CWUNews FeedNews Feedhttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/newsen-usCWU Science Faculty Offers Amazing Science Fare for Publichttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/node/2495Wed, 04 Sep 2013 13:23:44<p>&nbsp;</p><p><img alt="" src="/science-education/sites/cts.cwu.edu.science-education/files/images/piacsek33-large.jpg" style="width: 481px; height: 320px; ">Once again, the annual Science Is Central Community Lectures and Shows will provide a weeklong series of presentations about everything from electricity to explosions. Central Washington University science faculty from a variety of disciplines will provide a fascinating look at how science helps us understand the magic and wonder of the universe.</p><p>Science Is Central will take place in the evenings from September 9 through the 13, on the CWU campus. All events are free and open to the public. Below is a list of presentations.</p><p>Monday, September 9, 7:00-8:00 p.m.<br><strong>Electricity, Magnetism, and a Little Bit of Peril</strong><br>Lind 215<br>Presented by the Department of Physics. Watch and discuss physics demonstrations related to electricity and magnetism, with a few demonstrations that you may think are a little bit dangerous . . . for the presenters.&nbsp;<br>Audience: All ages.</p><p>Tuesday, September 10, 6:00-7:00 p.m.<br><strong>The Everyday Science of Learning: How to Use Critical Thinking for Lifelong Success</strong><br>Science 101<br>Presented by Ian Quitadamo, professor, Biology and Science Education.<br>Audience: Ages 13 and up</p><p>Wednesday, September 11, 7:00-8:00 p.m.<br><strong>Forests, Fires and Climate Change: Understanding the Dynamic Landscapes of the Pacific Northwest</strong><br>Dean 106<br>Presented by Megan Walsh, professor, Geography.<br>Audience: Ages 13 and up</p><p>Thursday, September 12, 7:00-8:00 p.m.<br><strong>Learn About the Wonderful Geology of Washington!</strong><br>Lind 215<br>Presented by Nick Zentner, senior lecturer, Geological Sciences.&nbsp;<br>Audience: All ages</p><p>Friday, September 13. 6:00-7:00 p.m.<br><strong>The Chemistry Show</strong><br>Science 101<br>This chemistry show showcases chemical reactions that cause color changes, flashes, and explosions. The Department of Chemistry presenters will also discuss chemistry that you experience everyday but don't necessarily notice.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br>Audience: Ages 5 and up</p><p>For more information, go to www.cwu/cesme</p><br><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>September 4, 2013</p>CWU Alumnus Named National Teacher of the Yearhttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/node/2494Mon, 22 Apr 2013 08:41:52<p><img alt="" src="/science-education/sites/cts.cwu.edu.science-education/files/images/charbonneauclass2.jpg" style="width: 480px; height: 320px; "></p><p>Jeff Charbonneau, a 2000 CWU alumnus and an Eastern Washington science teacher today was named national Teacher of the Year.&nbsp;</p><p>Read the Wall Street Journal article <a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130422-907667.html?mod=googlenews_wsj">here</a>.</p><p>Read the Washington Post article <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/04/23/2013-national-teacher-of-year-public-education-not-in-crisis/">here</a>.</p><p>Charbonneau, from Zillah High in the Yakima Valley, is the first winner from Washington state since 2007, and he will spend a year traveling as an ambassador for the teaching profession.</p><p>The Council of Chief State School Officers announced the award today. Charbonneau, the 63rd National Teacher of the Year, will be recognized along with all 2013 State Teachers of the Year by President Obama in a ceremony at the White House on Tuesday.</p><p>Charbonneau was one of four finalists for the teaching honor. The other three finalists were an English teacher from Maryland, a special education teacher from Florida and a music teacher from New Hampshire.</p><p>Read more about Charbonneau <a href="http://blogs.seattletimes.com/today/2013/04/eastern-washington-teacher-named-national-teacher-of-the-year/">here</a>.</p><p><br>Charbonneau is a 2000 CWU graduate in biology education, who also received his biology teaching certificate, in 2000; and his broad area science teaching certificate, in 2004, from CWU. In 2005, he earned his Master Teacher degree from Central.</p><p>In addition, Charbonneau teaches online professional teacher certification courses and facilities the online National Board Teacher Certification candidate program through the CWU Office of Continuing Education. He also is a teacher in CWU's Cornerstone program, which allow his high school physics students to earn college credit.</p><p><br>Photo courtesy of David Goehner, ESD 105</p>CWU Professor First in Washington to Receive AAAS Science Prizehttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/node/2491Mon, 02 Jul 2012 11:40:10<p>By Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, CWU Public Affairs</p><p><strong>ELLENSBURG, Wash.</strong> — Anne Egger, professor of geological sciences and science education at Central Washington University is the first Washington scientist to receive the <em>Science</em> Prize for Inquiry-Based Instruction (IBI). <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org"><em>Science</em></a>, the journal of the <a href="http://www.aaas.org/">American Association for the Advancement of Science</a> (AAAS), has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of one million. Egger’s essay, “<a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/10.1126/science.1214293">Engaging Students in Earthquakes via Real-Time Data and Decisions</a>,” will be published in the June 29 issue.</p><p>Read the whole article <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/cwu-professor-first-washington-receive-aaas-science-prize">here</a>.</p>CWU professor Martha Kurtz trades college classroom for high schoolhttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/node/2490Mon, 18 Jun 2012 09:23:41<p>By BARB OWENS staff writer, DAILY RECORD newspaper</p><p>Martha Kurtz, professor and chairwoman of Central Washington University’s science education department, traded her college classroom for high school classrooms throughout Central Washington during a sabbatical this past school year.</p><div id="blox-story-text"><div id="paging_container"><div><p>Her research, supported by the Educational Service Districts in the Wenatchee and Yakima areas, focuses on teaching and learning in secondary science classrooms. Kurtz’ data will help the ESDs better plan professional development opportunities for teachers and help teachers be more strategic about professional development.</p><p>Read more <a href="http://www.dailyrecordnews.com/news/cwu-professor-martha-kurtz-trades-college-classroom-for-high-school/article_582d6cd2-b570-11e1-b8df-0019bb2963f4.html" target="_blank">here</a>.</p></div></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p>KIMA TV Interviewhttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/node/2468Tue, 15 May 2012 13:30:30<p>The newest addition to the Science Education team, Anne Egger, was interviewed by KIMA TV August 22, 2011. "The university will receive part of a 10 million dollar grant to help support the Geo-sciences." To read the article and watch the video, click<a href="http://www.kimatv.com/news/local/128219418.html?"> HERE.</a></p>CWU Robert Noyce SMART Programhttp://www.cwu.edu/science-education/node/2467Tue, 15 May 2012 13:29:55<p><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; display: inline !important; float: none; ">The CWU Robert Noyce SMART Program is a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded program to encourage talented science and mathematics students and professionals to pursue teaching careers. To learn more and to apply, click<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></span><a href="http://www.cwu.edu/cesme/cwu-robert-noyce-smart-program" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><b>HERE</b></a><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; display: inline !important; float: none; "><span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span>or click the Noyce SMART Scholar link in the left side bar.</span></p>