Gothic
Home Academics Vita Philosophy Portfolio Resources         


Egyptian ] Greek ] Roman ] Romanesque/Byzantine ] [ Gothic ] Renaissance ] Elizabethan ] Cavalier/Puritan ] Restoration ] Georgian ] Directoire ] Romantic ] Crinoline ] Bustle ] Gay '90's ] Edwardian ]

Back Next

DATES:1200 - 1450 AD
bulletEarly Gothic 1200- 1350 AD
bulletLate Gothic 1350 - 1450
bulletHundred Years War 1337
bulletBlack Death 1348

PRIMARY SOURCES:

bulletStatues
bulletwood carvings
bulletbrass rubbings
bulletilluminated manuscripts

PAINTERS: Uccello, Massaccio, Limbourg brothers, Gotto, Van Eyck brothers

SECONDARY SOURCES:

bulletMedieval Costume and Life - Hartley
bulletMedieval Art - Garland
bulletMedieval Costume Armour and Weapons - Wagner
bulletMedieval Costume in England and France - Houston
bulletJeanne d'Arc: Ses Costumes, Son Armure - Harmand

PLAYS:

bulletKing John - Shakespeare
bulletRichard II - Shakespeare
bulletHenry IV, V & VI - Shakespeare
bulletEdward - Marlowe
bulletSt. Joan- Shaw
bulletMiracle Plays: York Cycle, Wakefield Cycle, Chester Cycle, and Canterbury Tales

 

Gothic Costume History

The costumes of Gothic time are usually divided into two periods: Early Gothic and Late Gothic. The costumes of the Early Gothic (1200-1350) period are more elegant, more sophisticated and simplier in cut than the Romanesque period. Necklines were lower, a little at first and trimming was not so heavy as before. The heavy double-sleeve went out by 1200 and the forearm was revealed because sleeves became tight. Shorter tunics emerged and the cote-hardie reached to the knee and a little above it but women's clothing was invariably long. Late Gothic periods that range from 1350-1450 and styles changed relatively quickly during this time. The period changed from the earlier flowing draperies that metamorphosed, finally, into fabrics that became more and more stiff. In the fifteenth century the extremes were in mostly the upper silhouette. There were crisp pleats, tight belts, padded doublets, and increasingly popular leg-o-mutton sleeve, all the items foreshadowing the squareness of the next hundred years.

In the early Gothic period men wore hair at a pleasant and sensible length often in a bob to the jaw line with a bang across the forehead. Blond hair was popular so many people bleached their hair. Few men wore beards and if they did they were trimmed into two points. Men in the late Gothic period wore hair bobbed also with neatly curled ends and more men began wearing beards that were neatly trimmed accompanied by a small mustache. Later in the period they would wear their hair cropped much like the modern manner of men's hair.

Women in the both periods wore their hair loose and flowing upon their shoulders until they were married where they hair was confined in a bun at the nape. In the earily period women would wear many types of hair pieces to cover it, such as wimple and gorget. The gorget would actually cover the neck while the wimple would cover the head. Later in the period women's necks were exposed but their hair was covered by netting or reticulations like round cages. Nor hair was visible and was plucked to have a high hairline and thin eyebrows.

Colors for this period are jewel like hues much like painting from Jan van Eyke's work. The colors were reds, greens, blues and golds, soft but intense. Interspersed with these colors were brown gray and tan of humbler garments. One particular color that you could associate with the earlier period would be vermillion.

Notable Gothic Costume Elements

Heraldry—A combination of particoloring, coat of arms and family insignia that would note family lineage in coat of arms or clothing.

dork_hor.JPG (20857 bytes) carshalton.JPG (16159 bytes)

Diapering—Putting precious gems and stones on a garment in simple or elaborate patterns most often recognized by a diamond pattern.

Parti-coloring—A multi-colored garment, often with one side embroidered based on the colors and the emblems in a coat of arms.

1200f4.jpg (16908 bytes)

Chaperon—A caped hood with long tail, or liripipe, worn with the face opening around the head and the liripipe wound about the head and then draped under the chin.

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE22DX.HTML
bullethttp://www.gms1.com/ASD/images/scroll2sm.jpg

Doublet—A short jacket or variety of pourpoint sleeved or sleeveless, worn under a closefitting pourpoint, when used as an outer garment it was padded and had a short skirt.

 

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE40AX.HTML
bulletwww.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE25BX.HTML
bullethttp://costumes.org/history/quicherat/Gentilhommealamode.JPG 

Pourpoint—A short jacket with tight sleeves buttoned from elbow to wrist, worn under the cote-hardie; formerly known as a paltock.

bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/quicherat/Grandseigneur.JPG
bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/quicherat/Dameetgentilhomme.JPG
bullethttp://costumes.org/history/quicherat/Grandseigneureerivant.JPG 

Cote-hardie—A shaped garment, tight-fitting around the shoulder, waist and hips. When worn by a woman it usually ended at the hips aor slightly below, often with dagged or scalloped edges. It could be hooked or laced up either the front or the back.

bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/quicherat/Gentilhomme.JPG

Tippet—A band sewn around the elbow of the cote-hardie sleeve with the end hanging as a streamer.

bulletwww.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE19BX.HTML
Houppelande—A loose and comfortable gown of great size introduced during the reign of Charles VI in France which became very fashionable during the reign of Richard II in England. One style worn by men had long, flowing , bell shaped sleeves, a long fitted waist, and floor length or long skirt slit to the knees; another style, known as the bastard houppelande was only to calf length. A high standing collar was usually a part of this flamboyant costume. The woman's version of this robe had a soft, open collar, a short waist, a full skirt, and a long flowing sleeves.
bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE27BX.HTML
bullethttp://www.weilprints.com/Costume/images/print12.jpg
bullethttp://www.softcom.net/users/unicorn/medwed.jpg
bullet
Hennin—A truncated cone or steeple headdress with a veil completely covering the female hairdo.
bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE24AX.HTML
bulletwww.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE24AX.HTML
bullethttp://www.softcom.net/users/unicorn/hennin.jpg
Points—Metal tipped ribbons or lacings sewed in corresponding pairs to sleeves and armseyes or to doublet and hose. http://www.pipcom.com/~tempus/landsknecht/index.html
Poulaines/Crackows—A long-tipped hose and shoe introduced during the reign of Richard II and named after the city of Crackow in Poland; later the length of the toe became so long it had to be tied to the knee.
bullethttp://costumes.org/history/medieval/1380english.jpg
bullet 

 

Liripipe—Still remained form the chaperon as a tail of material coming form the donut shape of the roundlet and draping under the chin and over one shoulder.

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE30BX.HTML 

Reticulation—Decorative metal cages which confined the hair at the side of a woman's head.

bullethttp://costumes.org/history/medieval/1380english.jpg
bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/medieval/headress/countessarundell13th.GIF

Escoffin—As tall, richly brocaded headdress, sometimes shaped like two horns, sometimes like a narrow, tall turban; usually had a veil of fine lawn about a yard wide.

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE22CX.HTML 
bulletwww.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE19BX.HTML
bulletwww.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE27AX.HTML
bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/medieval/headress/countessarundell13th.GIF

Gorget—A wimple or cover-chief worn under the chin and tucked under the neckline of the gown.

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE20BX.HTML 
Dagging—Scallops, crosses and points that would decorate the edge of the fabric and functionally would finish the edges.

Roundel—A headdress made of a thick roll of material with a scarf or liripipe hanging down one side and draped over the shoulder.

bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/medieval/1380english.jpg
bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE27DX.HTML 

Pomander—A ball or hollow ornament often made of filigree, containing a sponge of perfume, suspended from a necklace or girdle.

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE21AX.HTML 
bullethttp://costumes.org/history/medieval/mcafee/medlady4.gif 
bullet 

Tabard—Square piece of fabric with a hole in the middle, to be worn over the armor.

 

Short Gown—A garment tailored at the shoulders and gathered at the waist with a cord that would be cut at the knees. Undergraduate gown of today.

bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE24CX.HTML
bullethttp://costumes.org/history/medieval/1380english.jpg
bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/medieval/14thbraun3.jpg
bullethttp://www.amazon.com/covers/0/48/629/060/0486290603.l.gif
Long Gown—Same as the short gown but fuller and all the way to the floor. Graduate gowns of today
bullethttp://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE27DX.HTML
bullethttp://www.flightofthedragon.com/kyl/clipart/armsarmour/gown.gif
bullethttp://www.costumes.org/history/imsi/berryparty.jpg
Sideless Surcote—A woman's over-gown cut away at the sides from under the arms to the hips to show the cote-hardie or kirtle underneath; it was usually worn with a plastron at the front of the figure. It remained as a ceremonial dress for women during the latter of this period.  
Coif—A close fitting cap tied under the chin.  
Sugar Loaf - Men's hat. Made of felt in the shape of a sugar loaf.
bullet http://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE22AX.HTML
bullethttp://www.southern.net/wm/rh/img/december.jpg 
bullethttp://www.southern.net/wm/rh/img/december.jpg
Other useful Sites"
bullethttp://romancereaderatheart.com/medieval/timeline/
 
 

horizontal rule

This page is the property of Scott R. Robinson and may not reflect the opinions of CWU nor any of its departments
Material on this web site may be used for educational purposed, if this footer is included.  
Grateful appreciation is extended for all the links that assist in sharing this information with my classes.
All Rights Reserved  2000 - 2010
Webmaster