Dr. Cynthia D. Coe

"Time, the condition of human existence, is above all the condition of the irreparable." -- Emmanuel Levinas, "Some Thoughts on the Philosophy of Hitlerism"

"Problem-posing education affirms men and women as beings in the process of becoming -- as unfinished, uncompleted beings in and with a likewise uncompleted reality. Indeed, in contrast to other animals who are unfinished, but not historical, people know themselves to be unfinished; they are aware of their incompletion. In this incompletion and this awareness lie the very roots of education as an exclusively human manifestation. The unfinished character of human beings and the transformational character of reality necessitate that education be an ongoing activity." -- Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed.

Courses Taught | Curriculum Vitae | Current Research

Dr. Cynthia D. Coe

Dr. Cynthia D. Coe
Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies
Central Washington University
400 E. University Way
Ellensburg, WA 98926-7555
Office: Language & Literature 318
Phone: 509-963-2008
Email: coecy@cwu.edu

Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies | Women's and Gender Studies Program

My interests in philosophy generally gravitate towards the broad issue of how subjects become subjects, and the ethical, social, and political implications of that process: the role of temporality, gender, race, embodiment, history, and social interaction. My teaching and research are in the areas of post-Kantian Continental philosophy and feminist theory. I also have interests in philosophy of race, philosophy of history, and social and political philosophy. In my spare time, I like to serve on committees, assess student learning, and collect anti-suffrage cartoons.

I am a program faculty in the Women's and Gender Studies Program, and serve as a member of their steering committee.

I received my Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Oregon in 2000, and my B.A. in philosophy from Middlebury College in 1994.

Fall 2010 courses: DHC 140 Trauma: Memory, History, and Identity | PHIL 355 Contemporary Thought
Winter 2011 course: PHIL 358: Existentialism
Spring 2011 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy | PHIL 357: Race, Class, and Gender: Philosophical Perspectives Fall 2011 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy | PHIL 325: Women and Philosophy
Winter 2012 course: PHIL 378: Philosophy of Love
Spring 2012 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy | PHIL 354: Western Philosophy III
Fall 2012 courses: DHC 140: Trauma: Memory, History, Identity | PHIL 357: Race, Class, and Gender: Philosophical Perspectives
Winter 2013 course: PHIL 358: Existentialism
Spring 2013 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy | PHIL 488: Junior Seminar - The Problem of Evil
Fall 2013 course: PHIL 325: Women and Philosophy
Winter 2014 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy |PHIL 459: Phenomenology
Spring 2014 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy |PHIL 354: Western Philosophy III
Fall 2015 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy | 325: Women and Philosophy
Winter 2016 courses: PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy (syllabus) | PHIL 358: Existentialism (syllabus)
Spring 2016 courses: PHIL 150: Critical Thinking: Issues of Life and Death (syllabus) | PHIL 354: Kant and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (syllabus)

Spring 2016 office hours: M-Th 9-10 a.m., MW 12-1 p.m., and by appointment.

Site created and maintained by Cynthia D. Coe.
Last updated: 30 March 2016