CWUCWU NewsCWU Newshttps://www.cwu.edu/newsen-usEdmonds CC, CWU-Lynnwood celebrate inaugural first-generation college student weekhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/103384Mon, 10 Dec 2018 14:23:31<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/view_file-medium.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px; margin: 2px;"></p><p>Edmonds CC President Dr. Amit Singh and CWU-Lynnwood Regional Director Shane Reeder signed a declaration dedicating the first week of November each year as First-Generation College Student Week.</p><p>During the kickoff event, attendees heard the stories of first-generation student speakers, including CWU-Lynnwood student and Edmonds CC alumni Anthony Esposo and Edmonds CC student Jasmine Warner Banks.</p><p>Read the entire story<a href="https://www.edcc.edu/news/stories/article/219"> here</a>.</p></p style="text-align: center;">Game On! Delegation From CWU Travels to Spainhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102723Thu, 06 Dec 2018 11:15:04<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Group of men on a soccer field" src="/sites/default/files/pictures/2018-04-2018%20Formacion%20Entrenadores%20Futbol%20%28escuelas%20fundacion%2914.jpg" style="width: 800px; height: 440px; margin: 3px;"></p><p>Representatives of Central Washington University’s innovative Game On! program were the only participants from the United States to attend the Real Madrid’s Foundation (RMF) training and coaching camp in Madrid, Spain, last month.</p><p>The RMF sponsored 10 coaches from five countries including two from CWU.</p><p><a href="https://www.cwu.edu/game-on/" target="_blank">CWU’s Game On!</a> is a partnership between the Real Madrid Foundation, Microsoft, and CWU that combines the excitement of world class soccer and the secret language of computer coding with higher education attainment. Game On! creates a unique opportunity for middle- and high school students from economically-disadvantaged communities.</p><p>CWU Game On! Executive Director Manuel Rodriguez and Program Coordinator Domingo Alcala, who also serve as Game On! coaches, spent five days at the camp with their counterparts from India, Angola, England, and Bahrain.</p><p>It was the first time CWU staff were selected to travel to Spain for training. The camp reinforced the coaches’ knowledge through new instruction while also exposing them to schools in Madrid. CWU was invited to be part of the training based on program performance and referrals.</p><p>“Our participation can be attributed to the strong advocacy of Spanish Consulate Luis Fernando,” said Sharon O’Hare, CWU vice president for strategic enrollment management. “The Consulate was instrumental in CWU’s partnership with the Real Madrid Foundation from the beginning and continues to support Game On! and its mission.”</p><p>The international soccer powerhouse, Real Madrid, through its foundation, gives back to society with social and cultural programs. The RMF partners with organizations around the globe to help underprivileged kids build social skills and values through sport.</p><p>In prior years, participating school district employees and volunteers learned youth coaching techniques from Spanish Real Madrid Foundation coaches, who visit Central Washington each fall.</p><p>“We are eager to share the latest in coaching techniques while building on our already successful program,” Rodriguez said.</p><p>Since the program start in spring 2016, 358 underrepresented students have participated, and 19 have pursued higher education. By the end of the 2019 school year, CWU plans to increase Game On! to more than 500 students in Yakima, Ellensburg, Mabton, Wenatchee, and Quincy.</p><p><iframe class="youtube-player" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/CLiPEkm1_vQ?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%" height="390" frameborder="0"></iframe></p><p><u>About Game On!</u><br>CWU coordinates Game On! meetings twice a week. Students learn coding for an hour and sharpen their leadership skills through soccer and social values for 90 minutes. CWU sponsors visits to the Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington, so students can see first-hand what a “big company” looks like.</p><p>Students also come to CWU’s campus where they see a “real” college campus and meet students and faculty who welcome them into a friendly educational future. Participants are overwhelmingly Hispanic and attend middle- and high-schools where 100 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced lunch.</p><p>To donate to Game On! or learn more about the program contact Manuel Rodriguez, Game On! executive director at 509-963-2216, Manuel.Rodriguez@cwu.edu.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p></p style="text-align: center;"></br>Consider Giving to the Annual Holiday Gift Project, Deadline is December 13https://www.cwu.edu/node/102557Wed, 05 Dec 2018 10:15:39<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/holiday%20gifts_0001.JPG" style="width: 600px; height: 398px;"></p><p>There’s still time to help make it a happy holiday season for everyone!</p><p>Gifts are still being accepted for CWU’s annual Holiday Gift Project, which serves hundreds of underserved children in Kittitas County.</p><p>Student, staff, and faculty can contribute to the effort, which allows participants to make personal and meaningful gifts directly to individual children by choosing items from the child’s own gift list. We still have more than 75 community youth who could use some extra help this season.</p><p>The gift drive will conclude on December 13 at 5 p.m., when all gifts need to be delivered to the Office of the President at 314 Barge Hall on the CWU campus. Since some requests are “needs” as much as “wants,” participants are urged to choose both a practical as well as a fun gift if possible.</p><p>For those who want to participate but don’t have time to shop, CWU’s elves accept cash donations and do the shopping.</p><p>The CWU Holiday Gift Project supports CWU’s Early Childhood Education Center, CWU’s Operation E.L.F., Kittitas County Bright Beginnings, and the Department of Children and Family Services.</p><p><a href="https://www.cwu.edu/president/holiday-gift-project">Please click here to sponsor one or more children or to donate to cover costs for unsponsored kids.</a></p><p> <style type="text/css"> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073732485 9 0 511 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman",serif; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; color:blue; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; color:#954F72; mso-themecolor:followedhyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;} p {mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman",serif; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --></style> </p></p style="text-align: center;">CWU Librarian Receives National ‘I Love My Librarian’ Public Service Honorhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102391Tue, 04 Dec 2018 10:51:55<p><strong>NEW YORK, NY</strong> – Ginny Blackson, Central Washington University collection development <img alt="Ginny Blackson" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/GinnyBlackson-headshot.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 290px; margin: 3px; float: right;">and management librarian at the James E. Brooks Library, was named a winner of this year’s I Love My Librarian Award. Blackson is one of only 10 librarians in the country to receive this national honor.</p><p>She is recognized for her leadership in transforming lives and communities through education and lifelong learning.</p><p>Blackson is commended for spearheading numerous projects that have moved library services into new and exciting areas with a concerted focus on inclusion and diversity, including the creation of the <a href="https://youtu.be/YRgFLsXo4PU" target="_blank">Family Friendly Space</a> for library users with young children. She was instrumental in obtaining a Pride Foundation grant resulting in the acquisition of library materials covering LGBTQ issues.</p><p>In addition, she successfully acquired funding from the <a href="https://www.brooksfol.org/" target="_blank">Friends of the Library</a> to purchase materials representing Hispanic history and cultural issues. Among her other activities, Blackson leads the annual Women’s History Month initiative for the campus radio station, recruiting students, staff and faculty to record information about notable women in U.S. history.</p><p>“Every day I ask myself, ‘Am I serving our students?’ This award has really affirmed for me that the work my colleagues and I do is important and impactful,” Blackson said. “It is especially important for academic librarians to think outside the box to serve 21st century learners. I believe that everyone can be successful if given the support they need.”</p><p>Blackson will receive a $5,000 prize at an award ceremony and reception to be held this evening in New York City. The ceremony is hosted by Carnegie Corporation of New York, which co-sponsors the award along with The New York Public Library and The New York Times. The American Library Association administers the award through its Communications and Marketing Office, which promotes the value of libraries and librarians.</p><p>As part of the award process, library users are invited to nominate librarians working in public, school, college, community college and university libraries. This year library users submitted 1,083 nominations detailing how their favorite librarians have gone above and beyond to improve community members’ lives.</p><p>In the United States there are 160,000 librarians working in libraries of all types, and only 110 librarians have been selected for this distinguished honor since the award’s inception in 2008.</p><p>This year’s award recipients include four academic librarians, three public librarians and three school librarians. A complete list of the 2018 I Love My Librarian Award recipients can be found at <a href="http://.ilovelibraries.org/ilovemylibrarian" target="_blank">ilovelibraries.org/ilovemylibrarian</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><em>About Carnegie Corporation of New York</em><br>Carnegie Corporation of New York was established by Andrew Carnegie in 1911 “to promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding.” In keeping with this mandate, the Corporation's work focuses on the issues that Andrew Carnegie considered of paramount importance: international peace, the advancement of education and knowledge, and the strength of our democracy.</p><p><em>About The New York Public Library</em><br>The New York Public Library is a free provider of education and information for the people of New York and beyond. With 92 locations—including research and branch libraries—throughout the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island, the Library offers free materials, computer access, classes, exhibitions, programming and more to everyone from toddlers to scholars, and has seen record numbers of attendance and circulation in recent years. The New York Public Library serves more than 18 million patrons who come through its doors annually and millions more around the globe who use its resources at www.nypl.org. To offer this wide array of free programming, The New York Public Library relies on both public and private funding. Learn more about how to support the Library at nypl.org/support.</p><p><em>About the American Library Association</em><br>American Library Association (ALA) is the foremost national organization providing resources to inspire library and information professionals to transform their communities through essential programs and services. For more than 140 years, ALA has been the trusted voice of libraries, advocating for the profession and the library’s role in enhancing learning and ensuring access to information for all. For more information, visit ala.org. To contribute to support ALA’s work, visit ala.org/donate.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p></br></br></br>CWU Announces Hiring of New Associate Dean of Health and Wellnesshttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102387Tue, 04 Dec 2018 08:47:13<p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/Shawnte%CC%81%20Elbert.jpeg" style="width: 240px; height: 250px; margin: 2px; float: right;">Shawnté Elbert is Central Washington University’s first-ever Associate Dean of Health and Wellness. In her new position, Elbert will oversee the university’s counseling services, student medical services, wellness center, and the recreation center.</p><p>She will begin her job on January 2, 2019.</p><p>“We’re looking forward to having Shawnté join our student success team,” noted William Schafer, Interim Dean of Student Success. “She is an experienced health and wellness administrator who helped establish the Office of Health and Wellness Promotion at her previous school, so we’re confident she can hit the ground running.</p><p>“The Associate Dean of Health and Wellness is a new position that will help us create a culture, at CWU, that values health and wellness as key components of success for our students during their time at Central and beyond,” Schafer added.</p><p>“Making health and wellness a higher priority for the institution not only establishes a foundation of student excellence, but also recognizes the increasingly important role health and wellness play in our students’ lives,” Schafer said. “We established this new post in order to consolidate our health and wellness departments and improve our abilities to promote healthy living options.”</p><p>Prior to coming to CWU, Elbert served as the first Director of the Office of Health and Wellness Promotion at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) and was an associate faculty member for the Fairbanks School of Public Health and School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.</p><p>She earned a BS in Health Education &amp; Promotion at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina and an MA in Wellness from Chatham University in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. She is currently writing her dissertation as a doctoral student in the Educational Leadership and Management program at St. Thomas University in Florida.</p><p>“It has been a privilege to work in higher education my entire career,” Elbert said. “I find it particularly gratifying to be able to help students, staff, and faculty integrate wellness into the campus culture and their personal lives.”</p><p>At Central, Elbert will supervise 55 full- and part-time staff members in addition to more than 170 student employees. Her duties will include providing strategic direction for health and wellness at CWU and developing and implementing a new collaborative integrated wellness model for the university.</p><p>Media contact: Richard Moreno, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-2714, Richard.Moreno@cwu.edu.</p>CWU Student Photographer Snaps Win in National Competitionhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102386Mon, 03 Dec 2018 15:04:45<p>Central Washington University student photographer Zahn Schultz won first and third place<img alt="&quot;Gateway to the South&quot;" src="/sites/default/files/images/Gateway%20to%20the%20South2.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 375px; margin: 3px; float: right;"> in the 2018 College Media Shoot-out in Louisville, Kentucky. His first-place photo was ranked first by 12 of the 39 professional photographers, more than any single image in the last decade.</p><p>“We are really proud of our students,” said Francesco Somaini, journalism professor and associate chair of the <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/programs/communication#2884" target="_blank">communication studies department</a>. “The results that they achieve demonstrate how much effort they put into what they do and how good they become at the things they are learning here at Central.”</p><p>Schultz captured the winning photograph while walking in Louisville on a Thursday night. He witnessed a massive Trump float traveling down a sparsely populated street. On the float were people waving and holding signs while a man stood in the forefront waving a flag.</p><p>“We’re walking around downtown checking it out and started hearing this patriotic music playing,” Schultz said. “I had to get this because it just felt like it resonated with the competition theme, ‘Gateway to the South.’</p><p>Schultz, a film major and <em>PULSE Magazine’s</em> director of photography, attended the Associated College Press (ACP) national convention along with other <em>PULSE</em> staff. About 30 photographers competed in the competition, where each could submit two photos for judging.</p><p>His second entry, “Barbershop,” earned Schultz third place.</p><p>Schultz expressed his appreciation for the barbershop in contrast to the Trump float image.</p><p><iframe class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="390" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4X_IqSjC6cg?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe>“It showed that Louisville had a tight-knit sense of community and that the people know each other and you’re bringing people together—which is kind of a juxtaposition sometimes to some of the rhetoric that goes along with you know the political aspect of the other photo,” he said.</p><p>His new barbershop friends asked Schultz to send them copies of the next issue of PULSE where their photo is featured. Schultz said he was happy to oblige.</p><p>“If I wasn’t into taking photos, I wouldn’t have half the friends I have now,” admitted Schultz. And wouldn’t have had this experience and been able to meet John and everybody else in the barbershop.”</p><p><a href="https://issuu.com/cwupulse/docs/fall_2018_issue_two" target="_blank"><em>PULSE</em> Fall 2018, Issue Two</a> is now available featuring an article and photographs by Schultz.</p><p>For more information about <em>PULSE</em>, contact faculty adviser Jennifer Green at Jennifer.Green@cwu.edu, 509-963-3216.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, CWU Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, Dawn.Alford@cwu.edu.&nbsp;</p>CWU Awarded 2018 NEA Big Read Granthttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102385Mon, 03 Dec 2018 11:38:37<p>Central Washington University is one of only two organizations in Washington to receive a <img alt="To Live - book cover" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/images/To-Live-cover.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 386px; margin: 3px; float: right;">Big Read grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The $6,490 grant will support a broad range of NEA Big Read activities in Ellensburg in February and March of 2019.</p><p>In partnership with Arts Midwest, the NEA Big Read strives to bring together communities through the sharing of a common book. Ellensburg’s Big Read will focus on Yu Hua’s novel <em>To Live</em> (English translation by Michael Berry).</p><p>“<em>To Live</em> offers us an opportunity to better educate ourselves about China’s history and culture,” said Gerard Hogan, CWU professor of library services and Big Read project director. “The novel’s themes of loss, suffering, and survival are universal, leaving readers with difficult and interesting questions about individual, national, and cultural values.”</p><p>Hua’s novel articulates the realities of life in China during a time when it was very isolated from the world. Readers empathize with the novel’s characters, are moved by the struggles they endure, and come to a better understanding of life at that place and time.</p><p>Ellensburg and CWU have a strong and long connection to China. In the early 1980s, soon after the end of China’s Cultural Revolution, representatives of Anhui University, in Hefei, China, met with representatives from CWU to sign an agreement to initiate the exchange of scholars and students. This relationship with China has remained strong.</p><p>“The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to support opportunities for communities across the nation, both small and large, to take part in the NEA Big Read,” said NEA Acting Chairman Mary Anne Carter. “This program encourages people to not only discuss a book together, but be introduced to new perspectives, discuss the issues at the forefront of our own lives, and connect with one another at events.”</p><p>The NEA Big Read showcases a diverse range of contemporary titles that reflect many different voices and perspectives, aiming to inspire conversation and discovery. Each year’s reading program is designed around a single NEA Big Read selection.</p><p>CWU is one of 79 nonprofit organizations to receive an NEA Big Read grant to host a community reading program in 2018-2019.</p><p><em><img alt="Big Read Logo" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/image_gallery_images/big-read.jpg" style="width: 150px; height: 113px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 3px; float: left;">Established by Congress in 1965, the National Endowment for the Arts is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector, the NEA supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. Visit <a href="http://www.arts.gov/" target="_blank">arts.gov</a> to learn more about NEA.</em></p><p><em>Arts Midwest promotes creativity, nurtures cultural leadership, and engages people in meaningful arts experiences, bringing vitality to Midwest communities and enriching people’s lives. Based in Minneapolis, Arts Midwest connects the arts to audiences throughout the nine-state region of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. One of six non-profit regional arts organizations in the United States, Arts Midwest’s history spans more than 25 years. For more information, please visit <a href="http://www.artsmidwest.org/" target="_blank">artsmidwest.org</a>.</em></p>CWU's Main Concert Hall Named to Honor Wayne S. Hertzhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102219Mon, 03 Dec 2018 10:18:53<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/hertz%201962318%20cc.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 394px; margin: 2px;"></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Few figures in Central Washington University history have played as important a role in the school’s development as a leader in music education as the late Wayne S. Hertz, who taught at Central from 1938-1974.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">It’s why Hertz Hall was named for him when it opened in 1964 and why the university last week announced it would name the 600-seat main concert hall in the Jerilyn S. McIntyre Music Building after the long-time educator, who died in 1996.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">The honor was announced Friday night (November 30) during the Hertz Hall Holiday Concert, which celebrated not only Hertz and the 125<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the university’s music department, but also served as a farewell concert in Hertz Hall, which is scheduled to be demolished in 2019.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">“We wanted to continue to recognize Wayne Hertz’s amazing career at Central as an educator and as a leader,” noted CWU President James L. Gaudino. “It seemed appropriate that the main concert hall in the McIntyre Music Building, which hosts our main musical performances, be named in his honor.”</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Scott Peterson, who leads the CWU Men’s Choir and r</span><span style="font-size: 11.5pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">eceived the first master’s degree in Choral Conducting from Central, described Hertz </span><span style="mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">as a “giant in music education.” Peterson, who wrote, “Advent Hymn,” which will debut at the Hertz Hall Holiday Concert, said Hertz remains an inspiration to anyone who studies music at CWU.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">“He made significant contributions to Central’s music programs over the years and really put Central’s music department in the forefront of music education in the region,” Peterson said. “He is why, even today, when many students think about obtaining a music education, they immediately think of Central.”</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Hertz’s daughters, Barbara Wallgren and Sandy Young, said they were extremely pleased their father would continue to be remembered for his years of service at Central.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">“Our father thoroughly enjoyed teaching and working with so many gifted and talented students and faculty at Central during his 36 years there, we know he would be humbled and gratified by this honor,” the two noted.</span></p><p><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Hertz was born on June 7, 1908 in Bonfield, Illinois. After graduating from the University of Illinois with a BS in Music in 1932, he obtained his Masters of Music degree from Northwestern University in 1934, and Doctor of Music degree from New York University in 1959.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">He began teaching at Central Washington College of Education (as CWU was known at the time) in 1938 and soon became a prominent figure in music education throughout the Pacific Northwest. He served as chair of the music department during his entire tenure at Central.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">When he retired in 1974, he was honored by Washington Governor Daniel J. Evans with a proclamation declaring May 25, 1974 as “Wayne Hertz Day.”</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">Media contact: Richard Moreno, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-2714, Richard.Moreno@cwu.edu.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">&nbsp;</span></p><p> <style type="text/css"> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; 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mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --></style> </p></p style="text-align: center;"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="font-size: 11.5pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black"></p class="MsoNormal"></span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;color:black">Cops, Kids, and Firefighters Join Together for Kittitas County Holiday Programhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/102218Mon, 03 Dec 2018 08:19:26<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">Forty-five children from elementary schools across Kittitas County are expected to participate in the holiday program Cops, Kids, and Firefighters on Saturday December 8, at 8 a.m. in Ellensburg.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes">&nbsp; </span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">On Saturday, the children will meet at the Kittitas Valley Fire and Rescue station, 400 E. Mountain View Ave Ellensburg, WA 98926, where the Kittitas Valley Fire and Rescue firefighters will cook breakfast. After breakfast, children will be matched with a cop or firefighter as their shopping partner. They will then be escorted to Bi-Mart for their shopping spree. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">“Every year we enjoy participating in this event, it’s a great experience for the first responders as well as the kids,” said Jason Berthon-Koch, CWU’s Police Chief. “Everyone has fun getting together and celebrating the holiday season.”</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">The money raised from this event will be divided among the children equally. They will use this money to purchase gifts in Bi-Mart for themselves, friends, and family. Donations are still being accepted. Donations can be mailed or dropped at the KVFR Fire Station, 400 E. Mountain View Ave, Ellensburg, WA 98926. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">Community members and local businesses donate new bikes and helmets to this event. These bikes are raffled off to the children during breakfast. If anyone would like to donate a bike and helmet, they can be dropped off at CWU Police Department, 1211 N Wildcat Way Ellensburg, WA 98926. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><span style="font-size:12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family:Calibri">Media Contact: </span></b><span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family:Calibri">Masey Kalalau, Public Affairs, 509-963-1457, masey.peone@cwu.edu</span></p><p> <style type="text/css"> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073732485 9 0 511 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --></style> </p></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></span style="mso-spacerun:yes"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal;tab-stops:212.0pt"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family: Calibri"></p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal"></b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"></span style="font-size:12.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family:Calibri"></span style="font-size:12.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family:Calibri">Yakama Woman's Promise to Her Elders Sheds Light on Forgotten Pacific Northwest Warhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/101722Thu, 29 Nov 2018 15:10:34<p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/Emily%20Washines%20final.jpeg" style="width: 240px; height: 359px; margin: 2px; float: right;">CWU Board of Trustee member Emily Washines was 18 years old when she was crowned Miss National Congress of American Indians. Yakama tribal councilmembers and elders sung a warrior song for her and then extracted a promise.</p><p>"After I got a pageant title, [they said] we want to talk to you about who Yakama women are," Washines said. "I thought, 'Oh gosh. There is going to come cooking lessons or something.'"</p><p>But tribal leaders had something else in mind. They wanted Washines to remember a message about a little-known war that wracked the Pacific Northwest in the 1850s.&nbsp;</p><p>"They said Yakama women fought in the Yakama War," Washines, now 37, recalled. "I remarked immediately, 'I promised to carry that and to know that and to share that.'"</p><p>The impacts of that war still reverberate today. Now Washines is seeking descendants of the federal troops and militia who fought her ancestors more than a century ago. She and they hope to make a statement about healing, dialogue and remembrance by coming together.</p><p>Read the complete story on The Northwest News Network, <a href="http://www.nwnewsnetwork.org/post/yakama-woman-s-promise-her-elders-sheds-light-forgotten-pacific-northwest-war.">www.nwnewsnetwork.org/post/yakama-woman-s-promise-her-elders-sheds-light-forgotten-pacific-northwest-war.</a></p>