CWUP 5-50

CWUP 5-50-010 Definition of Curriculum Terms

(1) Certificate - Certificate programs are specialized career programs, often geared for admission to licensing or career entrance tests, that result in a certificate (Type A-D). Certificate programs may also be noncredit. (See CWUR 2-50-090 for certificate type definitions.)

(2) Cross-listed course - Course that may be offered by two or more programs or within the same program. Cross-listed courses must bear the identical course outcomes, description, credit, title, and numbering; only the prefix will be different. A statement must be added to the course description of cross-listed courses that applies the following structure, “[BUS XXX and [ENG XXX] are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both.” A cross-listed course is available under both departments’ course numbers with a shared cap..

(3) Curriculum – Refers to individual courses and degree programs offered by the university

(4) Degree - Title or rank awarded by a college or university to a student who has successfully completed a required course of study (e.g., associate’s or bachelor’s or master’s or specialist).

(5) Degree program - A set of educational requirements, identified jointly by the department or other degree-granting unit and the college or university, which leads to a degree. Associate of Arts program requirements involve a combination of general education courses and elective courses. Baccalaureate program requirements involve a combination of general education courses, courses in the major field of study, and elective courses. Graduate program requirements involve intensive study in the major field, preparation in the use and conduct of research, and/or a field or internship experience; professional programs generally prepare individuals for professional fields (e.g., law, medicine).

(6) Degree title - A full designation of the degree including level (e.g., associate, bachelor, master), type (e.g., arts, applied science, science, education, fine arts), and major (e.g., mathematics, music, history).

(7) Layered Course – A layered course is one that has different number designations undergraduate and graduate students at the 4XX/5XX levels taking the same course.

The 5XX level course must have additional learner outcomes and may have different course requirements.

(A) Graduate students in graduate/undergraduate layered courses, must take the course at the 5XX level or higher. Such courses provide faculty the opportunity to augment course material with graduate-level content and outcomes in a way that meets the intellectual rigor graduate students need and enhances the teaching of upper-division undergraduates.

(B) In all cases, distinctions expected between these corresponding levels typically focus on differences in content and assessment stemming from each program’s specific education objectives. In general these distinctions require a greater depth of student involvement and increased demands on student intellectual or creative capacities than would be expected at the lower level.

The distinctions must be clearly identified in the content and assessment methods outlined in each course syllabus, as well as new course proposal forms. Examples of potential content differences include, but are not limited to: additional readings or additional writing expectations, additional laboratory, field, performance or studio work. Examples of assessment distinctions include, but are not limited to: different grading scales and assessment of additional work.

A statement with the following structure must be added to the course description: “[MUS4XX] and [MUS5XX] are layered courses; a student may not receive credit for both.”

Both layered courses do not have to be offered at the same time.

(8) Major – The major forms the basis for granting of a baccalaureate degree. It is a coherent, in-depth degree program in a particular discipline or disciplines wherein the student will develop and demonstrate an increasing awareness of both the possibilities and the limits of the major program of study. Majors are designed to provide a mastery of the content, insights, skills and techniques appropriate to an undergraduate education in a particular body of knowledge. Majors will consist of courses that are often sequential, leading to advanced study in the discipline(s). A major will consist of a minimum of 45 credits. A 45 to 59 credit major requires completion of a minor and/or second major, in which case the total credits of the major and minor/2nd major must total at least 60 credits. (Refer to CWUP 5-50-020(3) for upper credit limit.)

(9) Minor - A minor is a coherent arrangement of courses in a particular discipline that provides an area that complements or supplements the student’s major. A minor will consist of a minimum of 20 credits and a maximum of 44 credits.

(10) New degree program – A proposed arrangement of courses which differ from any other offered by CWU in one or more of the degree title specifications (CWUP 5-50-020(17)). A program leading to a new degree (as defined above), even if constituted entirely of existing courses, requires review and approval.

(11) PADstone (CWU 184 General Education Program) – PADstone is a variable prefix/variable topic course requiring sub-title and sub-description (up to 35 words) approvals. 184 course offerings may not be required in any degree program under any prefix.

(12) Shared Core - A shared core is defined as a group of courses shared by all specializations within a major degree within a department/college. Shared cores consist of no fewer than 25 credits for an undergraduate program or 15 credits for a graduate program.

(13) Specialization - A specialization is a coherent, focused subfield within a degree program. A specialization can be distinguished from a new degree in that the full designation of the degree title – including level, type and major – does not change when a new specialization is added. The courses constituting the specialization must consist of no fewer than 20 credits for an undergraduate program or 15 credits for a graduate program.

Programs may offer options in satisfying core course requirements as long as they provide evidence that the options have equivalent student learner outcomes.

(14) Student Learning Outcomes - Statements of what a learner should be able to know or do, after the successful completion of a program and/or a course. Outcomes focus on the ends rather than means, describe product rather than process, and reflect terminal performance rather than course content. The outcomes are what the department wants each student to achieve each time the course is offered regardless of who the teacher may be. For assessment purposes, learning outcomes must be stated in observable or measurable terms.

(15) Variable Prefix - Variable prefix courses are identified by the CWU prefix and a single dedicated course number (e.g. CWU 184). Once a course is approved, the prefix may be replaced to represent the department/program offering the course. Only the prefix may change.

(16) Variable Topic - A variable topic course has a fixed prefix, number, title, description, number of credits, and learner outcomes and assessments (as approved). Discipline-specific content is overlaid, requiring a sub-title and sub-description.

FSCC will review sub-titles and sub-descriptions for General Education courses when proposed. All General Education course sub-titles and sub-descriptions will also be reviewed by the General Education Committee.

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/Executive VP for Academic Affairs; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 08/09/2016; 02/07/2018; 06/05/2018; 06/20/2023,0 3/26/24; Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 10/21/2016; 04/18/2018; 06/13/2018; 11/04/2020; 06/14/2023; 08/02/2023; 05/29/2024; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President]

CWUP 5-50-020 Jurisdiction for Curriculum Terms

(1) Faculty. The teaching faculty collectively is the major force governing the curriculum of the university.

(2) Academic Departments - Departments have the responsibility to develop specific courses and programs and to initiate course/program changes. 

(3) Faculty Senate - The faculty senate acts on recommendations made by the faculty senate curriculum committee (FSCC) for:

(A) All curriculum policies, including revisions to, CWUP 5-50, and policy recommendations from university committees and offices concerned with the curriculum (e.g., General Education Committee, School of Education, Graduate Council, Career Services, Office of the Registrar, Deans’, associate Office of the Provost).

(B)  New majors, minors, certificates, specializations, and master’s degrees.                       

(C) Majors which exceed upper credit limits or changes to existing programs that extend the number of credits required beyond the upper credit limits previously approved by the Faculty Senate. However, changes to existing majors that decrease or do not change the number of required credits do not require Faculty Senate approval. Bachelor of Arts approved for 75 credits. Bachelor of Science approved for 110 credits.

(D) Final approval for general education changes.

(4) FSCC reports and makes recommendations to the faculty senate concerning the following:

(A) The FSCC has supervisory authority to review and make recommendations on all curricular and program proposals presented to it for academic integrity, intellectual quality, clarity of course descriptions, inclusion of student learning outcomes and assessment plan.

(B) The committee screens curriculum proposals to assure their compliance with CWU Policies.

(C) The FSCC screens department/program catalog information to ensure its clarity, accuracy, and compliance withCWU Policies.

(D) The FSCC is responsible for keeping CWUP 5-50 up to date. Revisions are approved by the Faculty Senate and the University Policy Advisory Council (UPAC).

(5) General Education Committee - (See CWUP 5-100). The General Education Committee reports to the faculty senate and makes recommendations to the Faculty Senate on general education requirements.

(6) The Director of the School of Education approves all teacher education proposals.

(7) Graduate Council - The Graduate Council reviews all program proposals and revisions for graduate study and the Dean for Graduate Studies reviews all course proposals or changes which are numbered 500 and above.

(8) Board of Trustees. The Board approves all proposals for new major degrees, graduate degrees, and degree types after they have completed internal review.

(9) Governance - Whenever questions of curriculum policy arise from curriculum proposals, the FSCC should be consulted. Whenever questions or concerns of an administrative nature arise, the Office of the Provost should be consulted.

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/ Executive VP for Academic Affairs; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 08/09/2016; 02/07/2018; 06/05/2018; 06/20/2023; 03/26/24: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 10/21/2016; 02/07/2018; 06/13/2018; 04/17/2019; 11/04/2020; 06/14/2023; 08/02/2023; 05/29/2024; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President] 

 

CWUP 5-50-030 General Principles

(1) Curriculum Approval Effective Date. The electronic catalog is the official compilation for all curriculum. The electronic catalog will become available at the end of spring quarter of each year. New degree programs become effective when they have been approved by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. Program and general education requirement changes will become effective in the fall quarter following publication in the official electronic catalog.  Course changes, not affecting program requirements, become effective when they have been approved by the FSCC. New specializations, minors, and certificates become effective when approved by the faculty senate. (Reference CWUP 5-50-040).

(2) Curriculum Approval Deadline. The final deadline for inclusion in the catalog will be established by the provost or the provost’s designee in consultation with the provost’s council and the FSCC. Specific dates for submission and approval will be established jointly by the registrar, the provost’s council, the FSCC, and the executive committee of the faculty senate. The curriculum approval deadline will be made public to department chairs. In order for changes to be incorporated into the official electronic catalog for fall, changes must be submitted to the FSCC by the published deadline.

(3) Curriculum Changes. All course and program changes, additions, and deletions are considered in terms of their relation to the academic mission of the university, college, department, program and their adherence to the CWUP policies as outlined in this document. All curriculum changes are evaluated for needless duplication and potentially deleterious effects on other programs. Curriculog proposals are the official process for all curriculum additions, deletions, and changes.

(4) Internal Program Approval Process. Proposals to add new degree programs are subject to review by the faculty senate, the provost/ vice president for academic affairs, and the board of trustees prior to submission for approval to the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. A change in level (e.g., bachelors to masters or masters to bachelor’s degree) or type of degree (e.g., B.A., B.S., B.F.A.) is defined as a new degree program or a moderate degree change.

(5) Program Change. At least two years prior to any course or other programmatic alterations impacting any of the state-wide transfer and articulation agreements the department proposing the alteration will inform the provost’s office and Central Washington University’s institutional representative to the Joint Transfer Committee (JTC). The representative is responsible for reporting this information to the JTC and Registrar Services.

(6) Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) Approval Process.

NWCCU must be informed in writing of new degree or certificate programs or if an existing program will be offered in a new location. Additional information may be required. The provost’s office provides NWCCU with an annual report.

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic Affairs; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 08/09/2016; 06/20/2023; Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 10/21/2016; 08/02/2023; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President]

CWUP 5-50-040 Curriculum Change

The official process for curriculum (new or updated) will be the electronic curriculum process called Curriculog. The submission process begins at the program or department level. The FSCC only considers proposals launched using Curriculog. Specific guidelines are provided on the proposals for each type of curriculum change (See CWUR 2-50-040 for specific procedures). 

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic & Student Life; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 08/09/2016: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 10/21/2016; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President] 

CWUP 5-50-050 Catalog Copy

Catalog copy for departments and programs is approved by the FSCC. Changes to catalog narratives, including admission requirements, special requirements, descriptions of program fees or financial obligations, require a program change proposal and FSCC approval. All changes will be effective in the fall term following publication in the official electronic catalog (OEC). All curriculum will be imported to the OEC from Curriculog.

Narrative changes consisting of faculty/staff names, location and general department information can be changed in the current OEC upon request of the department chair.

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic & Student Life; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 08/09/2016: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 10/21/2016; 02/20/2019; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President] 

5-50-060 Curriculum Rules for Implementation

(1) Cooperative Education

Cooperative education (X90) is an individualized contracted field experience where the student is actively engaged in hands-on learning with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination.

(2) Credit Hour Allocation to Courses

Credit Hour Allocation to Courses - Academic credit provides the basis for measuring the amount of engaged learning time expected of a typical student enrolled not only in traditional classroom settings but also laboratories, studios, internships and other experiential learning, distance, correspondence, and competency-based education.

(A) Traditional, Seat-Time-Based Courses - A minimum of one class work hour (approximately 50-60 minutes of instruction) and an additional two hours of out-of-class student work each week for one credit hour during a 10-week quarter. If the learning experience is offered in a different time frame (e.g., six-week summer session), the student time required to complete the course should reasonably approximate 30 hours of combined direct instruction and student work per credit. If direct instruction is not the principal mode of learning for an academic experience (e.g., laboratory courses, studio work, some on-line courses), the student time required to complete the course should reasonably approximate 30 hours of student work per credit.

(B) Hybrid or Online Courses - The credit hours awarded for a given course or academic experience must be reasonably equivalent to the standard of 3 hours of combined classroom instruction and student work per credit hour for a 10 week quarter. These hours may consist of course activities including, but not limited to:

  1. Face-to-face course meetings
  2. Virtual course meetings or student-instructor and student-student interactions
  3. Time to read/view assigned texts or other assigned materials
  4. Experiential learning activities consistent with the learning objectives of the course
  5. Synthesis/processing/reflection time and activities (may be used for writing or production of creative work which may take many forms including but not limited to journals, formal papers, projects, blogs, art, music, etc.)

(C) Alternative Outcome-Based Courses - Credit may be awarded for an amount of learning equivalent to learning in a seat-time-based course as documented by student attainment of learning outcomes as verified by assessment of student achievement by the appropriate academic department. Students completing competency-based courses would be awarded the same credit equivalent to learning in the same seat-time-based course.

(3) Graduate Courses (initial digits 5XX, 6XX, 7XX)

(A) Graduate Enrollment - Graduate courses numbered 501 and above are generally restricted to students who have a bachelor's degree and who have formally been admitted to a graduate program of the university. Competitive admission may be required for some programs.

(B) Undergraduate Enrollment - Seniors may enroll in graduate courses with the permission of the instructor and the department chair. Credit earned by seniors may meet either undergraduate or graduate program requirements, but not both, with the exception of some dual degree programs. If the credit earned by a senior is to be applied to a graduate program, approval must be obtained from the graduate program director and the dean of graduate studies and research prior to enrollment.

(C) Curricular Criteria - Graduate curricula are usually more specialized than undergraduate curricula, focusing on a few academic or applied areas. Introductory courses and courses that can be approached by a student without extensive preparation are not appropriate to the graduate level.

(4) Individual Study Courses

Individual study courses (X96) are those that include study of specific topics that are not offered as existing courses. The individual study course may be repeated for credit.

(5) International Study Courses

University-sponsored international courses and programs must meet the same academic criteria as would be required of similar programs on the home campus.

(6) Lower and Upper-Division Courses (initial digit 1XX, 2XX, 3XX, 4XX)

(A) Lower-division courses (1XX and 2XX) are general introductions to a field of study. They are normally open to all students, not just those majoring in the field.

(B) Upper-division courses (3XX and 4XX) are more specific than lower-division courses and may require prerequisites.

(7) Final Graduate Level Culminating Experience

Final culminating experience credits (6XX or 7XX) will have the following catalog description:

DEPT 6XX or 7XX: Final culminating experience title has to be specified as one or more of the following: Master’s Thesis, Project Study, Portfolio Review, Examination, Creative or Studio Project, or Internship.

Prerequisite: permission of chair of student’s graduate faculty supervisory committee. Designed to credit and record supervised study for the master’s thesis, non-thesis project, studio project, public recital, portfolio review, internship, and/or examination. Grade will be S/U. May be repeated for up to six credits for all Master’s degrees and may be repeated for up to 12 credits for terminal Master’s degrees.

(8) Office of Continuing Education - Credit Offerings

(A) At least one of the following conditions must be met in order for a credit course or program to be offered through the office of continuing education:

1. The course/program must be a test of new and emerging markets which may involve any or all of the following: A new academic course or program; A new location; A new audience of students; A new technology for delivery.

2. An offering which increases access and falls outside the limits of state supported university offerings for the main campus and university centers as determined each year by the provost/vice president for academic and student life.

3. A professional development (500) course as defined in CWUP 5-50-020.

a. The course/program must be taught by a member of the university faculty or a person approved by the appropriate department following the provisions of the faculty code for the appointment of faculty.

b. Students should have available the appropriate library materials, laboratories, special equipment and other facilities the course may require.

(B) The provost/vice president for academic affairsor designee has authority to approve credit courses, programs or certificates offered through the office of continuing education. New courses for credit, new degree programs and new credit bearing certificate programs need to follow established internal and external approval process.

 (9) Office of Continuing Education - Noncredit Offerings

(A) As part of the continuing education of the general public, the university offers opportunities for learning which do not carry academic credit. Conferences, workshops, institutes, seminars, symposia, short courses and similar learning activities are offered to individuals for professional development, learning new skills or general information.

(B) The subject matter (content) of noncredit offerings must be consistent with the university mission and should reflect the general nature of the institution. They must not duplicate or compete for enrollment with credit bearing courses.   The office of continuing education will collaborate with appropriate colleges, departments and university staff units as needed where potential duplication or competition is identified. Non-credit courses and non-credit certificates offered through the office of continuing education may be provided in-state, out-of-state or out-of-country with approval of the provost or designee.

(C) Prior to scheduling a noncredit offering, an appropriate academic department or faculty member must be consulted for input on appropriateness of the offering, credentials of instructor (if not CWU faculty), suggestions on evaluation and other recommendations to insure overall quality.

(10) Prerequisites, co-requisites, other qualifications

(A) Prerequisites are courses or other requirements that are verifiable in PeopleSoft and required prior to enrollment in a course (such as major status, grade requirement).

(B) Co-requisite courses are those that must be taken at the same time.

(C) Other qualifications may include but are not limited to:

1. Permission of the instructor or department (using permission will override other pre/co-requisites).

2. Fingerprint clearance.

3. Specific age requirements.

(11) Equivalent courses typically carry the same credit load, but may differ in title, catalog number, and/or prefix. The following statement must be added to the course description: MKT 3XXand MKT 3xx are equivalent courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Equivalent courses do not have to be offered the same term.

(12) Professional Development Courses

(A) Professional Development courses will have the following catalog description:

DEPT 500: Professional Development (1-5). Development topics and issues for in-service and continuing education of professionals. Not applicable to degrees nor institutional requirements for endorsements or teaching certificates offered through the university. Usually graded S/U.

(B) The course may be offered for a period of five years. There is no limit on the number of times such a course may be offered during the five year period. After the five year period, the course must be resubmitted. The office of continuing education will notify the appropriate department annually of expiring professional development courses.

(13) Reserve Courses and Programs

(A) Courses are put on reserve when they are not regularly scheduled course offerings or have not been taught for five years. Reasons for placing courses on reserve could include temporary staffing changes, anticipated accreditation changes, etc.

(B)  Programs are put on reserve when the curriculum becomes obsolete; student admission to the program has dropped, lack of teaching faculty/staff, or is no longer feasible to teach.

1. Programs will stay on reserve for five years before being permanently deleted.

2. A department may request that a program be taken off reserve within the first five years by submitting a program reactivate form reserve proposal. Changes to the reactivated program should be submitted using the program and/or narrative change proposal in Curriculog.

(14) Course Accessibility

To be in compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accommodative Policy, learning outcomes must be explicitly stated and must specify “essential elements” for ADA purposes and specific measures for assessment.

Such elements may be attendance, participation, quizzes, papers, presentations, and projects. The student learning outcomes specify a body of knowledge that the department wants taught each time a course is offered regardless of who the teacher may be. The educational processes that will be used in evaluating students, which may vary with different instructors, need to be separate from the essential elements.

(15) Workshops, Special Topics, Seminars

(A) Workshops (X91) are non-lecture courses which require students to research, develop, present, and discuss projects and ideas. No more than eight credits can be applied to a master's program. Usually graded S/U.

(B) Special Topics (X98) are courses offered on a trial basis and must meet standards applied to regular courses. Exceptions for expedited Special Topics (X98) courses may be approved by the FSCC as specified in CWUR 2-50-060.

(C) Seminars (X99) are courses in which students carry the major responsibility for course preparation, research, and presentation of topics.

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic Affairs; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 08/09/2016; 06/05/2018; 12/15/2020; 6/28/22; 06/20/2023; Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 10/21/2016; 06/13/2018; 2/20/2019; 02/03/2021; 11/09/22; 08/02/2023; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President]

CWUP 5-50-070 Rules for Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees

(1) Exceptions to the credit limits for BAS, BA and BS degree programs as defined in CWUP 5-50-020(5) may be granted by the faculty senate upon justification by the proposing department. Justification must include, but not be limited to, documentary evidence of the following:

(A) Standards established by a national accrediting organization for the program. The accreditation process must accredit the program, not the student.

(B) Programs of similar content and size offered at comparable institutions of higher education.

(C) Contemporary employment practices in the involved profession.

(2) General Education Requirements. The general education requirements must be completed by all bachelor's degree recipients. The general education requirements with the exception of the culminating experience must be completed by all associate of arts degree receipts.

(3) New degree types: The description, specifications, and requirements of a new degree type and level are to be determined by the FSCC (CWUR 2-50-070).

(4) Graduate Degrees

(A) Master of Arts (M.A.). The Master of Arts degree designation is appropriate for those graduate study programs in the arts, humanities and certain social science areas as determined by the graduate council.

(B) Master of Science (M.S.). The Master of Science degree designation is appropriate for those graduate study programs in the sciences, mathematics, certain social sciences and other fields not covered by the Master of Arts or other professional degree designations.

(C) Master of Education (M.Ed.) The Master of Education is used in a professional area with a distinct professional practice emphasis.

(D) Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) The Master of Fine Arts is recognized as the terminal degree in the creative arts, such as fine arts/studio art, poetry, creative writing, play/screenwriting, film as well as theatrical acting, design and direction. The M.F.A. degree indicates a high level of professional competence in the discipline and the mastery of a particular medium and/or creative art form. The 90-credit degree program is comprised of concentrated study in a creative discipline, bolstered by advanced study of the discipline’s history and criticism, literature, other related electives, and most often culminating in a studio/thesis project.

(E) Master of Music (M.M.). The Master of Music is a professional graduate degree in the musical arts. The course of study is divided into three components. The student must complete a minimum of one-third of study in a specific major in the discipline (ex. composition, performance, music education, conducting, etc.); one-third in supportive courses in music; and one-third of elective studies in supportive areas.

(F) Master of Professional Accountancy (M.P.A.)

(G) Master of Arts for Teachers (M.A.T.)

(H) Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) The Master of Public Health (MPH) degree is a professional graduate degree in public health and population health sciences. The course of study is comprised of:

1. foundational and specialized content courses, and

2. applied experiences in public health research or practice.

(I) Master of Applied Science (M.A.S.). The Master of Applied Science is a graduate degree designed for programs with curriculum focused on applied knowledge and research in a scientific, technical, or professional field.

(J) Educational Specialist degree (Ed.S), The Educational Specialist degree is a terminal academic degree providing training above the master’s degree level, but below the doctoral level. Specialist programs generally involve two years of coursework and practica followed by an intensive internship. Specialist programs typically require in excess of 90-quarter hours of coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree, or approximately 45-quarter hours beyond a masters degree.

(5) Undergraduate Degrees

(A) Bachelor of Arts (B.A.). The Bachelor of Arts degree designation is reserved for those undergraduate programs which consist primarily of liberal arts study. They include approximately one-third study of general education, one-third study in a specialization, and one-third study in free electives. Majors may not exceed 75 quarter credits, unless approved by the faculty senate, and the minimum number of credits required for the degree is 180 including 60 credits of upper-division course work.

(B) Bachelor of Science (B.S.). The Bachelor of Science degree designation is reserved for those undergraduate programs which emphasize the study of science, or a technical or professional field. They include the general education requirements, a specialization and free elective courses. Majors may not exceed 110 quarter credits unless approved by the faculty senate. Usually the recipient of the B.S. is ready for immediate entrance into a career in the field of specialization. The minimum number of credits required for the degree is 180 including 60 credits of upper-division course work.

(C) Bachelor of Arts in Education (B.A.Ed.). The Bachelor of Arts in Education degree designation is reserved for undergraduate programs which are intended to prepare teachers. They include the general education requirements, major/minor, professional education study, and free elective courses. The minimum number of credits required for the degree is 180 including 60 credits of upper-division course work.

(D) Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.). The Bachelor of Music degree designation is reserved for those undergraduate programs which are intended to prepare students for professional careers in music. They include the general education requirements, a specialization, and free elective courses. Majors shall be limited according to the policy governing professional degrees. The minimum number of credits required for the degree is 180 including 60 credits of upper-division course work.

(E) Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.). The Bachelor of Fine Arts is the initial professional degree in art and design. It is designed to prepare students for significant roles in society as professional practitioners, educators and designers of visual art and associated media. The B.F.A. also prepares art students for graduate study in visual art and its allied fields of study. The degree is comprised of a general education component, a specialization in graphic design or studio art, and free electives. Students are required to complete 180 credits of course work including 60 credits of upper-division course work.

(F) Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.). The Bachelor of Applied Science degree designation is reserved for those undergraduate programs that emphasize an applied technical or professional field. They include upper division general education requirements, a specialization in a major, and electives. Majors may not exceed 110 quarter credits unless approved by the faculty senate. Usually the recipient of the B.A.S. has an applied technical degree from a community college. The minimum number of credits required for the degree is 180 including 60 credits of upper-division course work.

(6) Associate of Arts Degree (A.A)

(A) The Associate of Arts degree offers a foundation of general education supplemented with elective or introductory major courses.

1. Students are required to complete 90 credits of course work.

2. Credits from courses taken at the 400-level may not be applied towards completion of the AA degree.

(B) The degree is composed of a general education component (with the exception of the culminating experience credits), and free elective courses.

(C) No discipline- or interdisciplinary-specific associate of arts programs will be offered.

(7)  Listing Program Requirements

(A) All courses required for a major, minor, certificate, or graduate course of study, including prerequisites and specific general education courses, must be listed as requirements in the course of study and the credits must be included in the degree program total. Completion of academic writing I, quantitative reasoning, or any knowledge area within the general education program is exempt from this requirement. 

(B)  All pre-admission course requirements, including specific general education course, are to be listed as requirements in the course of study and the credits must be included in the degree program total. Completion of academic writing I, quantitative reasoning, or any knowledge area within the general education program is exempt from this requirement. 

(C)  All majors that require a specific minor or certificate are required to list the number of credits for that minor or certificate in their course of study for the major degree program and include them in the credit total.

(D)  Majors that require minors or additional credits that are not specified must include catalog information that informs students of the additional requirements and the possible credit impact on their degrees.

(E)  All teaching majors are required to list the Professional Education Program, or approved alternative program, credits in the course of study for the major degree program and include them in the credit total.

[07/2009; Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/Executive VP for Academic Affairs; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 04/29/2014; 06/03/18; 04/06/2019; 06/20/2023 12/12/2023, 03/26/24; Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 06/04/2014; 06/13/18; 2/20/2019; 06/12/2019; 06/14/2023; 08/02/2023; 02/14/2024; 05/29/2024; Approved by: A. James L. Wohlpart, President]

 

CWUP 5-50-080 Teacher Certification Programs

The Teacher Certification Program is administered through the college of education and professional studies (CEPS), the school of education (SOE), and the teacher education executive council (TEEC).  All programs leading to a teaching certificate and endorsements must meet current Washington State requirements.  Additionally, all teacher preparation majors and minors must conform to the credit requirements appropriate for the degree.  Programs leading to teaching certification require the successful completion of the Professional Education Program (PEP) in addition to the endorsement program.  Any course substitution or alternative program to the PEP must be defined in a written formal agreement (Memorandum of Understanding) and approved by the curriculum, supervision and education leadership department (CSEL), TEEC, the executive director of the school of education, and the dean of CEPS.  To ensure the quality and integrity of the certification process, all approved course substitutions and alternative programs must be reviewed and go through the school of education approval process every four years.  

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic & Student Life; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council: 04/04/2017; 08/09/2016 Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 04/19/2017; 10/21/2016; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

CWUP 5-50-090 Certificate Program

Undergraduate Certificate Program

Undergraduate certificate programs are courses of study that normally require less than one-quarter of the credits required during a degree program at a similar level. Certificate programs may not exceed 44 credits. They are usually highly specialized career programs and are occasionally geared for admission to licensing or career entrance tests.

Certificate programs are prescribed courses of study designed (a) to provide a specialty within an academic program or (b) to build competency in an applied field of study. Because many students and employers place high value on such programs that do not necessarily constitute or require a four-year academic program, Central Washington University has developed three types of undergraduate professional certificate programs.

Graduate Studies Certificate Program

Graduate certificate programs are courses of study that require equal to half or less than half of the credits required during a degree program at a similar level. Certificate programs may not exceed 44 credits. They are usually limited in scope relative to a graduate degree program but provide an opportunity for advanced study with a particular focus. Subject to the regulations that govern a specific program, a graduate certificate can often serve as an intermediate accomplishment for a student whose ultimate goal is a graduate degree.

Teacher certification programs differ from graduate certificate programs. CWUP 5-50-080 defines the administration of the teacher certification programs. The school of graduate studies and research does not administer teacher certification programs.

Types of Certificate Programs

Four types of programs are described and the characteristics listed that determine the placement of a program into one of the four categories. The primary characteristics that determine the classification of the certificate program are (a) the primary target audience and (b) the type of courses offered within certificate requirements. The type of certificate program offered determines the unit of primary responsibility for the program and the review process required for implementation and/or revision. It also determines the type of credit that can be awarded and determines the unit charged with the responsibility of maintaining ongoing records.

(1) Type A. College Sponsored Undergraduate Certificate Programs: Programs that admit only matriculating students and offer a set of courses approved through the CWU academic governance procedures are classified as “College Sponsored Certificate Programs.” These programs are developed, taught, and offered by academic departments housed in colleges at CWU.

 (2) Type B. Collaborative Undergraduate Certificate Programs: Programs that admit both matriculating students and non-matriculating students and offer a set of courses that includes regular course offerings appearing in the CWU catalog and administered by CWU Colleges are classified as “Collaborative Certificate Programs.” These programs are developed, taught, and offered by academic departments housed in colleges in cooperation with the office of continuing education.

(3) Type C. Continuing Education Certificate Programs: Programs that target primarily non-matriculating students and offer a set of instructional experiences developed independent of CWU’s colleges but with input as appropriate from faculty are classified as “continuing education certificate programs.” These programs are developed, delivered, and administered by the office of continuing education in consultation with faculty, academic departments, and/or college dean, as appropriate.

(4) Type D. Graduate School Certificate Programs: Programs that only admit students who meet the criteria to be accepted into the School of Graduate Studies and Research and offer a set of courses which appear in the CWU catalog. Certificates are administered by CWU Colleges and are classified as “Graduate School Certificate Programs”. These programs are developed, taught, and offered by academic departments housed in colleges at CWU.

[Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic Affairs; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 05/05/2015; 06/20/2023; Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 06/03/2015; 06/17/2020; 08/02/2023; Approved by: A. James Wohlpart, President]

CWUP 5-50-100 Programs

(1) Programs are clusters of courses and/or groupings of teaching and research faculty organized by academic interest.

(2) Interdisciplinary Programs

An interdisciplinary program is one in which the subject matter and faculty expertise is broader than any single discipline, and in which the core curriculum integrates knowledge from multiple fields.  This discipline mix is typically reflected in curricula that emphasize upper division course work from several departments or programs and interdepartmental faculty collaboration.

(3) Program Residence

Interdisciplinary programs reside in the college in which the preponderance of instruction is situated.  This is determined by the distribution of upper-division credits required by the program, assigned to each college on a pro rata basis.

[07/2009; Responsibility: Faculty Senate; Authority: Provost/VP for Academic & Student Life; Reviewed/Endorsed by Provost’s Council 04/29/2014: Cabinet/UPAC; Review/Effective Date: 06/04/2014; Approved by: James L. Gaudino, President]

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