CWUNews FeedNews Feedhttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/newsen-us Central Washington University has been ranked #1 as 2021 Best Bachelor's Degrees in Human Services/Social Services (in the category of: Online Programs)!https://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2636Wed, 12 May 2021 15:17:14<p><a href="https://study.com/degrees/online-bachelors-degrees-in-human-services.html" target="_blank">What is an Online Bachelor&#39;s Degree in Human Services (Social Services)?</a></p> <p>An bachelor&#39;s degree in human services is tailored for those with a passion for advocacy. In these programs students learn to help those in need.</p> <p>In their coursework, students will consider the discipline from many different standpoints, developing an overarching understanding of the problems facing the communities they will serve. Research, writing, analysis, interpersonal communication strategies, case management, are all be points of emphasis throughout the program. This often involves students learning both theory and practice, in an interdisciplinary manner, with some skills or knowledge overlapping with related fields.</p> <p>Best Online Bachelor&#39;s Degrees in Human Services (Social Services)</p> <p>1. Central Washington University</p> <table border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" height="111" width="1805"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;">Tuition</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Acceptance Rate</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Graduation Rate</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Financial Aid%</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Placement Services</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Career Services</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Accepts</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;">$8,273</td> <td style="text-align: center;">85%</td> <td style="text-align: center;">58%</td> <td style="text-align: center;">90%</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Yes</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Yes</td> <td style="text-align: center;">AP Credits</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Study.com have looked at hundreds of schools across the country and analyzed data to compile our list of the top twenty best online bachelor&#39;s degrees in human services. Human services is a complex professional field that involves elements of social work, counseling, and administration, with potential careers in areas like mental health, drug addiction counseling, and the criminal justice system. They looked at how well each school&#39;s curriculum blended courses from diverse fields like psychology, sociology, counseling, criminal justice, and business. They also looked at the levels of convenience and flexibility in each school&#39;s online program as well as affordability. If you are interested in potentially pursuing a career in the human services and are in need of an online learning format, this list is an excellent resource for getting a head start on your education!</p> <p>Central Washington University takes the top spot on Study.com&#39;s list for best online bachelor&#39;s degrees in Human Services (Social Services) with its online Bachelor of Science in Social Services. This program blends key concepts from the field of sociology with essential aspects of the ground work of social and human service careers. This degree applies more abstract, theoretical concepts to practical situations in a wide variety of human services professions. Online social services students at Central Washington also have numerous opportunities to employ their skills and knowledge through engaging seminars and service-learning projects with human services organizations.</p> </table border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" height="111" width="1805"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;"></td style="text-align: center;">Social Science Research Tools Certificatehttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2635Wed, 28 Apr 2021 10:06:10<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/sociology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.sociology/files/images/SSCertFlier.JPG" style="width: 453px; height: 600px;" /></p> <p>Solve Research Challenges Using Interdisciplinary Techniques</p> <p><a href="https://www.cwu.edu/sociology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.sociology/files/documents/SS%20Cert.%20Version%202.docx" target="_blank">click for pdf version of flier</a></p> The Department of Sociology at Central Washington University is committed to a diverse, equitable, and inclusive campus, community, and societyhttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2627Wed, 03 Jun 2020 18:12:21<p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="line-height:150%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif">The Department of Sociology at Central Washington University is committed to a diverse, equitable, and inclusive campus, community, and society. We are also committed to promoting conversations about the challenges faced by our society. A sociological lens affords us the opportunity to understand the latest incidents of police who have killed George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and others. Racist violence at the hands of police forces has a long history in America (1). Today unarmed black people are nearly four times more likely than unarmed white people to be killed by police (2). Native American people and Latinx people are also significantly more likely to be killed by the police (3). This is not just the result of a few outliers in the justice system. As University of Maryland sociology professor, Rashawn Ray, writes &ldquo;bad apples come from rotten trees&mdash;law enforcement agencies imbued with structural racism&rdquo; (4). Racism is sewn into the fabric of society, shaping American institutions including the criminal justice system, healthcare, and education (5). To say &ldquo;Black lives matter&rdquo; is to understand and to challenge the legacy of white supremacy in this country (6). </span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="line-height:150%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif">We write in support of our Black and other racialized students, faculty, and staff who face challenges of racism that white students, faculty, and staff do not face. We support the rights of peaceful protesters in cities across the country, including here in Ellensburg and Washington, who demand justice, accountability, and change. We encourage our <span style="color:black">elected leaders at all levels to listen seriously to these voices and enact meaningful, evidence-based changes in our justice system. </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="line-height:150%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">If you need academic support as you finish the quarter, or as you move forward, please contact your course instructors, advisors, other faculty, or the department chairs &ndash; </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="line-height:150%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Pamela McMullin-Messier</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="line-height:150%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">&nbsp;</p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="line-height:150%"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="line-height:150%"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="line-height:150%"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="line-height:150%"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="line-height:150%"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black">LLAS Presents speaker Dr. Nelson Pichard "The First Wave: Mexican Farm Labor Activism During the Great Depression" February 7, 2020 https://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2624Wed, 08 Jan 2020 11:46:34<p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><i><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">Prof. Nelson Pichardo Almanzar is a member of the faculty of the Sociology Department as well as director of its Ethnic Studies program.&nbsp; He has been a member of the Central community since 1999.&nbsp; He has published a book (American Fascism and the New Deal) describing how the Anglo elite of California reacted to pro-labor New Deal policies and the activism of both Mexicans and American farm laborers as well as published several articles focusing on various social movements.</span></span></i></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><i><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">Dr. Pichardo will give a presentation entitled, &quot;The First Wave: Mexican Farm Labor Activism During the Great Depression&quot; which is based on his dissertation research.</span></span></i></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><i><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">Feburary 7, 2020; 12:00-12:50 PM; Black Hall, room 105 </span></span></i></span></span></p> </p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="color:black"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="color:black"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"></span style="color:black">Brene Brown, Qualitative Researcher talks on 1Ahttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2623Tue, 26 Nov 2019 10:26:08<p>Brene Brown, Social Sciencist, talks on <a href="https://the1a.org/audio/#/shows/2019-11-26/brene-brown-the-quest-for-true-belonging-and-the-courage-to-stand-alone-rebroadcast/119447/@00:00">1A Podcast (rebroadcast)</a>: The Quest For True Belonging And The Courage To Stand Alone.</p> <p>&quot;In this age of increased polarization, maybe our ideas about belonging need to be re-examined&quot; Brene Brown</p> <p>Sociology Department Students can hear about real world qualitative research on the 1A podcast or in the TedTalk <a href="https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_listening_to_shame">Listening to Shame</a>&nbsp;</p> <p>Book- <em>Braving the Wilderness: The Quest For True Belonging And The Courage To Stand Alone -</em>Random House|New York</p> <p>Bio: Casandra Brené Brown PhD LMSW is a research professor at the University of Houston where she holds the Huffington Foundation &ndash; Brené Brown Endowed Chair at The Graduate College of Social Work.</p> Governor selects Ciara White as CWU’s new student trusteehttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2583Fri, 23 Jun 2017 11:31:39<p><img alt="Ciara White Student Trustee" src="/sociology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.sociology/files/images/Ciara%20White_Student%20Trustee%20Picture.jpg" style="width: 230px; height: 299px; float: left; margin-left: 8px; margin-right: 8px;">Governor Jay Inslee today named Ciara White as the student member of the Central Washington University Board of Trustees for 2017-18.</p><p>White, 20, who will be a senior during her term, is majoring in social services with a minor in sociology, women and gender studies, and law and justice. She is a McNair Scholar and has worked as an assistant in the Office of Student Involvement.</p><p>“Ciara White has an impressive record of involvement and achievement,” Inslee said. “As a trustee, she will represent the students well and make informed decisions to benefit the entire university community.”</p><p>White, a graduate of Mount Rainier High School in Des Moines, Washington, is a former Barto Hall resident assistant and previously served as president of the Black Student Union as well as treasurer of CWU’s SISTERS! Club.</p><p>She also attended the Chavez-King Leadership Institute for Social Change and has been involved in various volunteer and mentorship programs at local middle and elementary schools. This summer, she will complete an internship at the Kent Chamber of Commerce, primarily assisting it with promoting and planning events.</p><p>“When I saw that applications were being accepted for the student trustee position, I felt compelled to apply,” she said. “I truly believe that universities have the potential to make incredible differences in students’ lives.”</p><p>White said her number one goal as student trustee will be to “make sure our students’ voices are heard at Central.” To that end, she hopes to work on improving retention rates, particularly for students of color. She would also like to help establish more outreach to non-traditional students to help them obtain an education.</p><p>“As a trustee, I will represent Washington but also provide a student viewpoint,” she continued. “Everyone has a voice and I want to be the voice of our school.”</p><p>All of the state’s six public baccalaureate institutions have a student seat on its governing bodies. The student trustees serve one-year terms and are full voting members on all issues except matters relating to hiring or discipline of personnel, tenure of faculty, and collective bargaining agreements. White’s term will end on June 30, 2018.</p><p>White was among a list of five nominees for student trustee submitted by CWU to the governor.</p><p>Media contact: Richard Moreno, director of content development, 509-963-2714, Richard.Moreno@cwu.edu.<br>Thursday, June 22, 2017</p></br>Sweet Cases CWU Social Services Class Video with Professor Strawnhttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2576Thu, 19 Jan 2017 09:03:00<p><a href="/sociology/node/2577" target="_blank">Sweet Cases CWU Social Services Class Video with Professor Strawn</a></p>CWU Makes a Hard Transition a Little Easier for Local Foster Kidshttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2575Thu, 19 Jan 2017 08:47:06<p><img alt="" src="/sociology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.sociology/files/images/sociology_sweet_cases_stuffing-copy2.jpg" style="width: 497px; height: 263px; float: left; margin-left: 8px; margin-right: 8px;">Putting their educations and hearts to work, Central Washington University students created special duffle bags, called Sweet Cases, for local children entering foster care.</p><p>Student volunteers from the departments of sociology, family and child life, law and justice, and social services huddled together around a large conference table to decorate and assemble 30 Sweet Cases.</p><p>This project is especially meaningful for Starlett Burnett, a recent CWU social sciences and psychology minor graduate and former foster child.</p><p>“I remember moving and having to shove all of my personal belongings into black garbage bags,” said Burnett of her five years in the foster care system. “It’s good for them (foster children) not to feel like garbage.”</p><p>Each year, about 400,000 children are placed in foster care nationally; 30 to 40 here in Kittitas County, according to Jessica Strawn, senior faculty lecturer in the departments of sociology and social services.</p><p>When children are removed from their parent or guardian for safety reasons, they leave their home abruptly and with few belongings packed in whatever is handy, often a trash bag.</p><p>When entering a new and unfamiliar foster home, something as simple as a new decorated duffle of their own can make the transition that much easier.</p><p>CWU students were moved by this knowledge and decided to band together to make a difference.</p><p>“The community donated dollars, students give of their time, and children get the benefit,” said Strawn.</p><p>The full $750 ask was raised through the online fundraising campaign Together We Rise, with much of the money donated by former foster parents and CWU alumni. In just 10 days their fundraising goal was met, surpassing the original 30-day goal. The donations went to purchase 30 mid-sized duffle bags, personal items, and fabric markers.</p><p>Once decorated, each bag was filled with a blanket, hygiene kit, a special stuffed animal, and a pair of CWU mittens. The Sweet Cases will be given to the local Division of Children and Family Services to be distributed to new foster kids in Kittitas County.</p><p>Strawn explained that among the project goals is to expose students to their many career options. As important, is to have them apply their energy in the field as soon as possible.</p><p>“We’re (CWU) passionate about creating a connection between energy on campus and the need in the community,” Strawn said.</p><p>Through their chosen profession as future social services professionals, there will be ample opportunities to help their communities. As is the case for Burnett.</p><p>Burnett now works for Triumph Treatment Services in Yakima as a Parent-Child Assistance Program (P-CAP) advocate. She finds herself on the opposite side of the foster care system—assisting women and their families with community resources to address a myriad of issues.</p><p>And as for the students working toward their degrees…they are actively putting their energies to work to provide some stability and a smile to local foster children here in Kittitas County.</p><p>For information on degrees and certificates in sociology or social services, visit their program web pages.</p><p>If you wish to donate to the Sweet Cases fundraising effort or learn about ways to help foster children, contact Jessica Strawn at 509-963-1370 or jessica.strawn@cwu.edu.</p><p>Photo:&nbsp; CWU students holding the newly decorated and stuffed Sweet Cases.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, public affairs coordinator, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p>CWU Makes a Hard Transition a Little Easier for Local Foster Kidshttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2574Tue, 10 Jan 2017 17:29:17<p><img style="margin: 3px; width: 500px; height: 150px;" alt="Young girl sitting next to plastic bag" src="/sociology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.sociology/files/images/kids-not-trash.png">Putting their educations and hearts to work, Central Washington University social services students are creating special duffle bags, called Sweet Cases, for local children entering foster care.</p><p>Student volunteers will commence decorating 30 Sweet Cases at noon on January 12th near the fourth-floor commons area of Farrell Hall.</p><p>This project is especially meaningful for Starlett Burnett, a recent CWU social sciences and psychology minor graduate and former foster child.</p><p>“I remember moving and having to shove all of my personal belongings into black garbage bags,” said Burnett of her five years in the foster care system. “It’s good for them (foster children) not to feel like garbage.”</p><p>Each year, about 400,000 children are placed in foster care nationally; 30 to 40 here in Kittitas County, according to Jessica Strawn, senior faculty lecturer in the departments of sociology and social services.</p><p>When children are removed from their parent or guardian for safety reasons, they leave their home abruptly and with few belongings packed in whatever is handy, often a trash bag.</p><p>When entering a new and unfamiliar foster home, something as simple as a new decorated duffle of their own can make the transition that much easier.</p><p>CWU students were moved by this knowledge and decided to band together to make a difference.</p><p>“The community donated dollars, students give of their time, and children get the benefit,” said Strawn.</p><p>The full $750 ask was raised through the online fundraising campaign Together We Rise, with much of the money donated by former foster parents and CWU alumni. The donations went to purchase 30 mid-sized duffle bags, personal items, and fabric markers.</p><p>Once decorated, each bag will be filled with a blanket, hygiene kit, and a special stuffed animal. The Sweet Cases will be given to the local Division of Children and Family Services to be distributed to new foster kids in Kittitas County.</p><p>Strawn explained that among the project goals is to expose students to their many career options. As important, is to have them apply their energy in the field as soon as possible.</p><p>“We’re (CWU) passionate about creating a connection between energy on campus and the need in the community,” Strawn said.</p><p>Through their chosen profession as future social services professionals, there will be ample opportunities to help their communities. As is the case for Burnett.</p><p>Burnett now works for Triumph Treatment Services in Yakima as a Parent-Child Assistance Program (P-CAP) advocate. She finds herself on the opposite side of the foster care system—assisting women and their families with community resources to address a myriad of issues.</p><p>And as for the students working toward their degrees…they are actively putting their energies to work to provide some stability and a smile to local foster children here in Kittitas County.</p><p>For information on degrees and certificates in <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/sociology/">sociology</a> or <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/student-achievement/social-services">social services</a>, visit their program web pages.</p><p>If you wish to donate to the Sweet Cases fundraising effort or learn about ways to help foster children, contact Jessica Strawn at 509-963-1370 or <a href="mailto:jessica.strawn@cwu.edu">Jessica.strawn@cwu.edu</a>.</p><p>Photo credit:&nbsp; photo of child is courtesy of Together We Rise.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, public affairs coordinator, 509-963-1484, <a href="mailto:dawn.alford@cwu.edu">dawn.alford@cwu.edu</a>.</p><p>--January 10, 2017</p></a href="mailto:jessica.strawn@cwu.edu"></a href="mailto:dawn.alford@cwu.edu">Why We Still Need Ethnic Studieshttps://www.cwu.edu/sociology/node/2570Fri, 15 Jul 2016 09:00:55<p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/susan-m-shaw/why-we-still-need-ethnic-_b_9009954.html" target="_blank">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/susan-m-shaw/why-we-still-need-ethnic-_b_9009954.html</a></p>