CWUCWU NewsCWU Newshttps://www.cwu.edu/newsen-usAvailable Financial Aid, More Class Options Boost CWU Summer Enrollmenthttps://www.cwu.edu/node/84766Fri, 17 Aug 2018 14:50:04<p><img alt="CWU students on campus" src="/sites/default/files/CWU%20students.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 267px; margin: 3px; float: right;">A higher number of students have been taking summer sessions classes this year at CWU. The reason is, in part, the renewed availability of <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/programs/fpg/index.html" target="_blank">Pell Grant</a><a href="https://www2.ed.gov/programs/fpg/index.html" target="_blank"> </a>funding.</p><p>Preliminary estimates indicate that CWU summer session enrollment was up 7 percent from this same time last summer, noted Gail Mackin, CWU associate provost for undergraduate and faculty affairs.&nbsp;</p><p>“Summer session offers students with opportunities to catch up on necessary courses, add an additional major or minor, and ensure they progress towards graduation within their projected timelines,” Mackin added. “Colleges and departments focused on increasing online sections this summer recognizing the need for flexibility with respect to students’ work schedules and location.”</p><p>This summer, CWU experienced a 20 percent increase in the number of students taking online classes compared to last summer.&nbsp;</p><p>“We focused offering more sections of high-demand general education courses [such as first-year English],” Mackin pointed out. “A combination of getting our message out to students and faculty, along with careful advising, allowed for a higher number of students to be enrolled in these typically congested courses. Those students are now able to advance to their higher level courses.”</p><p>Congress restored year-around Pell Grants last year, following curtailment of the program in 2011. The availability of grants for the summer term also contributed to the increased enrollment.</p><p>“Previously, only Pell-eligible students who were graduating during summer could receive Pell funds to complete their education,” explained Sharon O'Hare, CWU vice president for strategic enrollment management. “Now that federal aid may be used during the summer, the number of students receiving it grew to 830—more than three and a half times the total last summer.”</p><p>The funding also provided added support for students who have responsibilities, such as jobs or family circumstances, which prevent them from taking a maximum class load during the traditional school year.<br><br>“While the lifetime amount of aid a student may receive has not increased, certainly this year-round access to Pell aid can shorten a student's time to completing his or her degree,” O’Hare acknowledged.</p><p><strong>Media contact:</strong> Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p></br></br>CWU’s Air Quality Monitor Gives Real Time Updates on Smoky Conditionshttps://www.cwu.edu/node/84600Thu, 16 Aug 2018 15:38:35<p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Air%20quality%20monitor-crop.jpg" style="width: 475px; height: 481px;"></p><p>Worried about the air quality? Central Washington University’s Department of Geological Sciences hosts an air quality and weather monitor on its website, www.geology.cwu.edu/airquality/.</p><p>The monitor is a science geek’s dream—all you could ever want to know about atmospheric conditions, barometric pressure, particulate matter, and ozone concentrations—all in real time.</p><p>The monitor is located on the top of the Science II building on the CWU campus. It came about as a collaboration with the Departments of Geological Sciences and Chemistry, and a senior capstone project of the Department of Computer Science. The monitor has precision sensors that measure a number of different parameters, including the concentration of particulates in the air. A high concentration of fine particles, also referred to as PM2.5 (i.e., particulate matter with diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometer), as seen with the current dense wildfire smoke, can be dangerous upon inhalation.</p><p>“It’s really an amazing device,” said Anne Johansen, CWU chemistry professor, and advisor for the project. “The students were ingenious in developing a user-friendly web interface that could relay results in real time and also allow for viewing past data. With these sensitive instruments, we can evaluate minute changes in air quality.”</p><p>The air quality monitor link can also be found on CWU’s annual fire watch website, www.cwu.edu/fireupdate, which provides current updates on fires in central Washington.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br>CWU Recreation Center and Staff Facilitate Courageous Kids Climbinghttps://www.cwu.edu/node/84599Thu, 16 Aug 2018 10:25:03<p><iframe class="youtube-player" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qRpi8OI6NlQ?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%" height="392" frameborder="0"></iframe></p><p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/Courageus%20Kids%20Taysha%20Snyder.jpeg" style="width: 375px; margin: 3px; float: right; height: 328px;">The only program of its kind, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/CourageousKidsClimbing/" target="_blank">Courageous Kids Climbing</a> will take place just 15 times this year in Washington, California, Idaho, and Nevada. One of those sessions was held Saturday, August 11, at the <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/climbing-wall/" target="_blank">rock-climbing wall</a> in CWU’s <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/surc/university-recreation" target="_blank">Student Union and Recreation Center</a>.</p><p>Jeff Riechmann, from McCall, Idaho, founded and self-funds the program, which involves sponsoring free climbing events for children with special needs.</p><p>“We say children, but we invite anyone between the ages of 3-months and 103-years with special needs, physical or developmental, to participate in this event,” Riechmann pointed out, noting that there were seven participants of different ages and needs that participated on Saturday. “We’ve also worked with wounded warriors, even cancer survivors.”</p><p>Melissa Robertson, CWU Recreation Climbing Wall and Challenge Course coordinator, added, “By hosting events like this, we are increasing the awareness that we are all capable of so much more than we often believe.”</p><p>The goal of the event is to help participants acquire or develop skills such as hand-eye, hand-foot, and left-right coordination; focus; and problem solving.</p><p>“For some, who are confined to a wheelchair, we help to get them from a horizontal to a vertical world,” Riechmann added.</p><p>That included Taysha Snyder, 21, from Royal City, who attended the CWU event along with her 20-year-old brother Zach. Taysha, who suffers from Down Syndrome, has come to the Central session for each of the three years the university has hosted the event. This year was special for her, and her adoptive mother, Sena. Both Taysha and Zach are adopted.</p><p>“Because of my daughter’s anxiety, she wouldn’t do anything with the harness without me being right there,” Snyder said. “This year, she’s doing exactly what they’re asking her to do.”</p><p>&nbsp;</p><audio controls=""><source src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/video/Climbing wall No 1.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"> Your browser does not support the audio element.</audio><p>Not only that, but Taysha actually made it to the top of the CWU rock wall—50 feet in the air, to her obvious delight, not-to-mention that of her mother. Zach, who is autistic with additional neurological complications, also showed significant gains from previous years, particularly in terms of his confidence level, according to Sena.</p><p>That came as no surprise to Aubrey Edwards, a junior at CWU, serves with the CWU Recreation staff supervising the rock-climbing facility. This was her second year working with the Courageous Kids Climbing event.</p><p>“You can see it constantly throughout the day—the confidence definitely grows tremendously,” Edwards stated.</p><p>Even so, Edwards acknowledges that the participants can be a bit awe-struck, even intimidated, upon seeing the CWU wall site for the first time.</p><p>“This was definitely crossing new boundaries for some of them, who had never climbed before, but everyone climbed super hard today,” Edwards said. “The kids came in to test themselves and test their limits, and their parents really loved to see them climbing.”</p><p>&nbsp;</p><audio controls=""><source src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/video/Climbing Wall No 2.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"> Your browser does not support the audio element.</audio><p>Robertson noted that CWU climbing wall student staff went through specialized training required to support adaptive events, with a goal of “hosting more programs like this one throughout the year. I also hope to integrate people of various abilities into our existing programs and encourage them that climbing--and all forms of recreation--are achievable for anyone and everyone.”</p><p>Riechmann says, based on the success of the Ellensburg event and the positive feedback he has received, he plans to return to CWU for an annual Courageous Kids Climbing event next year and, “for as long as the university will have us,” he added.</p><p>Robertson is already looking forward to next year’s event.</p><p>“This is such a great opportunity for my student staff to learn how to serve people of various backgrounds and adapt to their individual needs,” she continued. “The soft and technical skills gained from engaging with participants from events like this can be transformational not only to the participants but to the staff as well.”</p><p><strong>Media contact: </strong>Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p></audio controls=""></audio controls="">Environmental interns get their feet wet this summerhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/84598Thu, 16 Aug 2018 07:54:46<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/images/CWU%20interns.jpg" style="width: 475px; height: 316px;"></p><p>Some students take their summer break from college to relax and travel, while many take the time to work a second job or an internship. For the interns at Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group, their summer is spent in waders and snorkels. . . . The program started with small numbers of students from Central Washington University.</p><p><br>Read more of this story in the <a href="https://www.dailyrecordnews.com/news/environmental-interns-get-their-feet-wet-this-summer/article_34eb4d6b-0f76-52fa-a1eb-bcd41d7145e5.html" target="_blank">Daily Record</a>.</p></br>Central Washington University Statement on Professor Matt Manwellerhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/84100Tue, 14 Aug 2018 11:06:44<p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto;margin-left:.5in;text-align:center" align="center"> <style type="text/css"> </style> <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;">Statement</span></b><br><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif; mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">August 14, 2018</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">Central Washington University has concluded its investigation of Professor Matt Manweller and has provided written notice of the termination of his faculty employment effective as of today, August 14.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">The investigation report, completed by Trish Murphy of Northwest Workplace Law, is a public record subject to disclosure under the Public Records Act. The report will be made available on or about August 27, unless by that date Dr. Manweller obtains a court order prohibiting its release. This is in accordance with the University’s practice under the Public Records Act of providing two weeks’ notice prior to disclosing records from employee personnel files. Dr. Manweller is of course free at any time to authorize the University’s release of the report.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">The University regrets that Dr. Manweller has chosen to respond to the investigation report by publicly attacking the objectivity and professional integrity of the investigator. Trish Murphy is a consummate professional who has conducted more than 200 workplace investigations and is widely respected as a seasoned investigator with high standards of objectivity, thoroughness, and fairness. The University stands by Ms. Murphy’s comprehensive investigative report and is confident that the report will withstand public scrutiny.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">Dr. Manweller has been afforded all of his due process rights under the faculty collective bargaining agreement, including the right to union representation, the right to be informed in detail of the allegations against him before any investigatory interview with him, and the right to a predisciplinary conference providing him an opportunity to respond orally and in writing to the investigative findings. Throughout this internal process Dr. Manweller has been represented by private legal counsel as well as by the faculty union. The faculty contract also affords Dr. Manweller and his union representation the right to challenge the decision under the contract’s grievance procedures.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold">The University recognizes that its inability to comment during the pending investigation has enabled Dr. Manweller to access media outlets for the purpose of shaping his own message. The University deeply regrets that Dr. Manweller has chosen to make public statements minimizing, trivializing, even ridiculing, the female students who have come forward with legitimate concerns. The University trusts that the investigation report—and the University’s response—will fully address and validate the concerns of our students, and we thank them for their courage in coming forward.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto;margin-left:.5in;text-align:center" align="center"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;">###</span></b></p><p> <style type="text/css"> <style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; 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mso-bidi-font-weight:bold"></p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold"></p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;; mso-bidi-font-weight:bold"></p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto"></span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;"></p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto;margin-left:.5in;text-align:center" align="center"></b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"></span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;">Standout CWU students awarded select study abroad scholarshipshttps://www.cwu.edu/node/84098Mon, 13 Aug 2018 16:27:40<p><img alt="(L. to r.) Mirella Dado-Fox and RaeLani Mathias, Freeman-ASIA Scholarship winners" src="/sites/default/files/Dado%20Fox%20and%20Mathias%20Japan%20scholars%202018.jpg" style="width: 450px; float: right; margin: 3px; height: 270px;">Two CWU students have been awarded highly competitive scholarships that will allow them to study in East or Southeast Asia. Mirella Dado-Fox and RaeLani Mathias both received <a href="https://www.iie.org/freeman-asia" target="_blank">Freeman-ASIA Scholarships</a>, while Mathias also was presented with a <a href="https://www.iie.org/programs/gilman-scholarship-program" target="_blank">Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship</a>.</p><p>“These scholarships receive thousands of applications each cycle, and students compete nationally for them,” said Steve Cook, assistant director for <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/study-abroad-and-exchange-programs" target="_blank">CWU Study Abroad and Exchange Programs</a>. “Both are significant awards and, aside from the financial benefits, tap students into extensive alumni networks.</p><p>“That Mirella and RaeLani were successful speaks to not only the quality of their chosen study abroad programs but also to their dedication and abilities to communicate who they are and how study abroad and—by extension—these scholarships serve their goals, both present and future,” he continued.</p><p>Dado-Fox, a junior from Centralia, is majoring in both Japanese and Asian Studies. During the upcoming fall quarter, she will study at <a href="https://www.kufs.ac.jp/en/" target="_blank">Kyoto (Japan) University of Foreign Studies</a>, which “perfectly aligns with my academic goals,” Dado Fox noted.</p><p>“Studying abroad will provide me with firsthand experience in the Japanese language and give me cultural insight that I would never be able to obtain from a textbook [alone],” she said.</p><p>Her career goal is to become a Japanese language and East Asian studies professor. After she earns her bachelor’s degree from CWU, she wants to participate in the <a href="https://jetprogramusa.org/" target="_blank">Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program</a>, which allows college graduates—mostly native English speakers—to become assistant language teachers in Japan. Dado-Fox plans to do that while completing her master’s degree coursework online.</p><p>Mathias, a senior from Walla Walla, is also a dual major in Japanese and Instructional Foundations, as well as pursuing minors in both Linguistics and Teaching English as a Second Language. All of next year, she will study at <a href="https://language.takushoku-u.ac.jp/english/" target="_blank">Takushoku University</a>, near Tokyo.</p><p>“When I was in 8th grade, I discovered Japanese animation,” she explained. “My interest focused my curiosity specifically through the beautiful sound of the language. I wanted more: I wanted to learn about the people and the culture.”</p><p>She also aspires to become involved in the JET Program and, ultimately, develop mastery in other Asian languages and cultures.</p><p>“I want to be able to speak to many people and help those who are unable to fully express themselves in a non-native language,” she noted.</p><p>The Freeman-ASIA program supports U.S. undergraduates, with demonstrated financial need, who desire to study in East or Southeast Asia. The program’s goal is to increase the number of U.S. citizens and permanent residents with first-hand exposure to Asia and understanding of its people and cultures.</p><p>After completing their program, award recipients share their experiences on their home campuses or communities to encourage study abroad by their peers. Since 2001, Freeman-ASIA has made study abroad in East and Southeast Asia possible for more than 4,600 undergraduates from more than 600 institutions nationwide.</p><p>The U.S. Department of State-funded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship is a similar grant program in that it enables students of limited financial means to study or intern abroad, to gain skills critical to United States national security and economic prosperity.</p><p>It, too, was established in 2001 and has developed a successful record of accomplishment in supporting students typically underrepresented in education abroad, such as first-generation and ethnic minority college students, those with disabilities, students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, hailing from minority-serving institutions, community colleges, or from U.S. states with lower study-abroad participation.<br><br><strong>Media contact:</strong> Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p><p><strong>Photo caption: </strong>(L. to r.) Mirella Dado-Fox and RaeLani Mathias</p></br></br>CWU Alumna Takes America's Fashion Scene by Stormhttps://www.cwu.edu/node/83932Mon, 13 Aug 2018 11:31:59<p><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/images/Joy%20Egbejimba.png" style="width: 475px; height: 262px;"></p><p>Nuciano is a Seattle, USA-based luxury handbag label that offers today’s modern woman a freedom of expression of her taste in uncompromised high quality and luxury handbags without the usual exorbitant price tags.</p><p>A brainchild of Mrs. Joy Egbejimba [a CWU accounting alumna], Nuciano which is derived from the word “Nnukachiano” resonates the freedom for the woman to Believe &amp; Express herself and her independence.</p><p>From desk-to-dinner, the select curated collection features elegant designs that come with a variety of fierce colour options; even as the Nuciano brand is fast becoming Hollywood's favourite handbag designer.</p><p>Read more of this story in the <a href="http://www.newsexpressngr.com/news/58704-Nigerian-lady-takes-Americas-fashion-scene-by-storm" target="_blank">News Express: Nigeria's Global Voice</a>.</p>CWU Alumnus Wanz to Perform in "Porgy and Bess" with Seattle Operahttps://www.cwu.edu/node/83931Mon, 13 Aug 2018 07:50:43<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/wanz-image.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 250px; margin-left: 4px; margin-right: 4px; float: left;">It was the breakout hit for Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, but the hit song “Thrift Shop” featured the unique voice of Seattle resident Michael “Wanz” Wansley.</p><p>This weekend, his vocal talents will support a completely different company of singers: the Seattle Opera.</p><p>“Wanz” is part of the company for the opera’s production of “Porgy and Bess."</p><p>Read more of this story on <a href="https://www.king5.com/article/news/local/thrift-shop-singer-wanz-to-perform-with-seattle-opera/281-582266048" target="_blank">KING-5 News</a>.</p>CWU to Participate in Statewide Student Voter Registration Challengehttps://www.cwu.edu/node/83435Fri, 10 Aug 2018 07:07:25<p><img alt="Charli Sorenson from the Kittitas Valley League of Women Voters and Leah Mobley" src="/sites/default/files/Vote%20image.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 291px; margin: 3px; float: right;">With this week’s primary election now history, the political focus turns to the November 6th general election. State officials are hoping to see a higher number of college students cast ballots during the voting this year. That was the reason for the launch of the <a href="https://www.governor.wa.gov/studentvoterchallenge">Governor’s Student Voter Registration Challenge</a>. CWU was the state’s first four-year university to officially sign on to take the challenge, which was announced this week.</p><p>“This comes at a time when civic engagement among our college students has reached an all-time low and the need for meaningful youth involvement in our state’s political process needs the collective voices of this important segment,” said Antonio Sanchez, CWU director of Intergovernmental and International Relations. “Students will give a fresh, new perspective to the needs facing the many challenges and opportunities of our dynamic times.”</p><p>Washington Governor Jay Inslee and Secretary of State Kim Wyman hosted a conference call with schools participating in the challenge. Its goal is to have as many eligible students as possible register before the general election. <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/ascwu/legislative-affairs">Leah Mobley, the Associated Students of CWU vice president of legislative affairs</a>, was among those participating on that call.&nbsp;</p><p>“I’ve always felt passionate that students need to be educated--that they need to understand what they’re voting for,” Mobley stated, adding her interest in politics began in elementary school. “They [student] need to understand that not every person across the world that is their age can cast their vote and make their voice heard in the way that we can here. It’s a right we are truly blessed to have.”</p><p>Mobley, a junior from Stevenson, Washington, will lead Central’s student body efforts to win the voter challenge. It will be judged by which schools report the highest percentage of new and updated voter registrations, and for those with the highest overall percentage of students registered to vote. The winning schools will be announced at the end of November.</p><p>During the conference call, Wyman took time to congratulate CWU for efforts it has already made to ensure more students get engaged in the political process.</p><p>Mobley points out those efforts have included adding ballot drop boxes on the Ellensburg campus. She points out that, for the last several years, Central has been actively advocating students register for and then take time to cast their ballots. She says she hopes to encourage university faculty to further support the cause during fall quarter classes.&nbsp;</p><p>Sanchez asserted that increased participation by students,--particularly those from CWU--is vital since they represent&nbsp;an important cross-section of the demographics of Washington.</p><p>“Together the CWU community brings the voices of rural and diverse communities together at a location that actively embraces our civil responsibilities and liberties,” he affirmed.</p><p><strong>Contact: </strong>Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p><p><strong>Photo caption:</strong> (L. to r.) Charli Sorenson from the Kittitas Valley League of Women Voters registering students in front of the CWU Student Union and Recreation Center (courtesy: KVLWV), Leah Mobley, at the Washington State Capitol in Olympia.</p><p>“Charli and the rest of the women from the League have done a great job with voter registration,” Mobley acknowledged. “Their partnership is greatly appreciated.”</p>CWU Creates New Health and Wellness Unithttps://www.cwu.edu/node/83433Thu, 09 Aug 2018 08:06:53<p>To ensure that the well-being of our students is paramount in everything we do, Central Washington University is taking the step of elevating campus health and wellness programs.&nbsp; This reorganization within Student Success and under the Dean of Student Success will result in a new unit consisting of the CWU Student Medical and Counseling Clinic, the Wellness Center, and the Department of Recreation that will report to an Associate Dean of Health and Wellness.&nbsp; This new position is funded from vacancies and does not require the commitment of additional resources.&nbsp; The university will conduct a national search for the new position, which is expected to be filled in the fall.</p><p>Making health and wellness a higher priority for the institution not only establishes a foundation of student excellence, but also recognizes the increasingly important role health and wellness play in our students’ lives. By reorganizing health and wellness programs into a single unit with greater visibility, CWU places new and greater emphasis on these areas and makes our health and wellness programs more accessible to our students.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Katherine Frank</p><p>Provost/Vice President for Academic and Student Life</p>