CWUNewsNewshttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/newsen-usMariachi club members now earn credit thanks to new CWU class https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2718Thu, 07 Nov 2019 18:20:46<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/images/1mariachi_11x.jpg" /></p> <p>Mariachi music has been steadily gaining popularity on the CWU campus ever since the Mariachi del Centro club was founded in 2014. Students who enjoy playing the traditional Mexican folk music now have another outlet to develop their skills.</p> <p>This fall, the CWU Department of Music introduced a non-conducted class, Music 217L, that allows Mariachi club members to hone their musical talents and receive credit at the same time. (Music 417L, for juniors and seniors, is offered during the same class period.)&nbsp;</p> <p>The class, led by Associate Professor Bret Smith, meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the McIntyre Music Building, providing 11 of the club&rsquo;s 12 members with an extra rehearsal opportunity every week.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s more like an hour-long musical coaching session than me teaching students how to play Mariachi,&rdquo; said Smith, a conductor and cellist who specializes in instrumental&nbsp;music education. &ldquo;They all want to become better musicians, so I try to show them how they can improve, both individually and as a group. Then they get together and rehearse on their own.&rdquo;</p> <p>Mariachi del Centro also meets for two hours every Thursday and has performed at campus events this fall, including the Latinx welcome, the Fall Open House, and Día de los Muertos. Their next performance will be December 4 at 8 p.m. in the McIntyre Music Building recital hall.</p> <p>The club is led by president Daniel Cedeno, vice president Abel Banuelos-Juarez, and treasurer Yajayra Ramirez. They are joined by eight other club members in Music 217L and Music 417L.</p> <p>&ldquo;We eventually want to win awards and become recognized around the state,&rdquo; said Cedeno, who started playing Mariachi in the fourth grade in his hometown of Wenatchee. &ldquo;But the main thing is the music.&rdquo;</p> <p>Smith said he has been helping his students learn to isolate certain sounds and highlight those melodies to create a better harmony when they play as a group. He also advises them on selecting the songs they will eventually perform.<img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/images/2mariachi_1.jpg" style="float: right; margin: 0px 0px 30px 30px; width: 600px; height: 358px;" /></p> <p>Overall, he has been impressed by his students&rsquo; commitment to excellence.</p> <p>&ldquo;They have a high vision of what they want to become,&rdquo; Smith said. &ldquo;They&rsquo;ve been practicing a lot, and it shows.&rdquo;</p> <p>Smith added that he believes CWU is an ideal location to build interest in Mariachi music and, more broadly, Mexican culture. Ellensburg and other cities in Central Washington have rich agricultural traditions, and a great deal of that history involves Latin American immigrants.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Mariachi allows arts and culture to intersect with the Latinx community,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Because of where we&rsquo;re located &mdash; with the migration and settlement traditions of this area &mdash; CWU is a natural fit for something like this.&rdquo;</p> <p>Smith and his colleagues also have been discussing long-term plans for the Music 217L and Music 417L class. Over time, the music department would like to introduce a general education course that would focus on the history, evolution, and cultural importance of Mariachi music.</p> <p>But, for now, Smith is just happy to be working with this talented group of young musicians as they work to develop a new musical tradition at CWU.</p> <p>&ldquo;We are just getting started, so we&rsquo;re still considering our options,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;The main thing we want to do is build sustainability so we always have new students coming through the program.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Media contact:&nbsp;David Leder, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1518,&nbsp;David.Leder@cwu.edu.</p> <p>Thursday, November 7, 2019</p> </p style="text-align: center;">Daisy Verduzco Reyes - Nationally known Latinx professor, author to visit CWU this monthhttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2717Thu, 17 Oct 2019 14:30:55<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/images/daisy%20verduzco%20reyes.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></p> <p>One of the most influential figures in the Latinx higher education community will be visiting Central Washington University later this month.</p> <p><br /> Daisy Verduzco Reyes, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut&rsquo;s El Instituto: Institute of Latino/a, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies, is scheduled to be in Ellensburg from October 22-25, participating in a series of workshops and panel discussions.</p> <p>Verduzco Reyes is best known for her 2018 book, &ldquo;Learning to be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics,&rdquo; in which she explores how Latinx college students&rsquo; identities and experiences are shaped by their interactions with others on campus and in their community.</p> <p>The term &ldquo;Latinx&rdquo; refers to a person of Latin American origin or descent, and is used as a gender-neutral or nonbinary alternative to Latino or Latina.</p> <p>CWU biological sciences professor Dan Beck, who is helping coordinate Verduzco Reyes&rsquo; visit, believes hosting a hands-on, community-focused event like this has the power to &ldquo;empower, encourage, and inspire&rdquo; students and others in the community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Our overall goal for bringing Dr. Reyes to CWU is to connect with our Latinx community and create more opportunities for student success,&rdquo; said Beck, the director of El Centro Latinx for Latino and Latin American Studies.</p> <p>&ldquo;Her experience and knowledge will also help our staff, faculty, and administration provide better support for Latinx students. We want to have an honest conversation, and we hope this event brings people together.&rdquo;</p> <p>Verduzco Reyes is the daughter of Mexican immigrants and is a first-generation college graduate. She grew up in California&rsquo;s San Fernando Valley and earned her undergraduate degree from the University of California-Santa Barbara and her master&rsquo;s degree and doctorate from the University of California-Irvine.</p> <p>Her research is primarily focused on how race and ethnicity are constructed and mobilized within institutions, with a specific interest on sites critical for social mobility, such as colleges and universities.</p> <p>&ldquo;This is a unique opportunity for us to engage with our students, and we think it&rsquo;s going to be very powerful,&rdquo; said Abby Chien, director of the CWU Diversity and Equity Center (DEC).</p> <p>Verduzco Reyes&rsquo; first scheduled event is an informal, students-only presentation at the DEC in Black Hall from noon-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 23. Later that day, she will give a public presentation in Samuelson Hall, room 104, from 5:30-7 p.m.&nbsp;</p> <p>All of Verduzco Reyes&rsquo; public appearances are open to anyone who would like to attend. No invitation or RSVP is required.</p> <p>Two students-only workshops are scheduled for Thursday, October 24, at the DEC &mdash; one at 10 a.m., the other at 1:30 p.m. &mdash; followed by a panel discussion on Latinx issues from 3-4:30 p.m. in the Brooks Library commons. The panel will feature CWU students, faculty, staff, and administrators.</p> <p>Verduzco Reyes will sign books from 4:30-5 p.m. at the library and then participate in the Thursday Thinks gathering at the Iron Horse Brewpub from 7-8 p.m. The third day of her visit will feature a drop-in question-and-answer session for faculty, staff, and students from 8:30-10:30 a.m. in the DEC.</p> <p>&ldquo;Among the things we&rsquo;re hoping to learn from Dr. Reyes are how we can best support and empower our Latinx students,&rdquo; Beck said. &ldquo;We also want to celebrate Latinx culture and identity, and learn to embrace diversity within our Latinx community.&rdquo;</p> <p>Other goals for the three-day forum are:</p> <p>&bull; Learn ways to support Latinx students. This not only supports our Latinx community, but also assists in supporting additional underrepresented students on campus from multiple racial and ethnic backgrounds.</p> <p>&bull; Build more bridges and richer connections between Latinx and non-Latinx students, staff, and community members.</p> <p>&bull; Help everyone at CWU to better appreciate the strength of the Latinx community and the challenges they face.</p> <p>Learn more about Verduzco Reyes and her work at&nbsp;<a href="http://daisyverduzcoreyes.com">daisyverduzcoreyes.com</a>.</p> <p>Media contact: David Leder, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1518,&nbsp;David.Leder@cwu.edu.</p> First-generation CWU Student Publishes Poetry in Multiple Publicationshttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2716Mon, 16 Sep 2019 09:58:31<p><img alt="" src="http://www.cwu.edu/sites/default/files/pictures/Ruby%20Nambo%20Student%20Author.jpg" style="float: right; width: 400px; height: 267px; border-width: 10px; border-style: solid;" />When Ruby Nambo was in first grade, her teacher expressed concerns about her reading and writing ability. Nambo, who was born in Sultan, grew up in a household where only Spanish was spoken.</p> <p>To help improve Nambo&rsquo;s handwriting and English skills, the teacher suggested she try to write short stories.</p> <p>Nambo, now a senior at Central Washington University, says it was a life-changing moment. From then on, she wrote short stories on a variety of topics, then began penning poetry after being introduced to the form in the eighth grade.</p> <p>One of her earliest poems was written as a final assignment for the poetry unit in an English class. Each student had to stand in front of the class and present three poems. When it was time for Nambo to read, she set up a large tri-fold poster that showcased several of her poems.</p> <p>&ldquo;I wanted to take it above and beyond,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>In the center of the poster was a photo of Nambo&rsquo;s brother and surrounding the photo were words from a poem she wrote about her brother, who lives with a disability.</p> <p>&ldquo;You know, Ruby, I feel so sorry for you about your brother,&rdquo; a classmate had told Nambo just before she presented her final poem, which was about her brother.</p> <p>In that moment, Nambo had to decide if she would read the poem or not.</p> <p>She convinced herself to press ahead because, in her heart, she felt there was a reason to. She said from that moment on, she&rsquo;s prideful about her writing.</p> <p>Life at CWU</p> <p>Nambo is a first-generation college student who began her journey at CWU in fall 2015.</p> <p>&ldquo;In Sultan there (weren&rsquo;t) many people of color like myself,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;So, when I came here there was a lot more diversity.&rdquo;</p> <p>The&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cwu.edu/diversity/diversity-equity-center"><strong>Diversity and Equity Center&nbsp;</strong></a>(DEC),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cwu.edu/leadership-engage/"><strong>Center for Leadership and Community Engagement&nbsp;</strong></a>(CLCE),&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.cwu.edu/academic-achievement/trio-student-support-services">TRiO</a></strong>&nbsp;and the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cwu.edu/academic-achievement"><strong>SSS </strong></a>program&nbsp;helped Nambo succeed along the way.</p> <p>&ldquo;They&rsquo;ve helped me out with pushing me to do better not only in classes but also to fulfill my dreams,&rdquo; Nambo said.</p> <p>Nambo progressed in her time at CWU with a support system by her side.</p> <p>&ldquo;I realized all these great support systems I have led me to become the person I am today,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;(CWU) did a great service in me to do better and to take that step of opportunity no matter where I&rsquo;m at.&rdquo;</p> <p>Creating connections</p> <p>Verónica Gómez-Vilchis, assistant director for the DEC met Nambo when she was a first-year student. At the time, Gómez-Vilchis was the adviser for Movimiento Estudiantil Chinana/o de Aztlan (MEChA).</p> <p>&ldquo;She was very quiet, very to herself, just watching,&rdquo; Gómez-Vilchis said.</p> <p>Nambo began to grow at CWU when she gained the courage to share her poems out loud, about two years after meeting Gómez-Vilchis.</p> <p>Gómez-Vilchis spoke about a time when she saw a video of Nambo reading poems at a retreat. In the video, students were cheering on Nambo the entire time, full of excitement.</p> <p>&ldquo;I love that the students were so welcoming of her and were excited and supportive of her,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>After the video, Gómez-Vilchis saw Nambo&rsquo;s confidence bloom.</p> <p>&ldquo;Research shows when students feel like they belong, they stay longer,&rdquo; Gómez-Vilchis said. &ldquo;It was really important for her, as a minority, to find some people that look like her or had similar experiences as her.&rdquo;</p> <p>The latest edition</p> <p>Nambo&rsquo;s poetry will be published in the fall 2019 edition of the &ldquo;New Directions for Student Leadership&rdquo; journal, co-edited by Ratnesh Nagda and Larry Roper. The focus of the upcoming volume is &ldquo;Centering dialogue in leadership development.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;(Nambo) writes powerfully about leadership that emerges from communities, through community building, and for community betterment,&rdquo; said Nagda, who is an independent educational consultant and former professor. &ldquo;She conveys passionately the importance, urgency and resiliency of change-making today for a better tomorrow.&rdquo;</p> <p>Nambo and Nagda first met at a student leadership and changemaking retreat at CWU in January 2019.</p> <p>Throughout the retreat, &ldquo;(Nambo) was very thoughtful, insightful and creative as a participant,&rdquo; Nagda said.</p> <p>After participants parted ways, Nambo shared with Nagda several poems she wrote about her experiences during the retreat. He then shared Nambo&rsquo;s poems with the co-editor of the journal.</p> <p>&ldquo;As co-editors, we felt that it was only right that we include (Nambo&rsquo;s) poem in the journal that was about student leadership development,&rdquo; Nagda said. &ldquo;(Nambo&rsquo;s) voice as a student was crucial in having educators understand the newer ways that college students, especially first-generation students of color, are engaging in leadership and change-making.&rdquo;</p> <p>In addition to the journal, Nambo&rsquo;s work has also appeared in the Manastash Literary Journal, Z Publishing&rsquo;s Washington&rsquo;s Best Emerging Poets, Z Publishing&rsquo;s America&rsquo;s Pacific Regions Best Emerging Poets, Adelaide Literary Magazine, and Wolff Poetry Literary Journal.</p> <p>Future goals</p> <p>Now that she has had time to develop her passion, Nambo has decided to become a middle school English teacher in Washington state. She believes young adults like herself have the ability to make change in the world.</p> <p>&ldquo;As a future English teacher, I want to make that change for my future students,&rdquo; Nambo said. &ldquo;I want them to succeed and I want them to feel passionate and feel great and feel inspired just like I was.&rdquo;</p> <p>This year, while student teaching, Nambo hopes to begin inspiring students.</p> <p>In fact, &ldquo;inspirational&rdquo; and &ldquo;servant leader&rdquo; are words Gómez-Vilchis used to describe Nambo.</p> <p>&ldquo;She can be herself (at CWU) and develop and grow and reach whatever goals she has,&rdquo; Gómez-Vilchis said. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s a major part of why she&rsquo;s still here and is deciding to become a teacher.&rdquo;</p> <p>Gómez-Vilchis said Nambo&rsquo;s evolution will be a very important piece when working with students.</p> <p>&ldquo;I can only imagine how she can inspire other students who may be very quiet like she was and give them a voice through written word,&rdquo; Gómez-Vilchis said. &ldquo;She just has a way with words on paper.&rdquo;</p> <p>Gómez-Vilchis said Nambo directs people to resources they may not know are available on campus such as the CLCE and DEC. This is how Gómez-Vilchis knows Nambo is a leader.</p> <p>&ldquo;She enjoys helping others and uplifting others and is always connecting people,&rdquo; Gómez-Vilchis said.</p> <p>Besides being a teacher, Nambo hopes to one day publish her entire poetry collection. In this publication, her plan includes describing the origin and meaning of each piece.</p> <p>While poetry started as a hobby, it has become much more for Nambo.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve turned a hobby into a passion of mine,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;That passion lead me into opening doors to grow as a person.&rdquo;</p> <p>Writtten by Mariah Valles, Central Washington University Public Affairs intern and&nbsp;published in the Daily Record.</p> <p>Wednesday, September 11, 2019</p> Meet Miriam Bocchetti, Wildcat Way “Best of the Best” Recipient, 2019https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2715Thu, 06 Jun 2019 13:40:06<p>The Wildcat Way was launched in the fall of 2016 as a way to build university-wide commitment to service excellence. Little did we realize the breadth of care, talent, and devotion we would find among our own employees! Miriam Bocchetti is one such employee.</p><p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/images/Miriam_cropped.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 323px; float: right;">Miriam Bocchetti, M.A., has been the Director of the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) for 11 years, serving students from migrant and seasonal farm working backgrounds at CWU and at Yakima Valley Community College. Characterized by Leah Shelton in the fall of 2018, “Miriam is a devoted advocate for students, and her programs are nationally recognized and ranked for their high retention rates and outstanding support for students.” As secretary of the National HEP/CAMP Association Board, Miriam represents CWU in Washington, DC, and beyond. “She is one of the unsung heroes of CWU, working diligently with and for students from diverse backgrounds to provide wraparound support and opportunities for success.”</p><p>Miriam “exemplifies all the traits and ‘Ways of Being’ as a Wildcat Employee,” stated another colleague, Stacy Soderstrom. She epitomizes responsiveness and is “one of those people that you can call, message, or email and she will respond immediately. She is quick to help on committees, attend functions, or speak at engagements or any other need around campus.”</p><p>Miriam’s welcoming and inclusive nature, knowledge of the needs of the students she serves, and pride in all that she does shine through every day. It is clear that Miriam “deeply cares for her students and helping fellow CWU employees across departments as we serve all of our students here at CWU. Miriam's dedication to CAMP, students and fellow staff and faculty makes her an excellent role model at CWU.”</p><p>In addition to being a CWU alumna, Miriam is currently working toward her Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership at Colorado State University in a very competitive program. Her research will focus on migrant student persistence, and her scholarly contributions are already putting CWU on the map. “Miriam should be recognized for making CWU a stronger, safer, and more inclusive campus. She truly embodies the Wildcat Way.”</p>Historic Latino student wave reshapes many colleges. But access is uneven. - The Washington Posthttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2711Tue, 18 Dec 2018 14:29:09<p>Historic Latino student wave reshapes many colleges. But access is uneven.</p><p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG></o:AllowPNG> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves></w:TrackMoves> <w:TrackFormatting></w:TrackFormatting> <w:PunctuationKerning></w:PunctuationKerning> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas></w:ValidateAgainstSchemas> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF></w:DoNotPromoteQF> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables></w:BreakWrappedTables> <w:SnapToGridInCell></w:SnapToGridInCell> <w:WrapTextWithPunct></w:WrapTextWithPunct> <w:UseAsianBreakRules></w:UseAsianBreakRules> <w:DontGrowAutofit></w:DontGrowAutofit> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark></w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark> <w:EnableOpenTypeKerning></w:EnableOpenTypeKerning> <w:DontFlipMirrorIndents></w:DontFlipMirrorIndents> <w:OverrideTableStyleHps></w:OverrideTableStyleHps> </w:Compatibility> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"></m:mathFont> <m:brkBin m:val="before"></m:brkBin> <m:brkBinSub m:val="&#45;-"></m:brkBinSub> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"></m:smallFrac> <m:dispDef></m:dispDef> <m:lMargin m:val="0"></m:lMargin> <m:rMargin m:val="0"></m:rMargin> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"></m:defJc> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"></m:wrapIndent> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"></m:intLim> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"></m:naryLim> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="false" DefSemiHidden="false" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="371"> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 1"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 2"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 3"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 4"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 5"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 6"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 7"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 8"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 9"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 1"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 2"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 3"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 4"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 5"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 6"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 7"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 8"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 9"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal Indent"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote text"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation text"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="header"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footer"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index heading"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="caption"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of figures"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope address"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope return"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote reference"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation reference"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="line number"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="page number"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote reference"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote text"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of authorities"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="macro"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toa heading"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 2"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 3"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 4"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 5"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 2"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 3"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 4"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 5"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 2"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 3"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 4"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 5"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" QFormat="true" Name="Title"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Closing"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Signature"></w:LsdException> <w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Default Paragraph Font"></w:LsdException> </!--[if gte mso 9]></![endif]--></!--[if gte mso 9]></m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"></m:brkBin m:val="before"></m:brkBinSub m:val="&#45;-"></m:smallFrac m:val="off"></m:lMargin m:val="0"></m:rMargin m:val="0"></m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"></m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"></m:intLim m:val="subSup"></m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"></![endif]--></!--[if gte mso 9]></w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="false" DefSemiHidden="false" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="371"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 2"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 3"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 4"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 5"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 6"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 7"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 8"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="heading 9"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 1"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 2"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 3"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 4"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 5"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 6"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 7"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 8"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index 9"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 1"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 2"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 3"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 4"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 5"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 6"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 7"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 8"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="39" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toc 9"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Normal Indent"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote text"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation text"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="header"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footer"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="index heading"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="35" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" QFormat="true" Name="caption"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of figures"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope address"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="envelope return"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="footnote reference"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="annotation reference"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="line number"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="page number"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote reference"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="endnote text"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="table of authorities"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="macro"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="toa heading"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 2"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 3"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 4"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List 5"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 2"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 3"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 4"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Bullet 5"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 2"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 3"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 4"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="List Number 5"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" QFormat="true" Name="Title"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Closing"></w:LsdException Locked="false" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Signature"></w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="true" UnhideWhenUsed="true" Name="Default Paragraph Font">The World Without Walls showcases Mexican history, tradition and pride at CWUhttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2710Tue, 09 Oct 2018 08:56:40<p><img alt="" src="/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/World_Without_Walls_poster.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 309px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;">An afternoon of dance and music inspired by the traditions and regions of Mexico, called “The World Without Walls,” will begin at 1 p.m. on October 13 in McConnell Hall on the Central Washington University campus.</p><p>Admission to the event is free, with a suggested non-perishable food donation to support the A.P.O.Y.O food bank.</p><p>Showcasing more than 100 trained performers, the event will highlight regions within Mexico. The five focus areas of the country’s traditional dances will be the historical Con Cheros, Guerrero, Veracruz, Nayarit, and Jalisco.</p><p>Jose Iniguez, a CWU alumnus and winner of the prestigious 2016 Univision Latin Music Director’s Choice Award, will emcee the event. It includes performances from Bailadores de Bronce of Seattle, CWU Mariachi Del Centro, and Ballet Folklorico Los Bailadores Del Sol of Central Washington.</p><p>CWU student Randy Robert Lopez is the producer of this year’s show. He is a dancer, choreographer, producer and owner of The Ballet Folklorico De Estados Unidos, and Los Bailadores Del Sol Yakima. He has learned from indigenous elders to preserve the roots of traditional dances, and is proud to bring Mexican culture to CWU.</p><p>“I want everyone to know that with folklorico we are all connected,” he said. “This is what this university needs.”</p><p>He added that by the end of the show, “Everyone is going to know that Central Washington University is truly doing something spectacular and true to tradition.”</p><p>This event is sponsored by Africana &amp; Black Studies, MECHA, CWU Mariachi Del Centro, Bailadores de Bronce of Seattle, Ballet Folklorico Los Bailadores Del Sol of Central Washington, Jose Iniguez, CWU Student Involvement and the CWU Center for Leadership and Community Engagement. World Without Walls is one of many CWU Homecoming events. For a list of Homecoming events go to cwu.edu/homecoming. A.P.O.Y.O is a non-profit Ellensburg food and clothing bank. Parking is free to the public on weekends. For accommodations, email <a href="mailto:DS@cwu.edu">DS@cwu.edu</a>.</p><p>Media contact: Randy Robert Lopez, <a href="mailto:Robert.lope@cwu.edu">Robert.lope@cwu.edu</a>.</p></a href="mailto:DS@cwu.edu"></a href="mailto:Robert.lope@cwu.edu">Take a Walk on the Wild Side with SOBRE MÉXICO! Deadline October 31https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2709Tue, 09 Oct 2018 08:55:07<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/Sobre%20mexico-turtle.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px; float: right; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;">A rare, tropical dry forest, unique animal species, and the opportunity for international scientific collaboration—it's all there and more for students in the SOBRE Mexico program. The summer study program offers a once-in-a-lifetime chance for students to pursue a rewarding study abroad program at a renowned research station in Jalisco, México.</p><p>In 2016, Professors Daniel Beck and Gabrielle Stryker, from Central Washington University’s Department of Biological Sciences, received $249,499 from the National Science Foundation for SOBRE MÉXICO: Student Opportunities for Biological Research in México. The summer of 2017 was the first year of the grant; Beck and Stryker are now recruiting students for summer 2019. The deadline to apply is October 31, 2018.</p><p>"This year, we had an opportunity to study what the long-term effects of a natural disaster has on a unique biome," Beck said. "In October 2015, Hurricane Patricia blasted through the region, causing significant changes throughout the forest."</p><p>According to Beck, the event opened up even more exciting avenues of research.</p><p>"This past summer the SOBRE Mexico team looked at how the landscape, and the creatures that inhabit the forest, have adapted to Hurricane Patricia," he explained. "A significant loss of canopy cover and an increase in woody debris in the forest understory has altered structural and thermal microhabitats. Many species, including turtles, lizards, woodpeckers, ants, ticks, and toads, have changed the way they use habitat in the forest.</p><p>“We are learning how tropical dry forests respond to the severe disturbance of a major hurricane, which are predicted to become more frequent in the region as ocean temperatures increase. Research at CWU is helping us understand some of the effects of a warming planet earth on tropical dry forests of Mexico."</p><p>The students received research credits to analyze their data and prepare posters, and will present their work at various symposia.</p><p>"The opportunities for conducting meaningful, and ongoing research at the research station are endless," Beck noted. "This is an unparalleled opportunity for our students to expand both their personal and professional horizons."</p><p>SOBRE MÉXICO<br>The grant allows CWU students to research and study rare species in a unique environment, while collaborating with an international team of scientists. The students will live at the Estación de Biología, Chamela, a research station located in a seasonally dry tropical forest biome in coastal Jalisco, México, located south of Puerto Vallarta.</p><p>“Our students, both undergraduate and graduate, will receive a stipend to spend a summer working in one of the most amazing places in the world,” said Beck. He and his students have been making research trips to the area since 1999. “The dry tropical forest biome features extreme seasonality in rainfall, and the species that thrive there have learned to adapt to a wide range of environments.”</p><p>One of the major goals of the grant is to attract Hispanic students to biological research.</p><p>“Many of our students have grown up in bilingual families,” Beck remarked. “This program lets them use their valuable language skills to pursue science, and help non-Spanish-speaking peers in their studies. In this way, their language skills become a gateway, not a barrier.”</p><p>The program is structured to enhance cultural awareness and sensitivity for all participants. Although students don’t have to know Spanish to enter the program, they will learn and practice Spanish daily with their Spanish-speaking peers. They will also learn to present their findings to local schoolchildren, and they will travel to México City to visit UNAM, and partake in other cultural activities.</p><p>For more information or to apply to the program, go to <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/sobre-mexico" target="_blank">www.cwu.edu/sobre-mexico</a>.</p><p>Photo: Students study turtles, in this case a Mexican Spotted Wood Turtle, Rhinoclemmys rubida, among other species, in SOBRE MÉXICO.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, <a href="mailto:valeriec@cwu.edu">valeriec@cwu.edu</a></p></br></a href="mailto:valeriec@cwu.edu">CLLAS Foundationhttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2705Wed, 23 May 2018 09:35:54<p><img alt="" src="/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/CLLAS%20tablecloth.jpg"></p><p>For the Center for Latino and Latin American Studies, an interdisciplinary academic program: Supports our outstanding students at CWU, highlights student success, supports community-based research and study abroad.​</p><p><a href="http://engage.cwu.edu/pages/home-1" onclick="window.open(this.href, 'CLLASFoundation', 'resizable=no,status=no,location=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,fullscreen=no,scrollbars=no,dependent=no'); return false;">http://engage.cwu.edu/pages/home-1<br>(</a>Click the link above to donate to CLLAS. On the CWU Foundation site, click the Give button. Select CLLAS Foundation from the fund list)</p></br>Summer 2018 LLAS Course Offeringshttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2704Wed, 02 May 2018 14:43:05<p><strong>LLAS 388 - Mexican Cultural Studies - Online<br>Prof. Jason Dormady&nbsp;</strong></p><p>Contemporary and historical study of visual, performaed, culinary, and religious culture</p><p><img alt="" src="/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/POSTER%20PDF_LLAS%20388.png" width="328" height="217"></p><p><strong>LLAS 102 - Into to Latino Latin American Study - Online&nbsp;</strong><br><strong>Prof. Stella Moreno</strong></p><p>A multi-disciplinary introduction of Latino and Latin American Studies, presented in three main components: "People and the Land", "The Environment and the Human Condition", and "Socio-Political Spectrum".&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" src="/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/LLAS%20102%281%29.png" width="295" height="379"></p><p><strong>POSC 343 - The Politics of the US Mexico Border - Online</strong><br><strong>Prof. Gilberto Garcia&nbsp;</strong></p><p>The course examines the politics of the United States and Mexico border region focusing on the important role of the state in the development of policies affecting one of the longest border regions in the world. Topics covered in the course include the politics of border regions and the national state, and the diverse policy concerns of the region from economic development and immigration, to ecological degradation and health concerns.&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" src="/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/POSC%20343.png" width="293" height="378"></p></br></br></br>Immigration Panelhttps://www.cwu.edu/latino-latin-american/node/2702Wed, 25 Apr 2018 13:21:37<p>May 3, the CLLAS will be hosting a panel on immigration with speakers Dr. Phil Garrison, Dr. Gilberto Garcia, and Dr. Martin Meraz Garcia. The panel will discuss the lives of immigrants and the personal, social and political issues they face.</p><p>The panel begins at 2 in SURC 137A.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Flyer for Panel on Immigration" src="/latino-latin-american/sites/cts.cwu.edu.latino-latin-american/files/Immigration%20Panel%20Flyer.png" style="width: 424px; height: 600px; border-width: 2px; border-style: solid;"></p></p style="text-align: center;">