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Anthropology and Museum Studies

2017 Barlow Award Recipients

Elizabeth in the field
Elizabeth Cook
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: OPR Coastal Primate Sanctuary Internship

I was an Intern at OPR Coastal Primate Sanctuary in Longview, WA.  I assisted the founders/caregivers with cleaning, feeding, and enrichment. I also assisted with picking up two new macaques that were retired to OPR and getting them settled in their new home.  With these two additions OPR currently houses 17 primates (mostly macaques). This was a fantastic experience and I learned a lot about captive macaque behavior and caring for primates in a sanctuary setting.  The Barlow award covered tuition and transport allowing me to focus on learning.
 

Kailie in the field
Kailie Dombrausky
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Visiting Intern Program at Fauna Foundation; Quebec, Canada

This summer I traveled to Canada where I spent ten weeks interning at a chimpanzee sanctuary. I gained valuable hands-on experience as a chimpanzee caregiver, including cleaning and preparing meals and enrichment. I also learned about chimpanzee behavior and collected data for a research project on enrichment use. The Barlow Award covered a portion of the costs which allowed for this amazing opportunity.
 

Jake in the field
Jake Funkhouser
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Re-Evaluating Captive Chimpanzee “Dominance": Chimpanzee-Caregiver Relationships and Dominance Hierarchy Analyses at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest

This study investigated an aging population of seven chimpanzees who were retired from biomedical research. This group of chimpanzees is especially interesting because of their unique group composition, varying life histories, and important connections with human caregivers. Specifically, this project looked at the social relationships within the chimpanzee and chimpanzee-caregiver societies to aid in sanctuary policy, husbandry, and expansion, as well as investigate the theoretical underpinnings and statistical representations of dominance relationships in this unique group of chimpanzees. Receiving the 2017 Pete & Sandra Barlow Award has been instrumental in carrying out my master’s thesis research at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest. Because of this support, I've been able to focus on collecting this data without financial strain. This project, along with other projects supported by the Barlow Award (2015/2016), has enabled my continued investigation of captive primate welfare while challenging and developing my research ability; doing so will make me a more competitive applicant for PhD programs and ensure I'm able to perpetuate the understanding of dynamic primate systems (social, structural, welfare, and otherwise). Thank you to Pete & Sandra Barlow for their continued support of my education and research!
 

Josefine in the field
Josefine Holms
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Single- and Pair-Housed Chacma Baboons’ (Papio ursinus) Response to Caregivers’ Use of Species-Specific Behaviors

This project was conducted at the Centre for Animal Rehabilitation and Education also known as C.A.R.E. in the Limpopo province in South Africa. The Pete and Sandra Barlow award helped ensure that Josefine could pay for the equipment used during her research, and provided some of the funds used towards lodging during her stay, and therefore was a vital component of her research. Josefine spend eight weeks observing four captive chacma baboons and their interactions with caretakers at the site. She is trying to determine if these interactions can be altered and adjusted to ensure the highest possible welfare for captive chacma baboons.
 

Darian in the field
Darian Johnson
Undergraduate Student, Anthropology; Law and Justice

Project title: Archaeological field work in coastal Ecuador

This field school was a wonderful opportunity to go out into the real world and learn new techniques that are difficult to practice in a classroom setting. We worked in groups to learn how to identify, document, map, and excavate an actual archaeological site. Along the way, we also ran into several obstacles that we needed to overcome such as language barriers, cultural differences, and very large spiders. But over the 6 weeks we learned how to adapt to these new challenges to complete our work more effectively. All in all, it was an incredible learning experience. Unfortunately, flying to another country for a field school is quite expensive. I wasn’t sure that I would have enough money to go on this trip, but thanks to the Pete and Sandra Barlow award I was able to comfortably afford the chance to participate in this fantastic field school.
 

Samantha in the field
Samantha Jones
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Interspecies comparisons of captive gibbons’ (Hylobatidae) intra-pair behaviors indicative of the pair bond

This research took place at The Gibbon Conservation Center in Santa Clarita, California. I focused on the interactions between mated adult pairs. This is important research to help conservation efforts in programs that want to release gibbons back into the wild. The Pete and Sandra Barlow award aided in these conservation efforts by making this research possible. It covered research fees and housing at the center. I am so grateful for this award so I could conduct my research.
 

Ruth in the field
Ruth Linsky
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Camp Leakey Relatedness; Orangutan Genetics at Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

Thanks to the Barlow Award I was able to purchase critical genetics kits, reagents, and equipment to employ a cutting-edge methodology utilizing passively collected fecal samples and next-generation sequencing.  These funds allowed me to begin work on perfecting and verifying the methods towards my master’s research to acquire an unprecedented level of detail into individual orangutans’ genomes and insight into the population of critically endangered orangutans at the world famous, Camp Leakey.
 

Kristin in the field
Kristín Ocasio-Rodríguez
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Adult male-immature relationships and stress in immature rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

I feel privileged to have worked with the rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) of Cayo Santiago in my homeland, Puerto Rico. I studied how the adult male-immature relationships may be related to stress behavior indicators (e.g., scratches). The Caribbean Primate Center’s fees are far from my budget, and I also had to pay for many other things while there (e.g., meals and lodging). The Barlow Award made my project’s budget more bearable. I am grateful to be a recipient of this award that helped me to complete my field work.
 

Amanda in the field
Amanda Osborne
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Enrichment Assessment for Geriatric Old World Monkeys Under Human Care

For this research, I collected observational, behavioral data from geriatric and young monkeys including Allen's swamp monkeys, De Brazza's monkeys and mandrills. I observed these monkeys for eight weeks at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. During this extended period of time, I was able to stay near the zoo to conduct research, due to the funding of the 2017 Pete and Sandra Barlow Scholarship. Thank you!
 

Blanca in the field
Blanca Ponce
Graduate Student, Primate Behavior MS, (multi-disciplinary MS with Anthropology, Biology, and Psychology)

Project title: Preparing the Yucatan Black Howler Monkey for its return to the wild and assessment of Wildtrack's approach to rehabilitation and release

I am eternally grateful to Pete & Sandra Barlow for their generosity. This award contributed to my very first field excursion and helped me further develop my skills as a primatologist. Pete & Sandra Barlow's award also contributed to Wildtrack's conservation efforts in Belize and helped to provide a better quality of life for monkeys that have been victims of the illegal pet trade.

 

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