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Primate

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Primate Behavior and Ecology
Dr. April Binder, Director
(509) 963-2803
April.Binder@cwu.edu

Ms. Penelope Anderson, Secretary Senior
(509)-963-3201
Penelope.Anderson@cwu.edu
 

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Recent publications on Chimpanzee behaviors

Two new publications coming from recent graduates of the CWU Primate Behavior program. The first publication was by graduate Robin Salak and was published by the Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens. This study titled Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) Wounding Frequency Affected by the Presence Versus Absence of Visitors? A Multi-Institutional Study focuses on 21 chimpanzees housed at three U.S. based zoos. Zoo care staff were asked to respond to a 29-question survey to help determine wound frequency of the chimpanzees across a 51-day period. Surveys were completed before the COVID-19 pandemic and then after the closing of zoos during the pandemic in order to understand how chimpanzee welfare can be adversely affected by zoo visitors.  An important part of animal care is understanding how animals’ environment is negatively impacting their welfare. Studies like this can help inform institutions and help them make improvements to their enclosures. Following her graduation Robin has started working at the Riverside Discover Center in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. She is their resident Primatologist and Research Coordinator.

The programs most recent publication comes from Julia Greeson and was published in the journal Animals. An Evaluation of Ethograms Measuring Distinct Features of Enrichment Use by Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) focuses on the chimpanzees at Chimp Sanctuary Northwest (CSNW) in Cle Elum, WA. Provided with a vast video achieve, Julia scored 2054 videos consisting of 732 minutes of video footage. From these videos Julia analyzed what types of enrichment was used, how it was manipulated and in what social context it was used. From this data, it was determined that not all enrichment is appropriate for all chimpanzees and that individual needs should be considered instead of a “one size fits all” approach. Research like this can help inform institutions on how to better provide enrichment for their animals. Following her graduation Julia has started working at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. There she is assisting in research to understand Alzheimer’s.

Complete citations of the work referenced above:

Salak, R.E.; Cloutier Barbour, C. Is Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) Wounding Frequency Affected by the Presence Versus Absence of Visitors? A Multi-Institutional Study. J. Zool. Bot. Gard. 2022, 3, 316–327. https://doi.org/ 10.3390/jzbg3030025

Greeson, Julia L., Kara I. Gabriel, J. B. Mulcahy, Bonnie King Hendrickson, Susan D. Lonborg, and Jay C. Holloway. 2022. "An Evaluation of Ethograms Measuring Distinct Features of Enrichment Use by Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)" Animals 12, no. 16: 2029. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12162029

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