CWUTheatre NewsTheatre Newshttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/newsen-usShe Kills Monsters Finds Truth through Fantasy Gameshttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3234Mon, 28 Nov 2016 07:57:23<p><em><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/she%20kills%20monsters%20kooser%20puppets.jpeg" style="width: 450px; height: 253px;"></em></p><p><em>She Kills Monsters</em>, by Qui Nguyen, is a comedic, yet poignant, journey into the world of fantasy role-playing games (RPGs). The Central Washington University Central Theatre Ensemble production begins December 1.</p><p>The play explores the gamut of relationships among women, as siblings, classmates, coworkers, lovers, and loved ones. Through role-playing, the characters are able to come to terms with excruciating losses, such as the death of a sister. And ultimately, they are able to face their own realities and their futures</p><p>According to the <em>New York Times</em>, "It will slash and shapeshift its way into your heart." The <em>Denver Post </em>called it " . . . droll, witty and geeky in the best sense of the word . . ." Winner of the 2013 AATE Distinguished Play Award, <em>She Kills Monsters</em> is directed by Central Washington University’s Patrick Dizney, professor of Theatre Arts. “It is a romp,” says Dizney. “The most fun you can have in a theatre!”</p><p>For patrons who may not be knowledgeable about the RPG culture and the vocabulary of <em>Dungeons and Dragons</em>, around which the play revolves, the production team has developed “A Visitors Guide to the World of the Play.” The material also includes information on the playwright and numerous awards the play has garnered. The material was developed by Robert Hanson, a master’s candidate in Theatre Production. The guide can be downloaded for free at http://bit.ly/2fCClSS.</p><p>Local artist Brian Kooser has joined the production design team and has been working with CWU students in the creation of the special monster puppets. Kooser is well known for his larger-than-life characters that are seen throughout the region at parades and special events such as the Fremont Solstice Fair in Seattle and Ellensburg Buskers.</p><p><em>She Kills Monsters</em> will be performed December 1 and 2 at 7:30 p.m. in McConnell Auditorium. A special talkback session with the cast will be hosted by CWU Women’s and Gender Studies immediately after the performance on December 1. On December 3, there will be two performances: one at 4:00 p.m., and a special10:00 p.m. showing. Between the performances, a student club will host RPG game tables in the theatre lobby for novices as well as those skilled at RPGs. There will also be a matinee performance at 2:00 p.m. on December 4.</p><p>Tickets are $12 general admission; $10 for seniors and students under 18 years old, and $8 for CWU students with ID. Advance purchase is recommended. Tickets can be purchased online at www.cwu.edu/theatre/tickets or by calling 509-963-1429. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the Wildcat Shop Customer Service at the Student Union and Recreation Building.</p><p>This play is suitable for mature audiences.&nbsp; Some material is inappropriate for children under 17. The play includes language and situations some patrons may consider offensive.</p><p>Parking is free in all university lots after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in residential housing lots and in specially designated spaces.</p><p>Photo: Monster puppet workshop. Photo by Scott Robinson</p><p><em>CWU is the only state institution that offers a bachelor of fine arts degree with highly competitive programs in musical theatre, performance, and design and production.</em></p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br></br>Holiday Favorite Red Curtain Broadway Revue Celebrates Musical Theater http://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3229Tue, 15 Nov 2016 13:55:43<p>A bit of Broadway comes to Ellensburg with the <em>Red Curtain Broadway Revue</em>, an evening of favorites from a variety of Broadway classics both old and new. Production numbers include “Forget About the Boy”, from <em>Thoroughly Modern Millie</em>, “Shadowland,” from <em>The Lion King</em>, and “Bui Doi,” from <em>Miss Saigon</em>, along with classics such as “Danny Boy,” and “Blackbird,” by the The Beatles.</p><p>The <em>Revue</em> features students in Central Washington University’s bachelor of fine arts musical theatre performance program, and spotlights their singing, dancing, and acting skills in a variety of scenes, solos, and excerpts from musical theatre. Choreographed, directed, and performed by CWU students, the production combines the enthusiasm and exuberance of youth with professional stage skills, along with serious talent.</p><p>This year also features choreography by new faculty member Casey Craig. Craig joins the faculty after a successful musical career across the northwest, most recently in Seattle Musical Theatre’s production of <em>9 to 5</em>.</p><p>The <em>Red Curtain Broadway Revue</em> will be performed November 17, 18, and 19 at 7:30 p.m. in McConnell Auditorium. There will also be a matinee performance at 2:00 p.m. on November 20. Tickets are $12 general admission, $10 for seniors/students, and $7 for CWU students with ID. Tickets can be purchased online at www.cwu.edu/theatre/tickets or by calling 509-963-1429. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the Wildcat Shop Customer Service at the Student Union and Recreation Building.</p><p>Parking is free in all university lots after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in residential housing lots and in specially designated spaces.</p><p>CWU is the only state institution that offers a bachelor of fine arts degree with highly competitive programs in musical theatre, performance, and design and production.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>November 15, 2016</p></br></br>CWU’s "Gruesome Playground Injuries" Explores the Emotional Bond of Painhttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3221Thu, 03 Nov 2016 09:53:13<p>From school infirmaries to hospital wards, Kayleen and Doug meet, reconnect, and bond through physical and emotional pain. Rajiv Joseph’s <em>Gruesome Playground Injuries</em>, a Central Washington University Theatre Arts student workshop production, explores how characters develop a sympathetic intimacy by sharing their private traumas.</p><p><em>Gruesome Playground Injuries</em> will be performed at 7:30 p.m., November 10, 11, and 12, in Studio 119 (McConnell Hall 119). All tickets are $5, and may be purchased online at www.cwu.edu/theatre/tickets or by calling 509-963-1429. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the Wildcat Shop Customer Service at the Student Union and Recreation Building.</p><p>This production has been led by BA Theatre Studies senior Allison Price, who will be directing the show. The Central Theatre Club and the CWU student chapter of the United States Institute for Theatre Technology are providing support for the production.&nbsp;</p><p>Academic mentor, Theatre Arts professor Patrick Dizney, describes Price as, “one of the artistic leaders in the next generation of theatre-makers.”</p><p>This is Price’s second directing experience at CWU.&nbsp; This past summer she spent three months as a directing intern at Smock Alley Theatre, in Dublin, Ireland.&nbsp; Prior to the summer experience she spent a term at University of Hull (UK).</p><p>Price is a graduate of West Valley High School in Spokane.&nbsp; She is the daughter of Tim and Wendy Price of Spokane, WA.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Parking is free in all university lots after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in residential housing lots and in specially designated spaces.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>November 3, 2016</p></br></br>Crash course: Falls, fights and fires are all in a day’s work at Seattle stunt schoolhttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3220Thu, 27 Oct 2016 08:17:15<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/CWUstuntmanschool.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 305px; margin-left: 4px; margin-right: 4px; float: right;">David Boushey, a Hollywood Hall of Famer [and CWU alumnus] helps stunt performers learn how to fall from dizzying heights, take hours’ worth of punches — and break into a tough business.</p><p>THE STUDENTS ARE trying to look stoic, standing in a gravel parking lot near Bothell under the scorching August sun — but they all know that, by the end of the day, every one of them is going to be set on fire.</p><p>As they burn, they’ll be scrutinized by their instructors, professional stunt performers, who could potentially make or break their budding careers.</p><p>Read more of this story in the Seattle Times' <a href="http://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/crash-course-falls-fights-and-fires-are-all-in-a-days-work-at-seattle-stunt-school/" target="_blank">Pacific NW Magazine</a>.</p><p>Story by Brendan Kiley/photo by Benjamin Benschneider</p><p>October 27, 2016</p>CWU’s Mary Poppins Is “Practically Perfect in Every Way”http://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3168Mon, 02 May 2016 07:31:30<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/Mary%20poppins.jpg" style="width: 124px; height: 90px; margin: 4px; float: right;">Experience the eternal magic of Nanny Mary Poppins in Central Washington University Central Theatre Ensemble’s <em>Mary Poppins</em>. Based on the series of books by P.L. Travers and the 1964 Disney film, this stage musical production will have you laughing, crying, and singing along to all your favorite songs.</p><p>When an extraordinary nanny appears on their doorstop, life for the Banks family is turned upside-down in the most “supercallifragilisticexpialidocious” way. Before you can say “spit-spot,” Mary, Bert, and crew take the wayward, yet wistful Banks children—and their parents—on a life-changing adventure.</p><p><em>Mary Poppins</em> will be performed at 7:30 p.m. May 6-7 and 12-14, in the McConnell Auditorium. There will be two matinee performances at 2:00 p.m. on May 8 and May 15. Reserved seating tickets are $15/20 general admission (ages 18-64); $12/15 seniors (65 and older); $12/15 for non-CWU students; and $8 for CWU students with ID. Advance ticket purchases are recommended.</p><p>In addition, the Dakota Café is offering dinner packages for this show on Fridays and Saturdays. Dinner packages must be purchased by Monday the week of the event.</p><p>Families will enjoy the opportunity to meet the cast, and take a selfie, at a special scholarship fundraiser, the Mary Poppins Ice Cream and Tea Social (https://www.facebook.com/events/1150313028320650/). The event will take place in the CWU Sue Lombard Room immediately following the Mother’s Day matinee performance, May 8. Ice cream has been generously donated by Winegar’s. This event is pre-ticketed with a $5 scholarship donation and $2 ticket fee.</p><p>A special alumni relations event will follow the May 15 matinee in the Sue Lombard room.</p><p>Tickets for all the <em>Mary Poppins </em>events can be purchased online at www.cwu.edu/theatre/tickets. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the Wildcat Shop Customer Service in the Student Union and Recreation Building, or by phone at 509-963-1429.</p><p>Families of all ages can enjoy this production together. Younger children should be able to sit next to their parent quietly for at least one hour.</p><p>Parking at CWU lots is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in specially marked spaces and in residential hall lots.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>May 2, 2016</p></br>CWU theater carefully selects props for each showhttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3158Wed, 30 Mar 2016 08:08:32<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/Barnett.jpg" style="width: 480px; height: 320px;"></p><p>When the curtains on McConnell Auditorium's stage open and the main character moves across the stage, people already have answers to simple questions like what time period the character lives in and whether he's rich or poor.</p><p>Even before the character speaks a word, a carefully chosen combination of props on stage tell the viewer time, place and status, among other things.</p><p>David Barnett, scene shop manager and McConnell stage manager, has been working for the Central Theatre Department for 21 seasons, and has helped students carefully choose and create props for the five to six shows produced at Central Washington University each year.</p><p>Read more of this story in the <a href="http://www.dailyrecordnews.com/members/cwu-theater-carefully-selects-props-for-each-show/article_cdea81ca-f5cd-11e5-b4c7-ef9e1b01ae9b.html">Daily Record</a>.</p>CWU play explores real-life drama using real-life languagehttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3154Mon, 08 Feb 2016 07:55:13<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/dizney2.jpg" style="width: 427px; height: 320px;"></p><p>Central Washington University theater students will assume the role of strangers taking a drama class in the upcoming “Circle Mirror Transformation” play set to debut next week.</p><p>“Circle Mirror Transformation” tells the story of an unlikely collection of four strangers who enroll in Marty’s six-week adult creative drama class. The story unfolds like an indie film. The group plays Marty’s imaginative (and sometimes awkward) theater games, and as relationships develop, real-life drama unfolds.</p><p>Read more of this story in the <a href="http://www.dailyrecordnews.com/news/cwu-play-explores-real-life-drama-using-real-life-language/article_7caf0d16-cc61-11e5-a746-fff52bc7fde7.html">Daily Record</a>.</p>Overcoming tragedy through theaterhttp://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3152Tue, 29 Dec 2015 12:50:44<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/dizney2.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 300px;"></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.4;">A Washington state professor with ties to the area came up with a plan to help Umpqua Community College students heal from the Oct. 1 mass shooting.</span></p><p>Central Washington University Assistant Professor of Performance Patrick Dizney, who grew up in Eugene and has ties to the area, believes that extending encouragement and a helping hand can help a community heal.</p><p>Read more of this story in<a href="http://www.nrtoday.com/entertainment/20361066-113/overcoming-tragedy-through-theater"> NR Today</a>.</p><p><em>[news release]</em></p><p><strong><span style="line-height: 1.4;">CWU Theatre Professor Reaches Out to Umpqua Students after Tragedy</span></strong></p><p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/dizney.jpg" style="width: 104px; height: 104px; margin: 4px; float: right;">Sometimes just extending encouragement and a helping hand can help a community heal. Patrick Dizney, Central Washington University professor of theatre arts, hopes to do that with several initiatives supporting students and staff at Umpqua Community College (UCC), which was the site of a mass shooting on October 1.</p><p>Dizney recently visited the students and faculty at Umpqua, both as a representative of CWU and as the incoming regional chair of Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF) Region VII. While at Umpqua, he had the opportunity to get to know some of the students in this small department.</p><p>“I think these kids are a little isolated and need to feel the support and concern of the larger theatre and academic communities.” With that goal in mind, Dizney was able to extend significant gestures of support to the UCC theatre community.</p><p>Dizney has raised funds and donations to sponsor two theatre students from Umpqua to attend the regional festival held February 15-19 in Denver. KCACTF will waive festival registration and arrange conference housing.</p><p>Dizney has also started a GoFundMe! initiative to cover flights, food, and miscellaneous expenses for the two Umpqua students (www.gofundme.com/2pdz2edg), which has already exceeded its goal. A private donor has offered enough frequent flier miles to fund the flights. The Kennedy Center festival region has also offered to waive production participation fees of one year for productions at Umpqua allowing more theatre artists to visit the Umpqua campus and respond to productions mounted by the fragile department.</p><p>“I grew up in Eugene and spent a couple of spring breaks and one summer in Umpqua, so the community is close to my heart in many ways,” said Dizney. “I have also been developing a platform at CWU to utilize theatre as a means of facilitating social change and this seemed to be a great opportunity—empowering and healing through theatre. Plus, it's just the right thing to do—this community is hurting and we are in a position to offer some assistance.”</p><p>With support from his CWU theatre arts colleagues, Dizney will remount the upcoming CWU production of <em>Circle Mirror Transformation</em> on the Umpqua campus March 4 and 5.</p><p>“<em>Circle Mirror Transformation </em>deals with themes of developing relationships, building better lives, and the human capacity for positive change,” said Dizney. “This is exactly what CWU theatre hopes can happen for the people of Roseburg, with the encore production.”</p><p>Proceeds of the ticket sales will be contributed to a scholarship named for one of the victims, Quinn Cooper, who was a drama student at Umpqua Community College.&nbsp; While in Roseburg, CWU students will offer additional workshops for drama students at Umpqua.<br><br>“I am so very proud of the work the faculty and staff of the department do for our own students,” said Scott Robinson, chair, CWU theatre arts. “And I am even more impressed with how our professors show our theatre students how they can themselves be instruments of change in a world of increased turmoil.”<br><br>“I think the worst thing is for people to feel they are alone in situations like this,” said Dizney. “We are not performing miracles, only reaching out a hand to say ‘hey, we're here for you and would like to support and grow with you.’ We all need to hear that more often.”</p><p>For more information on supporting Umpqua students, contact Patrick Dizney, CWU Theatre Arts, 503-449-2112, dizneyp@cwu.edu</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>December 29, 2015</p></span style="line-height: 1.4;"></span style="line-height: 1.4;"></br></br></br></br></br>Fun, Family-friendly ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas Opens December 3http://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3149Tue, 01 Dec 2015 08:38:15<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/Twas4web2.jpg" style="width: 156px; height: 113px; margin: 4px; float: left;">Follow the wild holiday adventures of a mouse, an elf, and a spunky little girl who just won't take no for an answer on their quest to find out why Santa missed their house last year. Central Washington University Central Theatre Ensemble’s <em>‘Twas the Night Before Christmas</em> provides a charming night of holiday entertainment for children of all ages.</p><p>“Such a playful spirit romps through <em>'Twas the Night Before Christmas</em>, you might think the show itself was a product of Santa’s workshop,” commented one critic.</p><p><em>'Twas the Night Before Christmas</em> will be performed at 7:30 p.m., December 3, 4, and 5 at the Milo Smith Tower Theatre. There will be a matinee performance at 2:00 p.m. on December 6. Tickets are $15 for general admission, $12 for seniors and non-CWU students, and $8 for CWU students with ID. Advance ticket purchase recommended. Tickets can be purchased online at www.cwu.edu/theatre/tickets or by calling 509-963-1429. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the Wildcat Shop Customer Service at the Student Union and Recreation Building.</p><p>Parking is free in all university lots after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in residential housing lots and in specially designated spaces.</p><p>Parental Guidance<br>Families of all ages can enjoy this production together.<br>Children should be able to sit next to their parent quietly for at least 1 hour.</p><p><br>CWU is the only state institution that offers a bachelor of fine arts degree with highly competitive programs in musical theatre, performance, and design and production.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>November 30, 2015</p></br></br></br></br>Theatre and War: The Campaign to Win Vietnamese Hearts and Minds http://www.cwu.edu/theatre/node/3146Thu, 05 Nov 2015 14:15:02<p><img alt="" src="/theatre/sites/cts.cwu.edu.theatre/files/images/jayandjerry.jpeg" style="width: 450px; height: 253px;"></p><p>Sometimes “water-cooler talk” can develop into something much more profound. That's what Jay Ball and Jerry Dougherty, faculty in the theater arts department, discovered when their low-key chats about international affairs developed into serious discussions, and ultimately, “a great faculty collaboration.”</p><p>Ball and Dougherty co-authored "Cultural Seeding: Van Tac Vu Theatre and Pacification during the Vietnam War," a paper on the American “hearts and minds” campaign during the Vietnam War.</p><p>“I was an international relations major as an undergrad and most of my research as a theatre historian has been focused on political hot spots around the world,” said Ball, professor of theatre and performance studies. “Jerry has been to those hot spots, and ever since I arrived at CWU three years ago, we have routinely had water cooler talk about international affairs and his military experiences.”</p><p>Dougherty, CWU’s Theatre Arts department production manager, is an Iraqi War veteran and a current Lt. Colonel in the US Army Reserve. He has 23 years of service as both a cavalry and logistics officer.</p><p>“When I had the opportunity to propose a paper—in this case, on the theatrical properties of American ‘hearts and minds’ efforts during the Vietnam War—I popped the question to Jerry: want to co-write a piece of original theatre history with me?” continued Ball. “He was surprised, then shrugged his shoulders and said, ‘Sure. I don't know what you want me to do, but let's do it.’”</p><p>According to Ball, winning "hearts and minds" was shorthand for the American strategy of convincing rural Vietnamese people to withdraw their support for the Viet Cong and rally to the cause of South Vietnamese government. To achieve this, the US military deployed a range of so-called psychological warfare techniques, including leaflets, helicopters with massive speakers to broadcast messages (think the film Apocalypse Now), medical assistance teams, as well as using radio and television. This type of integrated information campaign had its start in Viet Nam, Dougherty related.</p><p>“The subject of our paper, Van Tac Vu, were specially trained theatre troupes who would go from village to village putting on magic shows, short plays, and sing-alongs—all with a pro-government message,” said Ball. “Since General Petraeus revolutionized the thinking of the US military about counter-insurgency during his time in Iraq, all of these "hearts and minds" operations are being studied again for their application to contemporary conflicts.”</p><p>Dougherty mined incredible research from places Ball would not have known how to access, like the Army War College.</p><p>“The Army War College in Pennsylvania and the Command and General Staff College in Kansas are open to any one in the military who wants to do research,” said Dougherty. “I was able to access papers and other research that had already been published, such thesis projects on the subject.”</p><p>“Jerry was also able to translate government documents and military manuals into civilian English,” said Ball. “More than that, he has been in a war zone. He just brought an insider's view—and veteran's understanding—to this work that has made it infinitely richer than I could have done on my own.”</p><p>They will present the paper the national American Society for Theatre Research as part of the organization's "Theatre and War" working group. It's highly competitive, premiere theatre scholarship conference held November 5-8, in Portland, Oregon.</p><p>“I’m really excited about this paper, but I’m also very interested in digging deeper into this subject,” said Dougherty. “There are still stones left to be turned over.”</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p><p>Photo: Jerry Dougherty and Jay Ball</p></br>