CWUCWU NewsCWU Newshttps://www.cwu.edu/newsen-usKittitas students to learn about entrepreneurship from CWU College of Businesshttps://www.cwu.edu/node/94902Thu, 18 Oct 2018 17:17:13<p><img alt="2017 I4IE entrepreneurship event" src="/sites/default/files/Entrepreneurship.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 300px; margin: 3px; float: right;">Nearly three dozen <a href="https://kss.ksd403.org/" target="_blank">Kittitas High School </a>students are expected to participate in an entrepreneurship workshop on Friday, October 19, conducted by the CWU <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/business/i4ie" target="_blank">Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I4IE)</a>.</p><p>This is the fourth year of the program, spearheaded by <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/business/" target="_blank">College of Business</a> (CB) students and faculty.</p><p>“Every year we try to add a new component to make it more valuable to the high school students,” said <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/business/bill-provaznik" target="_blank">Bill Provaznik, I4IE director</a>. “It’s for any student interested in design, business, or project management. Some of the students will be from the school’s High Capacity program, others from DECA Inc. and Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda, and there will be some who won’t be affiliated with any student club or organization.”&nbsp;</p><p>Provaznik, who also serves as chair of the CWU CB&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cwu.edu/management/" target="_blank">Department of Management</a>, said about two dozen CWU students will help lead the workshop.</p><p>The competition will involve 8-12-member student teams, put together on the day of the competition, with the goal to help them develop the primary skills that entrepreneurs universally need, beyond simply business skills.</p><p>“Entrepreneurs need to communicate, collaborate, understand what people need, and try to develop solutions that are viable and valuable enough that customers will buy them,” Provaznik explained. “So, the high school students get a chance to try their hands at all of those things in a live simulation.”</p><p>Half of each of the student teams will comprise the marketing unit. The other half will be product designers. The simulation they will work on involves developing pet-containment units.</p><p>“People are very partial to their pets—and can express their personalities through their pets, on occasion,” Provaznik state. “Our student entrepreneurs will need to find out who these pet owners are, and what their needs are, in terms of their pets. We will have stuffed animals there with their owners. So, the students will have to design and present their ideas for the best containment units.”</p><p>The “pet owners” for the competition are actually celebrities in their own rights, Provaznik noted, listing Edgar Allan Poe, with his raven; the Man with the Yellow Hat, and Curious George, the monkey; SpongeBob SquarePants, with his pet snail, Gary; and Emily Elizabeth, with Clifford the Big Red Dog, as among the pet owners. The variety of pets represented is by design.</p><p>“A mistake that a lot of new entrepreneurs and established business owners commit is they try to make a one-size fits all product, which makes everyone uniformly unsatisfied,” Provaznik said. “When you try to be good at everything, that ensures that you’re not really good at anything in particular.”&nbsp;</p><p>The college student mentors will help the high school student groups negotiate and navigate the inherent challenges when units within an organization each have good ideas, but the ideas are not necessarily the same, which can lead to conflict.&nbsp;</p><p>“Many of our students are in the entrepreneurship program here [at CWU],” Provaznik pointed out. “They really enjoy working with the next generation, and helping them learn, absorb, and use some marketing and design concepts, costing and finance, and basic communication skills.”&nbsp;</p><p>The Kittitas High event is a precursor to the larger “<a href="https://www.cwu.edu/business/many-faces-entrepreneurship" target="_blank">Many Faces of Entrepreneurship</a>” tournament that will take place November 16 at the Yakima County Fairgrounds, Yakima. It will involve high school students from throughout south-central Washington.</p><p>Both events are supported by the <a href="http://www.hbjfoundation.com/" target="_blank">Herbert B. Jones Foundation</a>.</p><p><strong>Media contact: </strong>Robert Lowery, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p>CWU “Latinx ‘Firsts’” Topic for Oct. 25 Roundtable Discussionhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/94901Thu, 18 Oct 2018 14:24:15<p>What is it like to be the first member of your community to hold public office? How does it<img alt="Being the First Poster" src="/sites/default/files/images/Being%20the%20First%20Poster.jpg" style="width: 150px; height: 232px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 3px; float: right;"> feel to be the only person of color to attain a position of governmental authority? Last spring, 12 Central Washington University students sought to answer these questions by interviewing Latinx pioneers in public service.</p><p>The students gained insights from federal and state judges, lawyers, victim advocates, and other public servants. Some were highly-recognizable public figures including Chief Justice Ricardo Martinez, the first Latino judge in the U.S. District Court for western Washington and Justice Mary Yu, the first Latina and first openly-LGBTQ person appointed to the Washington State Supreme Court.</p><p>Join the student researchers for a roundtable discussion entitled, “Being the ‘First’: Latinx Pioneers in Public Service” on October 25 at 5:30 p.m. in the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment.</p><p><img alt="Students standing next to Guadalupe Gamboa" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Latinx%20Firsts.jpg" style="font-family: -webkit-standard; width: 250px; height: 327px; margin: 3px; float: left;">The conversation will consider the importance of culture and tradition in shaping values and ethics, as well as barriers created by racism and other forms of discrimination. Moreover, with Latinx people running for public office in increasing numbers—particularly in the 2018 election—what will the new generation of Latinx “firsts” experience?&nbsp; And what did these CWU students learn from those who came before? &nbsp;</p><p><em>Latinx Firsts in Public Service</em>, the new Window on Central exhibition, will also be on display.</p><p>For more information visit <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum" target="_blank">www.cwu.edu/museum</a> or email museum@cwu.edu, or call the gallery at 509-963-2313. The MCE is free and open to the public Wednesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.&nbsp; Parking on CWU campus is free after 4:30 p.m. and on Saturdays.</p><p><em><strong>Pictured above:</strong></em> <em>CWU students Yasmeen Herrera-Flores and Samantha Saavedra stand next to lawyer and Washington State Human Rights Commissioner Guadalupe Gamboa</em>.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, Dawn.Alford@cwu.edu</p>Samuelson Hall Grand Opening on October 19https://www.cwu.edu/node/94570Tue, 16 Oct 2018 17:58:31<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/samuelson_hall_cwu-1350.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 231px;"></p><p>After being shuttered for more than a decade, the $64.5 million Samuelson Hall is open for business.</p><p>With funding from the 2015 state legislature, demolition of the old Samuelson began in May 2016. The 57,750 square-foot south wing was demolished and replaced with new construction, while the 49,250-foot north wing underwent a major reconstruction.</p><p>An opening ceremony will be held at 3:00 p.m. on October 19. Public tours of the building will be held from 3:30 to 6:00 p.m., following the ceremony.</p><p>“The new Samuelson Hall is clear demonstration of Central Washington University’s continuing commitment to provide the best and most cutting edge educational facilities to our students,” said CWU President James L. Gaudino. “The building is a showcase for our highest-demand STEM programs and provides an amazing teaching, learning and research facility for our students and faculty.”</p><p>The renovated Samuelson building is an integrated computer science technology center housing the departments of Computer Science, Sociology, Mathematics, and Information Technology and Administrative Management (ITAM).</p><p>The new structure also contains the office of Multimodal Learning, which is integral to CWU’s digital class offerings and other distance education options, and the campus data center. Other building features include state-of-the-art classrooms and lecture halls, a Turing supercomputer, a new robotics laboratory, a new cyberwarfare laboratory, and a digital sandbox for active learning.</p><p>The new Samuelson was built with the highest standards of energy efficiency according to LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, the most widely used green building rating system in the world. Washington state requires public buildings to meet a minimum silver LEED certification; CWU is hoping that Samuelson will achieve LEED gold.</p><p>“The building is very energy efficient with the use of LED lights, automatic lighting controls, and heat recovery systems,” said Doug Ryder, University Facilities planning officer and Samuelson project director. “The interior materials and finishes were selected to be durable and environmentally friendly, such as bamboo flooring, low VOC paint, and polished concrete floors.</p><p>A Building in Suspended Animation<br>Vacated since 2006, the old Samuelson Union Building was a patchwork of remodeling and additions that were constructed between 1928 and 1967.</p><p>“It was like an archeological dig, stripping away the various ‘strata’ of old Samuelson,” Ryder commented. “Like seeing a history of construction methods and materials throughout the past 80 years.”</p><p>In 1926, when CWU’s student body numbered in the hundreds, the College Union Building provided a central place for student to gather and socialize. The $42,000 structure housed a gymnasium, and served as the home of student government. Later the gym was converted to a ballroom, where students danced to swing bands in the 50s, and rocked out to pop bands in the 60s. From 1967 to 2006, it housed student clubs, the Student Union and Recreation Center and later, the college bookstore.</p><p>As with all new buildings, Samuelson received artwork funded through the state of Washington’s Art in Public Places program. The program, created in 1974, allocates a percentage of the building's construction costs for art to be installed on the site of a publicly funded structure.</p><p>Sculptor Ilan Averbuch created a massive work that frames the eastern entrance of Samuelson. “Mammoth” is a large-scale installation of a woolly mammoth tusk that appears to go under the sidewalk. It alludes to the mammoth fragment in the collection of the university, and according to the artist, “creates a visual metaphor for the scientific advancements made from that discovery [and] evokes a spiritual and intellectual search into the past to understand who we are and our place in the universe.” The artwork was installed in July.</p><p>Averbuch is a sculptor who grew up in Israel, and attended university in England and the United States. His artworks are mainly large-scale outdoor sculptures, made from raw materials such as stone and wood, as well as metals and glass. In his own words, his art “involves the recycling of images and materials, moving from one time span to another.”</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p></p style="text-align: center;"></br>Where to Watch the 8th Congressional District Debatehttps://www.cwu.edu/node/94404Tue, 16 Oct 2018 08:48:01<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/Debate%20Banner%2010-15-18.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;"></p><p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">There are other options for those not able to snag a ticket for the upcoming 8<sup>th</sup> Congressional District debate to be held at 7 p.m. on October 17 in McConnell Hall on the campus of Central Washington University.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">The hour-long debate, which will feature Republican candidate Dino Rossi and Democratic candidate Kim Shrier, will be the only meeting between the two candidates prior to the November 6 election.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">The Washington Debate Coalition, which organized the event, has announced the debate will be broadcast live at 7 p.m. on KING 5 television and on KVI Seattle (570 AM), KTTH Seattle (770 AM), KUOW Seattle (94.9 FM), and KPQ Wenatchee (560 AM) on radio. It will also be livestreamed on KIRO 7 television, NCWLIFE Channel, and many other Washington Debate Coalition partner websites.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Additionally, it will be broadcast on a delay on KOMO Seattle (1000 AM and 97.7 FM) radio, KCTS 9 television, and TVW.org. For an updated list of media partners, go to: wadebates.org.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: Times;mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">At CWU, the debate can be viewed on monitors set up in the Pit area of the Student Union and Recreation Center (SURC) on the CWU campus.</span></p><p style="text-align: center;"> <style type="text/css"> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073732485 9 0 511 0;} @font-face {font-family:Times; panose-1:2 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536858881 -1073711013 9 0 511 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Times; mso-fareast-font-family:Times; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Times; mso-ascii-font-family:Times; mso-fareast-font-family:Times; mso-hansi-font-family:Times;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --></style> </p></p style="text-align: center;"></p style="text-align: center;"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: Times;mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language: AR-SA"></p style="text-align: center;">CWU Marks Breast Cancer Awareness Monthhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/94238Mon, 15 Oct 2018 14:50:32<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/logo.jpg" style="width: 150px; height: 171px; margin: 3px; float: left;">In the United States, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetimes. That is among the reasons why, since 1985, October has been designated annually as Breast Cancer Awareness Month.</p><p>It’s a bittersweet occasion for CWU chemistry department office manager Lisa Stowe. In 2006, she found herself among that lamentable group. A 1993 CWU alumna, has served in the chemistry department since 1999.&nbsp;</p><p>Stowe is a vocal champion for breast self-exams and patient medical self-advocacy. A bit of her survivor’s story was featured on the big screen during the 12th annual Tough Enough to Wear Pink campaign, which supports awareness of breast cancer, early detection and funding for research, at this year’s Ellensburg Rodeo.</p><p><iframe class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="390" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oUknyHqo_mI?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>“It’s not a harder month, per se, but it does bring up tons of memories,” Stowe said. “I’m just more aware since breast cancer is recognized nationally during October. I have an immense amount of gratitude for the strides made in diagnostics and treatment options related to it.”</p><p>Initially, during her monthly self-exam, Stowe found a small lump that she described as “the size of a pea.” Three months later, ironically enough in October, an official diagnosis was announced. It indicated Stowe had aggressive, rapidly advancing breast cancer.</p><p>“My life was forever changed by the diagnosis,” she noted. “It drove home to me the fact that life is fragile, we never know how much time we have or when it will end, so living in and valuing each moment is so important.”</p><p>A lumpectomy soon followed the diagnosis to remove the tumor and, as a precaution, for extraction of 24 additional lymph nodes. That led to six chemotherapy treatments and 35 additional therapy sessions involving radiation.</p><p>“Treatment was a long road–from surgery to completion of radiation it was nine months–so it was a great relief to be finished and start trying to find my new normal,” said Stowe. “But the time away also reinforced for me what an amazing community we have on the CWU campus. Students rallied around me and encouraged me to keep fighting. They missed me in the chemistry office, but wanted me to be well before I returned.”</p><p>Other staff on campus donated sick and vacation leave, through the university’s shared leave program, so Stowe did not miss a single paycheck.</p><p>“That kind of selfless generosity and support was so humbling and appreciated more than words can ever describe,” she continued. “How can I ever repay that?”&nbsp;</p><p>She also described a poignant gesture when she received a dozen roses from former CWU President, Jerilyn S. McIntyre, upon completion of her treatment.&nbsp;</p><p>“That personal connection is why I came to CWU as a student and chose to work here after graduation,” Stowe continued.</p><p>While back working on campus, she has adopted an additional lifetime mission to see cancer eradicated. Those efforts have included participation in and helping coordinate the local American Cancer Society’s annual Relay For Life fundraiser.</p><p>In addition, she is the driving force behind the annual Concert for a Cure event featuring the CWU chemistry department band: Road Fever.</p><p>“Concert for a Cure was actually the brainchild of our chemistry students,” Stowe explained. “They saw what I was going through, loved the band and wanted to find a way to make a difference.”</p><p>The $5 cover charge and all monies collected during the performance are donated to the Kittitas County-based <a href="https://gretchenwellerfoundation.com/" target="_blank">Gretchen Weller Foundation</a>.</p><p>“It’s a perfect fit,” Stowe said. “As a non-profit foundation, its mission is to assist financially with non-medical expenses to help lift the burden off of the cancer patient and their families.”&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Next year will mark the 12th annual concert.</p><p>“I love the legacy that is there and the fact that we keep giving back to our community in this fun way,” Stowe added. “In last year’s event alone, we collected and donated more than $8,000 to the Gretchen Weller Foundation.”</p><p>Breast cancer is not a disease confined by gender. While it’s more than 100-times less than for women, the lifetime risk for men of developing breast cancer is still about 1 in 833. Some 2,500 new cases of breast cancer among men are predicted by the American Cancer Society this year alone. In addition, male survival rates are reported to be lower than for women.</p><p><strong>Media contact: </strong>Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p>CWU to Participate in ShakeOut Earthquake Drill on Oct. 18https://www.cwu.edu/node/94237Mon, 15 Oct 2018 13:23:25<p>Would you know what three immediate actions you need to take to save your life in the event of an earthquake?</p><p>Central Washington University is participating in the annual Great ShakeOut, the world’s largest<img alt="Drop Cover Hold On " src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/images/Drop%20Cover%20Hold%20On.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 183px; margin: 3px; float: right;"> earthquake drill, to educate its students and community on “<a href="https://www.shakeout.org/washington/dropcoverholdon/" target="_blank">Drop! Cover! Hold On!</a>” The emergency preparedness drill focuses on educating people about best practices for surviving an earthquake.</p><p>The ShakeOut Earthquake Drill is scheduled for 10:18 a.m. on October 18. This means that wherever you are at that moment—at home, at work, at school, anywhere—you should Drop, Cover, and Hold On as if a major earthquake had occurred at that very moment. You should stay in this position for at least 60 seconds.</p><p>Central will use the ShakeOut to test CWU Alert!, Central’s emergency alert system. CWU Alert! combines the technologies of text messaging, e-mail, and telephone messages to be sent instantly to campus community subscribers whenever there is a campus emergency. CWU Alert! is immediately activated when an incident poses an imminent threat to the safety of the community.</p><p><iframe class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="390" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/1sbkSfQa69Q?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>This year, 57 million registered participants worldwide, including 1.1 million in Washington state, will participate in the ShakeOut. For more information about the ShakeOut, go to <a href="https://www.shakeout.org/washington" target="_blank">shakeout.org/washington</a>.</p><p>Media Contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu</p>CWU Trustees to Meet in Ellensburghttps://www.cwu.edu/node/94236Mon, 15 Oct 2018 08:27:12<p>The Central Washington University Board of Trustees will meet October 22 (Mon.) in Ellensburg,<img alt="CWU Medallion" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/images/CWU_Medallion-RGB%28latest%29.jpg" style="width: 150px; height: 150px; margin: 3px; float: right;"> WA. The meeting will be held in the Sid Morrison Executive Board Room, Barge Hall, room 412. On October 21, trustees will attend a social dinner. No university business will be discussed at the dinner.</p><p>The business meeting will begin at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, October 22, and will include a public comment period.</p><p>Rules pertaining to the public comment period are also available at www.cwu.edu/trustees. To participate in the public comment period, speakers must identify themselves and the topic to be addressed via e-mail to cwu.president@cwu.edu by Wednesday, October 17, at 5:00 p.m.</p><p>Trustees will meet in executive session for lunch from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. as allowed under RCW 42.30.110 (b), (c), and (i). After the executive session, board members who would like to are invited to view progress on construction projects on the north side of campus. No business will be conducted during this tour.</p><p>To view the agenda, visit www.cwu.edu/trustees and click on Agendas. Under “Featured Meetings” click Oct 22, 2018, BOT Agenda to review meeting presentation materials.<br><br>Media contact: Linda Schactler, chief of staff and secretary to the board,<br>509-963-1384, schactler@cwu.edu.</p></br></br></br>Central Washington University Hosts 8th Congressional District Debate on October 17https://www.cwu.edu/node/93740Fri, 12 Oct 2018 09:04:45<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/Debate%20banner%20copy.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 81px;"></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">The only debate scheduled between 8<sup>th</sup> Congressional District candidates Dino Rossi (R) and Kim Schrier (D) will be held at 7 p.m. on October 17 at McConnell Hall on the Central Washington University campus.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">The hour-long event, sponsored by the Washington State Debate Coalition, will be broadcast and livestreamed statewide. Moderators for the debates are Natalie Brand (KING 5) and Ross Reynolds (KUOW).</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">“It’s a great honor to host the only debate between the two candidates for the 8<sup>th</sup> Congressional District, which is one of the most highly-contested congressional races in the country,” said CWU President James L. Gaudino. “We know there is great interest in this election because this is seen as one of the key contests that may help decide which political party has control of the House of Representatives.”</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">While seating in McConnell Hall is no longer available, the debate can be viewed live on KING 5 television and will be livestreamed at TVW.org. Additionally, television monitors showing the debate will be available in the Pit area of the Student Union and Recreation Center (SURC) on the CWU campus.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">Joining CWU in co-hosting the 8<sup>th</sup> Congressional District debate are the Associated Students of Central Washington University, Cle-Elum Roslyn School District, Ellensburg Daily Record, Easton School District, Ellensburg School District, Kittitas Chamber of Commerce, Kittitas School District, and Thorp School District.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">The coalition, founded by the Seattle City Club in 2016, seeks to increase the frequency and quality of publicly accessible nonpartisan debates in Washington.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">In addition to the 8<sup>th</sup> Congressional District debate, the coalition is sponsoring a debate between U.S. Senate candidates Maria Cantwell (D) and Susan Hutchison (R) at Gonzaga University on October 30.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">Media contact: Richard Moreno, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-2714, Richard.Moreno@cwu.edu.</span></p><p> <style type="text/css"> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073697537 9 0 511 0;} @font-face {font-family:Times; 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margin:1.5in .6in .5in .6in; mso-header-margin:.05in; mso-footer-margin:.45in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --></style> </p></p style="text-align: center;"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">Dean of the College of Business Candidateshttps://www.cwu.edu/node/93574Thu, 11 Oct 2018 15:31:38<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/CB%20Logo%20Cropped.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 142px; margin: 2px; float: right;">CWU is pleased to announce the finalists for the Dean of the College of Business. Open forums with each candidate are scheduled for:</p><p><br><strong>Natasha Delcoure</strong><br>Open Forum: Monday, October 15 from 8:30-9:30 a.m. in Shaw 115</p><p><br><strong>Linda Yu</strong><br>Open Forum: Thursday, October 18 from 8:30-9:30 a.m. in Shaw 115</p><p><br><strong>Jeff Stinson</strong><br>Open Forum: Thursday, October 25 from 8:30-9:30 a.m. in Shaw 115</p><p><br><strong>Keng Siau</strong><br>Open Forum: Monday, October 29 from 8:30-9:30 a.m. in Shaw 115</p><p>To view candidate application letters and CVs go to: <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/hr/cob-candidates">https://www.cwu.edu/hr/cob-candidates</a></p></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br>New CWU Master of Public Health Enhances Opportunities for Health Professionalshttps://www.cwu.edu/node/93408Wed, 10 Oct 2018 15:16:29<p>Central Washington University is now offering a new Master of Public Health (MPH) degree to help health professionals advance their careers</p><p>“The Master of Public Health is one of the most sought-after practical degrees in the health sector,” said Tishra Beeson, assistant professor, CWU Department of Health Sciences and graduate program director for public health. “Our program is unique because it focuses on helping students be a part of improving the health of the communities we serve right here in rural Washington. We focus on engaging students in meaningful collaboration with and among community members, in an effort to advance health equity and social justice wherever students choose to work.”</p><p>The two-year, 56-credit program is designed to serve place-and time-bound students with flexible course offerings including distance education, online, intensive, and hybrid classes. The curriculum offers students the opportunity to select from a variety of elective courses, allowing each student to customize their specialized area of interest – from maternal and child health, to environmental justice, to grant seeking and administration.</p><p>“This degree will open doors for students in a variety of settings, including local, state, and federal agencies, health care delivery systems, and private corporations,” Beeson continued. “Public health has connections to every person, place, and population.”</p><p>For more information about the Master of Public Health, visit www.cwu.edu/health-science/public-health.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br></br>