Top

Apply to DHC

Support DHC Students

 

 

William O. Douglas
Honors College

Hebeler Hall 219
(509) 963-1900
dhc@cwu.edu

Looking to teach with us?

In order to propose a course to the Douglas Honors College we require the following information:

  • Topic title and catalog description
  • Methods for meeting learning outcomes
  • Modes and materials for teaching
  • Evidence of currency in course content
  • Ability to teach in summer quarter

Resources for development can also be found on this page. Before beginning plans, please note that the DHC does not have an immediate need for topics under the DHC 140 / DHC 141 courses. Topic proposals for all other themes are highly encouraged.

Download Course Proposal FormSubmit Course Proposal Components

 

Syllabus Components

When creating syllabi for honors courses, please include the following:

  • Class title, time and place
  • Instructor contact and office hours
  • Course description
  • Course learning outcomes
  • Course materials
  • Assignments grading standards
  • Cours policy and expectations
  • Statement of ADA compliance
  • Statement of diversity and equal opportunity
  • Exceptions for religous holidays
  • Course schedule

This information will best inform students of expectations and resources.

This Info To Go : Syllabus Outline

 

Learning Outcomes

  • DHC 140, Humanistic Understanding

    This is a 5-credit, variable-topic course in the humanities. Focuses include analysis and interpretation of human stories of the past, present and future in order to understand the processes of continuity and change in individuals and cultures through both documented and imaginative accounts. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • analyze forms of literary, philosophical, historical or religious works from a variety of cultures.
    • articulate ways in which beliefs and values including linguistic, religious, philosophical, and historical circumstances affect interpretations of human experiences and events.
    • reason about causes and effects within historical contexts and across historical periods.
    • investigate novel problems that necessitate identification of their own linguistic, conceptual and normative presuppositions. 5. demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 150, Aesthetic Experience

    This is a 5-credit, variable-topic course which explores questions about the nature of art. This course seeks to understand, interrogate, and engage in the creative process; and to explore the connections between art, culture, and history. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • participate in imaginative and artistic creation using discipline-appropriate processes.
    • engage in discourse with aesthetic experiences and expressions within the historical, artistic, and cultural traditions of the work under consideration.
    • apply aesthetic judgment and exhibit critical thinking to explain how works of art are appreciated and evaluated from different perspectives.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 180,¬†Physical/Biological Systems I

    This is a 4-credit, variable-topic course which engages with physical and life systems, provides methods for rigorously describing the natural world, or addresses social, economic, technological, ethical or other implications of natural phenomena. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • articulate how scientific methods and forms of inquiry can be used to describe phenomena and create evidence-based explanations of the natural world.
    • recognize social, political, and ethical implications of scientific and/or mathematical discoveries and technological advancements.
    • describe how scientific, technological, and/or mathematical developments contribute to our lives and create value.
    • demonstrate strong analytical skills including quantitative reasoning and experimental techniques.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 280, Physical/Biological Systems II

    This is a 4-credit, variable-topic course which builds on the purposes of DHC 180. Studying physical and life systems provides students with methods for rigorously describing the natural world, or for addressing social, economic, technological, ethical or other implications of natural phenomena. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • apply scientific methods and forms of inquiry to describe phenomena and create evidence-based explanations of the natural world.
    • synthesize knowledge of basic scientific disciplines to examine large and complex physical and life systems and relate knowledge gained from natural sciences to other disciplines.
    • employ knowledge of scientific disciplines to make informed decisions and address issues of human concern.
    • demonstrate strong analytical skills including quantitative reasoning and experimental techniques.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 250, Social and Behavioral Dynamics

    This is a 4-credit, variable topic course which focuses on how individuals, cultures, and societies operate and evolve. Also, disciplined ways of thinking about individuals and groups are introduced. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • identify basic principles and institutions that underlie the cultures and traditions of groups, organizations, societies, and/or nations and apply these principles of human behavior for understanding self and others.
    • analyze the implications of participation in social groups and institutions to consider ways they inform ethical interactions and contribute to social inequalities.
    • describe and interpret theories about individuals, social interactions and networks, or the relationships between individuals and society while applying critical thinking to specific situations involving personal and community decision-making.
    • explain and apply diverse empirical methods, including quantitative and experimental techniques, to investigate and analyze individuals, groups, or societies.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 260, Cultural Studies I

    This is a 4-credit, variable-topic course on negotiating cultural differences by applying appropriate patterns of understanding and behavior in culturally diverse settings. Content centers one or more non-dominant cultures or peoples of the United States. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • articulate the requirements of informed citizenship based on analyses of social, cultural, economic and/or political processes, issues, and/or events.
    • analyze the ways in which social, psychological, and/or culturally diverse experiences create value in a community and influence the community.
    • analyze the reciprocal effects of governmental systems (local, national, regional, and/or global) and cultural notions of community and citizenship.
    • investigate the relationship of historical, social, economic, and/or cultural developments upon communities, citizenship, politics, and/or government.
    • critically evaluate evidence of institutionalized cultural assumptions and their effect on individuals and groups.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 261, Cultural Studies II

    This is a 4-credit, variable-topic course on negotiating cultural differences by applying appropriate patterns of understanding and behavior in culturally diverse settings. Content centers on comparative cultures across national and continental boundaries. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • analyze and evaluate the impact of global interactions upon individuals, groups, communities, and nations.
    • identify and describe global problems using interdisciplinary perspectives and conceptual models.
    • critically evaluate evidence of institutionalized cultural assumptions and inequalities as they affect nations and their peoples.
    • apply concepts and processes required for ethical decision making and efficacious civic engagement to address economic, social, and global/transnational concerns.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 270, Integrated Learning

    This is a 4-credit, variable-topic course which takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining social, economic, technological, ethical, cultural or aesthetic implications of knowledge. In addition to department courses that embrace multiple disciplines, course opportunities include community learning, service learning, and international studies courses. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • articulate an understanding of the interconnectedness of modes of inquiry across disciplines.
    • identify and explore connections between or among different disciplines to explain or inquire about phenomena
    • identify problems that require multidisciplinary approaches and  critique current mitigation strategies or solutions.
    • demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills (presentations and discussions) both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.
  • DHC 380, History of Science

    This is a 4-credit, variable-topic course introducing major themes in the history of science. This course highlights investigation of historical and scientific methods through the study of particular historical cases. Learning outcomes dictate that students will:

    • describe the historical development of the scientific process.
    • recognize the essential elements of a scientific investigation.
    • apply the methods of scientific inquiry to issues of contemporary relevance.

Problem-Based Learning

We here at the DHC highly recommend a problem-based learning approach. Research has shown that people learn more effectively when they can discuss the study material with others. Problem-Based Learning is therefore based on tutorial groups, in which groups of students work together on a specific problem.

In some settings, the study material and related tasks are included in what is referred to as a ‘block book’. The tasks form the core of this book, which also includes the course schedule, the literature list, an explanation of how your work is evaluated, etc. The block book is basically a ‘screenplay’ intended to help you navigate all the necessary learning activities. In our class, we will use the syllabus, the course books and days of guided discussion as our “block book”.

A task is also called a problem or case. The aim is for you to solve the task. Each task deals with a specific subject related to a particular theme. After working on all the tasks, you will have dealt with all the subject matter related to the theme in question.

To deal with the task in a structured fashion, you use the ‘seven-step’ method. 

  1. Clarifying difficult terms 
  2. Defining the problem
  3. Brainstorming
  4. Taking stock of and analysing the possible solutions provided in step 3
  5. Formulating learning objectives
  6. Literature study / self-study
  7. Post discussion

Please consider implementing these steps into explorations throughout honors courses.

This Info To Go : Problem-Based Learning

Media Box Image

Sapere Aude