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee, with the provision that all institutions involved in the tour meet all the above guidelines for loan. Long-term loans from the collection may be made from time to time to university units at the discretion of the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. Objects selected for such loan should not be of primary importance to the collection or of high value. Security of the location and values of the objects are the important criteria for loans of this nature.

(B) Loans to the Permanent Art Collection  The following records will be maintained on all incoming loans: copies of all loan forms; condition reports, both incoming and outgoing, to include any special requirement for the object; all records of transport will be retained for a reasonable period; and any records that pertain to the work in regard to value and insurance. Temporary loans of material for exhibition or study may be accepted from individuals or organizations for relatively short periods of fixed duration; an object offered or promised as a gift may also be accepted as a temporary loan for a specified period pending the actual gift transaction. Works of art offered on a long-term loan basis will only be accepted on the understanding that the work will eventually be donated to the university.  Such an agreement will be documented by means of a signed form before the work is accepted for loan.  Under ordinary circumstances, the university does not accept deposits of objects or works of art unless there is reason to believe that the deposit will be changed to a permanent gift to the university or that it is unlikely that the object of value will be preserved in any other way. Although the deposit will receive reasonable care in utilization and storage to assure its preservation, the university will assume no responsibility for any loss or injury to the deposit which may occur in spite of care and protection provided. Should an object be received for long-term loan, it is recommended that a specific period of loan be defined at the outset and that a statement of intention to donate be acquired, if possible. The committee will make recommendations  to the president about loans of artwork to entities on or off campus.

10) Public Murals/Indoor Murals Proposals for murals depicting the educational, service or research mission of a department should be evaluated by the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee as any other commission of artwork

11) Appraisals The term “qualified appraisal” means an appraisal prepared by a professional appraiser no earlier than sixty days before the contribution of the appraised property, and no later than ninety days after the contribution date. To be independent of the donor, the qualified appraiser cannot be the donor or the donee, a party to the transaction in which the donor acquired the property, a person employed by any of the foregoing parties, a person related to any of those parties, nor have any financial interest in the works being appraised.  The appraisal must be signed and dated by an appraiser who charges an appraisal fee. An appraisal of a collection, or work of art must include the following:

(A) A detailed description of the object, including title, size, subject matter, medium, name of the artist, approximate date created, and interest transferred;

(B) The physical condition of the property;

(C) The date, or expected date, of the contribution, the date on which the property was valued, and the manner of acquisition;

(D) The terms of any agreement or understanding entered into, or expected to be entered into, by or on behalf of the donor, that relates to the use, sale, or other disposition of the property;

(E) The name, address, and taxpayer identification number of the appraiser; (F) A detailed description of the appraiser’s background and qualifications;

(G) A statement that the appraisal was prepared for income tax purposes;

(H) A history of item, including proof of its authenticity and a record of any exhibitions at which the particular art objects was displayed;

(I) A photograph of the object, of a size and quality sufficient to identify the subject matter fully;

(J) A statement of the factors on which the appraisal was based. This statement should include:

(K) The specific basis for the valuation, such as any specific comparable sales transactions, particularly sales of other works by the same artist on or around the valuation date;

(L) Quoted prices in dealers’ catalogues of works by the artist or comparable artists;

(M) The appraised fair market value of the property and the method used to determine the fair market value, particularly with respect to the specific property;

(N) A statement as to the standing of the artist in the profession and in the particular school, time, or period in which the work was produced.

12) Research Once completed, the Permanent Art Collection database will be available for perusal by scholars and interested parties on-line at CWU’s homepage. Copyright restrictions apply to all images and text. The collection is available as a research resource for members of Central Washington University and other universities, and for members of the general public with a genuine scholarly interest in the collection. Applications for an appointment to view the collection shall be in writing to the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee indicating areas of interest and purpose of visit. Access to the collection shall be at the discretion of the university with recommendations from the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee and while every effort shall be made to accommodate demands, access may be dependent upon staff resources at the time. A condition of use of the collection for research purposes is that a copy of any publications, papers, articles, etc. which include references to and/ or photographs of works in the Permanent Art Collection shall be deposited with the Art Selection and Permanent Collection Committee. Central Washington University will be acknowledged, where appropriate, in all material resulting from research using the CWU Permanent Art Collection.

13) Review of Guidelines These guidelines are to be reviewed biennially and reissued following the introduction of any significant changes resulting from these reviews, or every five years, whichever occurs first.

[Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/PAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/PAC; Review/Effective Date: 4/6/2011; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-110 Website Procedure

(1) Authority: CWUP 2-50-110 Website

(2) Definitions

Site Manager: The Department of Public Affairs provides strategic oversight/leadership and overall direction for changes to design, content and site standards. The Department of Public Affairs is the manager of the CWU website. The site manager is the official source of information for Central Washington University.

Site Administrator: The ITS Web Development Office will provide overall technical administration/development for the website and has the authority to grant publishing/permission roles. The Development Office is the site administrator.

Content Owner: The content owners will review and approve any changes to content for departments and divisions. Vice presidents and Chief of Staff will designate content owners who may delegate this responsibility.

Page Editor: The page editor adds and deletes content from the website of a college, department or program. Page editors will edit content according to university website protocols and with the approval of the content owner. Editors must have the training, tools, and access to edit and publish information. Proposed structural or functional changes to webpages must be approved by the site manager. When webpage content changes are needed, page editors will submit them to department chairs or unit supervisors through the workflow process for authorization and to ensure that the information is not duplicated elsewhere. Any requests to deviate from this process must be approved by the Site Manager.
Content Management System (CMS): Drupal is the university CMS.

(3) Home-Page Calendar - The purpose of the home page CWU calendar is to make it easy to find information about CWU-sponsored events. The calendar is not a scheduling tool. The calendar will list only events sponsored by a recognized university entity.

(4) Standards - All web development will occur within the CMS environment. The site manager may authorize CMS environmental changes if an urgent need has been clearly demonstrated.

The official webpages of all university departments, divisions, and programs will reside within the CWU CMS. Use of off-campus domains or special applications must be approved by the site manager with the consent of executive leadership team.

Websites that are not migrated into the CMS will not be searchable by the CMS database search function. However, these sites are subject to section 5 of this procedure.

Blogs located with the CMS and written on behalf of the university must be approved by the site manager and the executive leadership team. Blogging must conform to Section 4 of this document.

(5) Removal of Web Content - Removal of material deemed to be offensive or inappropriate:

Upon discovery of offensive or inappropriate text/images the site administrator, acting under the authority of the site manager, will remove such material from the university website.

Removal of inaccurate, unprofessional, disparaging or inflammatory content:

Upon discovery of material that is clearly inaccurate, unprofessional, disparaging or inflammatory, the site administrator, acting under the authority of the site manager, will remove such material from the university website.

(6) ADA/Section 508 Compliance - CWU will strive to ensure equal public access to information posted on the university website.


[Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 08-03-2011; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

 

CWUR 1-60-120 University Committees

University Committees, Councils, Task Forces and Teams Procedures

(1) Standing Committees

(A) Proposals to add, revise, or eliminate a committee are presented to the President’s Executive Leadership Team by the appropriate vice president or chief of staff (if the committee carries shared responsibility across divisions) for review and recommendation to the president and submittal to the university policy advisory committee. All committees will be reviewed every other year by the Chief of Staff for continued need and appropriateness.

(B) Membership:

1. Solicitation of Committee Members: At the beginning of winter quarter each year, the appropriate vice president or chief of staff will send to the faculty senate, division heads, the employee council, the associated students of Central Washington University, and/or the exempt employees association a list of standing committees with membership and current terms. The request shall include a statement of the purpose for the committee and schedule of meetings. Each group will be asked to solicit names of those interested in serving beginning in fall quarter in open seats appropriate to each group. When appropriate, external community leaders will be asked to participate on committees.

2. Prioritization of Candidates: Each employee group will develop a list of candidates for each applicable position, prioritize the names, and submit the list to the vice president or chief of staff by the end of winter quarter.

3. Terms of Office: Terms of office for appointed committee members will normally be three years, unless otherwise designated by the committee, except that student members will serve one-year terms. Terms of office will be staggered among members of a committee to ensure continuity of membership on each committee.

4. Notifying Appointees: For each committee, the person to whom the committee reports will notify all new members of their appointment no later than May 1, specifying the committee’s purpose and noting who will convene the meeting.

5. Mid-Year Vacancies: In the case of mid-year vacancies, replacements will be drawn from the rank ordered lists provided at the beginning of the year. If no additional names are available, the person to whom the committee reports will notify the appropriate employee/student group(s) or division and ask for two names to consider for the vacancy. The same process as described above will be followed in the selection of replacements. The person to whom the committee reports will write the letter of notification of appointment.

6. Names of members will be provided to the president’s office no later than May 15 of each year for updating to the committee web page.

(C) Meetings:

1. The university official to whom the committee reports is responsible for convening the committee at the end of each academic year during the month of May for transitioning new members onto the committee and presenting the committee with its charge for the upcoming academic year. Unless an ex-officio member is designated to serve as chair, a committee chair will be elected at the last meeting of the academic year, normally in May. All committee members are voting members unless otherwise noted.

2 The chair or his/her designee will be responsible for leading the committee to develop goals, objectives, and strategies to accomplish the charge.

3. A record of agendas, minutes reflecting official decisions of the committee and significant documents shall be maintained by the committee chair.

4. Robert’s Rules of Order (latest edition) will be the recommended standard manual of parliamentary procedure for university committee meetings if issues of procedure arise.

5. Regular attendance is expected of all members. If any committee member consistently misses meetings, the committee member may be replaced.

6. The committee chair shall submit an end-of-year report to the university official to whom the committee reports by June 30. That report should reflect the accomplished goals/objectives with recommendations for the following year’s committee. This report will be submitted in the committee notebook in addition to copies of the agendas, minutes, and attendance records of the committee meetings. The notebook will be provided to the president for review annually. The university official will be responsible for maintaining the yearly reports and having them readily accessible if requested.

7. Committees shall meet as needed, normally at least quarterly unless otherwise designated.
8. Each committee will identify a support person for the committee, either a committee member or some other agreed to position.

(2) Councils, Task Forces and Teams:

All councils, task forces and teams currently configured or which have been in operation during the previous fiscal year will be reported to the Chief of Staff no later than July 31 of each year for the fiscal year July 1 through June 30. A short narrative will be provided with each providing the intent, outcome, membership and if still in operation, the expected outcomes for the coming fiscal year.

(A) Councils

1. Solicitation of Council Members: At the beginning of winter quarter each year, the appropriate vice president or chief of staff will send to the faculty senate, division heads, the employee council, the associated students of Central Washington University, and/or the exempt employees association a list of standing councils with membership and current terms. The request shall include a statement of the purpose for the council and schedule of meetings. Each group will be asked to solicit names of those interested in serving beginning in fall quarter in open seats appropriate to each group. When appropriate, external community leaders will be asked to participate on councils.

2. Prioritization of Candidates: Each group will develop a list of candidates for each applicable position, prioritize the names, and submit the list to the vice president or chief of staff by the end of winter quarter.

3. Each college, department or division will develop appropriate mission statement, guidelines, policies and/or procedures for each council to include membership requirements that will be submitted for review by the president’s executive leadership team for final approval by the appropriate vice president or chief of staff.

4. Membership appointment is conferred by the respective vice president or chief of staff and should be inclusive across divisions, staff groups and with student representation, when appropriate.

(B) Task Forces

1. Task force guidelines / charge are developed by the particular college, department or division and approved by the appropriate vice president, chief of staff or president.

2. Membership appointments are conferred by the respective vice president, chief of staff or president and should be inclusive across divisions, staff groups and with student representation, when appropriate. Faculty members for any task force will be solicited by the respective task force.

(C) Teams

1. Team guidelines / charge are developed by the particular college, department or division and approved by the appropriate vice president, chief of staff or president.

2. Membership appointments are conferred by the respective vice president, chief of staff or president and should be inclusive across divisions, staff groups and with student representation, when appropriate. Faculty members for any team will be solicited by the respective team.

(3) Faculty Representation on Committees, Councils, Task Forces or Teams

(A) Any compensation agreed to for faculty members expected to participate during the summer that are not already performing duties at this time will be borne by the respective task force’s department, division or college.

(B) Members solicited from faculty senate will be sent to the provost for submittal to the appropriate committee or council.

(C) Service on any committee, council or task force will be considered part of the service requirements and considered during the promotion and tenure review.

(D) Faculty filling seats on university committees, councils, and task forces will report to the Faculty Senate according to requirements established by the Senate.


[Responsibility: President’s Office; Authority: Cabinet/UPAC; Reviewed/Endorsed by: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 11/09/2016; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

(Back to the Top)

CWU News

Submit your cost-saving ideas and win up to $10,000

May 22, 2024

by

CWU Board of Trustees announces 2024 Distinguished Faculty

May 22, 2024

by

More News