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Registrar

2002 - 2003 Physical Education, Health Education and Leisure Services

Faculty
Chair: Robert McGowan
Physical Education Building 107

Professors:
Kenneth Briggs, Health Education - Pedagogy, Wellness, Substance Abuse
Gary Frederick, Physical Education - Administration
Stephen C. Jefferies, Physical Education - Pedagogy
Vincent Nethery, Exercise Science
John Pearson, Physical Education - Pedagogy, Administration
Dorothy Purser, Physical Education - Paramedics
William Vance, Recreation Management

Associate Professors:
Walter Arlt, Physical Education - Computer Application
Leo D'Acquisto, Exercise Science, Biomechanics
Robert Gregson, Physical Education - Pedagogy
Andrew Jenkins, Health Education - Community Health, Health Promotion
Barbara Masberg, Recreation and Tourism Management
Kirk E. Mathias, Physical Education, Pedagogy
Lana Jo Sharpe, Physical Education - Dance

Assistant Professors:
Carolyn Booth, Physical Education - Paramedics
Tim Burnham, Exercise Science
Dorothy Chase, Recreation and Tourism Management
Melody Madlem, Health Education
Wendy Mustain, Physical Education - Pedagogy

General Departmental Information

The Department of Physical Education, Health Education and Leisure Services has many programs which lead to the Bachelor of Science degree. In addition to professional preparation in exercise science, health, physical education, paramedic studies and recreation and tourism management, the Department also encourages students to develop skills in physical activities that will enable them to promote their personal fitness, maintain health, build morale, and establish an interest in future recreational activities.

Students majoring in Physical Education, Health Education and Leisure Services can prepare themselves for a variety of career possibilities.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Bachelor of Science

Physical Education (6100)

Physical Education: Teaching K-12 Major (6101)

Health Fitness Endorsement

This major (6101) satisfies the Primary endorsement for Health/Fitness.

Program Director: Stephen C. Jefferies

Admission Requirements:

Admission to a Physical Education major is selective. Students wishing to apply for admission must meet these requirements:

1. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the following courses: PE 245, PE 250, and PE 280.

2. A 500-word typed essay outlining your teaching philosophy. This should include reasons for choosing the major, your background and qualifications, the contribution you believe you can make to the physical education teaching profession, and your intended goals upon completion of the major.

3. Passing the reading, comprehension, and sentence skills section of the Sophomore-Junior Assessment test administered by the Testing Office in Bouillon Hall.

Prior to completing these classes, students may be admitted as pre-majors. Students may not take additional PE Major classes until they have been fully admitted into the major except by permission from their advisor. All students are required to meet with their advisor each quarter.

The teaching major (6101) qualifies students for teaching, supervising and coordinating physical education in K-12  public schools. Students taking this major are required to complete the professional education program requirements offered through the Curriculum and Supervision department.

Students may also graduate with a non-teaching B.S. degree in Physical Education (6100). See the Physical Education Program web site for more information:

http://www.cwu.edu/~pehls/pe.htm.

For the major application procedure, contact the Physical Education Program Director.

Required Courses                            Credits

PE 245, First Aid                                    3
PE 280, Professional Foundations                     3
PE 340.1, Practicum I                                1
PE 340.2, Practicum II                               2
PE 340.3, Practicum III                              2
PE 340.4, Practicum IV                               3
PE 341.1, Pedagogical Foundations of PE I            3
PE 341.2, Pedagogical Foundations of PE II           3
PE 341.3, Pedagogical Foundations of PE III          3
PE 342.1, Movement Analysis I                        4
PE 342.2, Movement Analysis II                       4
PE 342.3, Movement Analysis III                      6
PE 342.4, Movement Analysis IV                       4
PE 250, Anatomical Kinesiology                       5
PE 351, Scientific Foundations of Health & Fitness   5
PE 463, Pediatric Issues in Exercise Science         5
HED 101, Health Essentials                           4
HED 210, Drugs and Health                            3
HED 230, Foundations of Health Education             3
HED 324, Noninfectious Disease                       4
HED 345, School Health Curriculum Materials          3
HED 422, Methods for Health Promotion                4
HED 445, Health Education Professionalism            1

                                          Total     78

Bachelor of Science

Exercise Science Major (3290)

Program Director: Vincent M. Nethery, Ph.D.

Advisors:
Dr. Leo D'Acquisto
Dr. Tim Burnham

The Exercise Science major prepares students to meet the theoretical and practical requirements necessary to evaluate and plan exercise programs for diverse populations, and to pursue certifications necessary for entry into, and advancement within, various health and fitness employment settings. Exercise Science major graduates work  in adult and corporate fitness programs of business, industry, public agencies, and schools. In addition, there are also career opportunities in sectors including; fitness clubs, cardiac rehabilitation programs, wellness centers, obesity clinics, and physical/occupational therapy clinics.

Admission Requirements:

Admission to the Fitness and Sport Management major is selective. Students wishing to attain full admission must meet the following requirement: Successful completion of the following courses: PE 245, PE 250, PE 254.

Students must be admitted to the Exercise Science major prior to enrolling in 300 or above level courses in the Exercise Science major. Students must receive a grade of C (2.0) or better in all major courses.

For the major application procedure, contact the Exercise Science program director.

Required Courses                       Credits

IT 101, Computer Applications                        3
FCSN 245, Basic Nutrition                            5
PE 245, First Aid                                    3
PE 250, Anatomical Kinesiology                       5
PE 254, Foundations of Fitness                       3
HED 324, Noninfectious Disease                       4
PE 348, Prevention and Treatment of Athletic 
  Injuries                                           4
PE 351, Scientific Foundations of Health and Fitness 5
COM 345, Business and Professional Speaking  OR
  COM 250, Public Speaking: Practice and Criticism   4
PE 450, Physiology of Exercise                       5
PE 318, Aerobic Fitness                              3
PE 360, Principles of Strength Training              4
PE 446, Nutrition, Weight Control and Exercise       3
PE 455, Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription 5
PE 456, Administration of Programs for 
  Special Populations                                4
PE 457, Exercise Adherence Strategies                3
PE 464, Management of Fitness Facilities 
  and Programs                                       4
PE 461, Current Issues in Fitness and 
  Exercixe Science                                   2
PE 495, Practicum 495.1, 495.2, or 495.2             2
PE 495.4, Fitness Assessment Laboratory              2
PE 490, Internship                               10-12

                                          Total     85

Bachelor of Science

Paramedic Major (6020)
Program Director: Dorothy Purser

The Paramedic major is designed for students who plan to become professionals in emergency services.

The curriculum includes classroom lectures, group discussions, laboratory demonstrations, clinical experience, observations and practice, simulated operational exercise and on-the-job training with an advanced ambulance service all of which will fully prepare the student for occupations related to advanced emergency medical services. This major is not for students interested in medics, medex or physicians assistant programs.

All applicants must meet entrance criteria (EMT certification and experience) and be approved by the paramedic screening committee before being admitted into the program. AA degree or two years college experience recommended.

Completion of the major listed below and other degree requirements leads to the Bachelor of Science Paramedic major and eligibility to take the national examination for paramedic certification.

Required Courses                       Credits

PE 245, First Aid                                    3
PE 250.1, Human Anatomy Laboratory                   1
PE 319, Emergency Medical Technician                 5
PE 335, Introduction to Paramedic Training           3
PE 336, Paramedic Clinical Training I                3
PE 337, Paramedic Clinical Training II               3
PE 345, Instructor's First Aid                       3
PE 440, Medical Measurements and Terminology         2
PE 441, General Pharmacology for Paramedics          3
PE 443, Myocardial Disease and Arrhythmia Diagnosis  3
PE 444, Principles and Therapeutics of Advanced
  Life Support                                       3
PE 451, Trauma For Advanced Life Support             3
PE 459, Emergencies in Pediatric/Geriatric Care      3
PE 493, Practicum in Paramedic Training             12
BIOL 355, Anatomy/Physiology I                       5
BIOL 356, Anatomy/Physiology II                      5

                                          Total     60

Physical Education Minors

For minor application procedure, contact the Physical Education Program Director.

Athletic Training Minor (1555)

Required Courses                       Credits

HED 101, Health Essentials                           3
FCSN  245, Basic Nutrition                           5
PE 245, First Aid                                    3
PE 250, Anatomical Kinesiology                       5
PE 319, Emergency Medical Technician                 5
PE 348, Prevention and Treatment of Athletic 
  Injuries                                           4
PE 351, Scientific Foundations of Health & Fitness   5
PE 450, Physiology of Exercise                       5
PE 452, Assessment of Athletic Injuries              3

                                          Total     38

Dance Minor (2185)
Program Director: Lana Jo Sharpe

This minor is designed to broaden academic and technical background for teaching and directing dance activities in a variety of settings.

Requirement: Minimum of one year active membership in Orchesis.

Required Courses                       Credits

PED 116, Beginning Folk Dance                        1
PED 118, Beginning Ballroom Dance                    1
PE 161, Cultural History of Dance                    4
PE 201.1, Modern Dance I                             2
PE 201.2, Modern Dance II                            2
PE 202.1, Ballet I                                   2
PE 211, Music for Dance-Rhythms and Resources        2
PE 302, Dance Production                             3
PE 309, Teaching Methods: Recreational Dance         3
PE 314, Dance for Children                           3
Department approved electives                        4

                                          Total     27

Dance: Teaching Minor (2190)
Program Director: Lana Jo Sharpe

Requirement: Minimum of one year active membership in Orchesis.

This minor satisfies the Supporting endorsement for Dance.

Required Courses                       Credits

PE 161, Cultural History of Dance                    4
PE 201.1, Modern Dance I                             2
PE 201.2, Modern Dance II                            2
PE 202.1, Ballet I                                   2
PE 211, Music for Dance�Rhythms & Recources          2
PE 250, Anatomy Kinesiology                          5
PE 301, Choreography                                 3
PE 302, Dance Production                             3
PE 309, Teaching Methods: Recreational Dance         3
PE 314, Dance for Children                           3
PE 315, Teaching Methods: Modern Dance 
  and Ballet (3) or
PE 303, Teaching Methods: Basic Skills (3)           3
PED 116, Beginning Folk Dance                        1
PED 118, Beginning Ballroom Dance                    1

                       Total Endorsement Credits    34

Coaching Minor (1950)

Students are recommended to obtain state teaching certification for permanent employment coaching position opportunities.

The Coaching Minor course of study at Central Washington University meets the standards of the Washington Interscholastic Athletic Association regarding recommended standards for employment at the preferred Coach Level. Requirements (Item 23.4.1, W.I.A.A. Handbook) for all levels listed below.

These levels are:
Beginning Coach
Experienced Coach
Preferred Coach

Students selecting this minor must complete PE 351 as a prerequisite to PE 450. This course of study qualifies the student to be certified by the W.I.A.A. at the preferred coaching level.

Required Physical Education Courses       Credits

PE 245, First Aid                                    3
PE 250, Anatomical Kinesiology                       5
PE 340.2, Practicum II                               2
PE 341.1, Pedagogical Found. PE I                    3
PE 346, Administration of Athletics                  3
PE 348, Prevention and Treatment of Athletic
  Injuries                                           4
PE 351, Scientific Foundations of Health & Fitness   5
PE 453, Psychology and Social Found. Coaching        3
                                                   (28)
Required Health Education Classes

HED 205, Drugs and Sports                            2
                                                    (2)
Elective Credits (Total of 6 credits)

Two field work experiences or two classes from the following selection or a combination of both.

PE 321, Football Coaching                            3
PE 322, Wrestling Coaching                           3
PE 323, Basketball Coaching                          3
PE 324, Track Coaching                               3
PE 325, Baseball Coaching                            3
PE 329, Tennis Coaching                              3
PE 330, Volleyball Coaching                          3
PE 333, Swimming Coaching                            3
PE 442, Field Work in Physical Education             3
PE 521, Advanced Football Coaching                   3
PE 523, Advanced Basketball Coaching                 3
PE 524, Advanced Track Coaching                      3
PE 525, Advanced Baseball Coaching                   3
                                             (6)
                                        Total       36

Exercise Science Minor (3290)

Required Courses                                 Credits

PE 250, Anatomical Kinesiology                       5
PE 254, Foundations of Fitness                       3
PE 351, Scientific Foundations of Health and Fitness 5
PE 450, Physiology of Exercise                       5
PE 455, Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription 5
Select from one of the following:          
PE 360, Scientific Principles of Strength Training   4
PE 456, Administration of Programs for               4
        Special Populations                                
PE 457, Exercise Adherence Strategies                3


                                        Total     26-27

Physical Education Courses


Program Director: Debra D'Acquisto, M.A.

The purpose of the Physical Education Activity Program is to offer students an instructional program that utilizes physical movement as the primary educational medium. This program provides opportunities for students to develop and improve physical skills. In addition, students learn rules, terminology, proper technique and safety issues specific to each particular activity.

Some of the courses meet off-site.
Some of the following courses have minimal additional fees.
Check the current class schedule for specific dates and fees.

Fitness Activities Courses

One credit (meets twice weekly)

PEF 110. Conditioning Exercises.

PEF 111. Intermediate Conditioning Exercises. Prerequisite, PEF 110 or permission.

PEF 112. Ski Conditioning.

PEF 113. Weight Training.

PEF 114. Intermediate Weight Training. Prerequisite, PEF 113 or permission.

PEF 115. Jogging.

PEF 116. Aquacises. Designed to increase the physical fitness of individuals through water exercises. Open to both swimmers and non-swimmers.

PEF 118. Military Conditioning. Physical conditioning activities designed to prepare the Army ROTC Advanced Course student for Advanced Camp and Air Force ROTC student for Field Training. For Army ROTC Advanced Course and Air Force ROTC students only.

PEF 119. Advanced Military Conditioning. Prerequisites, PEF 118 and instructor permission, meets three times weekly.

PEF 121. Step Aerobics.

PEF 122. Dance Aerobics.

PEF 123. Aerobic Walking. Assessment of present level of cardiorespiratory fitness and prescription of an individualized aerobic walking exercise program for increasing and maintaining fitness.

PEF 124. Distance Running.

PEF 125. Athletic Performance Conditioning. By permission, class restricted to athletes.

PEF 126. Kick/Box Aerobics. Safe, effective aerobic work-out mimicking basic self-defense, and boxing movements.

PEF 130. Triathlon Training.

PEF 198. Special Topics.

Team Sports Courses

One credit (meets twice weekly)

PETS 110. Basketball.

PETS 113. Soccer.

PETS 114. Softball (Slow Pitch.)

PETS 115. Touch Football.

PETS 116. Volleyball.

PETS 117. Advanced Volleyball. Prerequisite, PETS 116 or permission.

PETS 118. Rugby.

PETS 119. Competitive Volleyball. Permission of instructor. Grade will be S or U.

PETS 198. Special Topics.

Dance Courses

One credit (meets twice weekly)

PED 112. Orchesis Performing Dancers. May be repeated for credit.

PED 113. Beginning Jazz Dance.

PED 114. Advanced Jazz Dance. Prerequisite, PED 113 or permission.

PED 115. Tap Dance.

PED 116. Beginning Folk Dance. Traditional recreational dances of various countries.

PED 118. Beginning Ballroom Dance.

PED 119. Advanced Ballroom Dance. Prerequisite, PED 118 or permission.

PED 122. Tap Dance II. Prerequisite, PED 115 or permission.

PED 125. Theatre Dance . Theatre Dance Skills and combinations.

PED 130. Beginning Yoga. May be repeated for credit.

PED 131. Yoga Level II. Prerequisite, PED 130, Beginning Yoga.This class will review & refine techniques learned in the beginning yoga calss, as well as further discussion and practice of yoga postures and other topics related to yoga.

PED 198. Special Topics.

Aquatics Courses

One credit (meets twice weekly)

PEAQ 110. Springboard Diving.

PEAQ 111. Beginning Swimming.

PEAQ 112. Intermediate Swimming. Prerequisite, be able to swim 25 yds. and know 3 strokes.

PEAQ 113. Advanced Swimming. Prerequisite, be able to swim 200 yds continuously, instruction on refining strokes.

PEAQ 114. Swim Conditioning. Planned workout with no emphasis on stroke instruction.

PEAQ 116. Water Polo. Prerequisite, must be an intermediate swimmer.

PEAQ 198. Special Topics.

Individual and Dual Sports Courses

One credit (meets twice weekly)

PEID 110. Beginning Badminton.

PEID 113. Beginning Bowling.

PEID 114. Intermediate Bowling. Prerequisite, PEID 113 or permission.

PEID 115. Beginning Golf.

PEID 116. Intermediate Golf. Prerequisite, PEID 115 or permission.

PEID 117. Advanced Golf.

PEID 120. Beginning Fencing.

PEID 121. Intermediate Fencing.

PEID 122. Advanced Fencing.

PEID 123. Beginning Tennis.

PEID 124. Intermediate Tennis. Prerequisite, PEID 123 or permission.

PEID 125. Advanced Tennis. Prerequisite, PEID 124 or permission.

PEID 128. Beginning Skiing.

PEID 129. Intermediate Skiing. Prerequisite, PEID 128 or permission.

PEID 130. Cross Country Skiing.

PEID 131. Showshoeing.

PEID 133. Backpacking.

PEID 134. Bicycling.

PEID 136. Pickleball/Racquetball.

PEID 137. Hiking and Orienteering.

PEID 138. Karate.

PEID 139. Intermediate Karate. Prerequisite, PEID 138, or permission.

PEID 140. Fly Fishing.

PEID 145. Beginning Circus Arts. Introduction to juggling, unicycling and similar skills involving balance and coordination.

PEID 146. Intermediate Circus Arts. Development of juggling, unicycling and similar skills involving balance and coordination.

PEID 198. Special Topics.

Gymnastics and Tumbling Courses

One credit (meets twice weekly)

PEGT 110. Beginning Gymnastics.

PEGT 112. Beginning Tumbling.

PEGT 113. Intermediate Tumbling. Prerequisite, PEGT 112 or permission.

PEGT 198. Special Topics.

Varsity Sports for Men

One credit (two or three hours activity per day plus all regularly scheduled meetings and game sessions). May be repeated for credit.

PEVM 110. Baseball.

PEVM 111. Basketball.

PEVM 112. Cross Country.

PEVM 113. Football.

PEVM 114. Golf.

PEVM 115. Swimming.

PEVM 116. Tennis.

PEVM 117. Track and Field.

PEVM 118. Wrestling.

PEVM 120. Cheerleading.

Varsity Sports for Women

One credit (two or three hours activity per day plus all regularly scheduled meetings and game sessions). May be repeated for credit.

PEVW 110. Basketball.

PEVW 111. Cross Country.

PEVW 114. Swimming.

PEVW 115. Tennis.

PEVW 116. Track and Field.

PEVW 117. Volleyball.

PEVW 118. Soccer.

PEVW 119. Softball.

PEVW 120. Cheerleading.

Physical Education Courses

PE 161. Cultural History of Dance (4). A survey course in the evolution of dance through the ages with emphasis on the major forces which have influenced dance in the 20th Century.

PE 201.1. Modern Dance I (2). Basic modern dance techniques and beginning composition. One hour lecture; two hours laboratory per week.

PE 201.2. Modern Dance II (2). Four hours of intermediate modern dance theory and technique. Experience in solo and group compositions.

PE 201.3. Modern Dance III (2). Prerequisite, PE 201.2. Four hours of advanced modern dance theory and techniques. Emphasis on performance and solo composition. Experience in organizing and presenting programs.

PE 202.1. Ballet I (2). Beginning technique in classical ballet, including barre, center work and enchainments (center combinations).

PE 202.2. Ballet II (2). Prerequisite, PE 202.1. Intermediate technique in classical ballet including barre, center work and enchainments (center combinations).

PE 202.3. Ballet III (2). Prerequisite, PE 202.2. Advanced technique in classical ballet including barre, center work and enchainments (center combinations).

PE 211. Music for Dance-Rhythms and Resources (2). Prerequisites, PE 201.1. A study of rhythmic concepts as related to dance movements and composition; an introduction to music resources emphasizing composer/choreographer collaborations.

PE 220. Life Saving (2). Prerequisite, Intermediate swimming or permission of instructor. A senior life saving certificate will be awarded upon completion of course. One hour lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 221. Lifeguard Training (3) Prerequisites, PEAQ 113 or permission and First Aid and CPR certificate. American Red Cross approved course for which certification may be granted. The course will include rescue technique, preventative lifeguarding and conditioning. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 222. Lifeguard Training Instructor (2). Prerequisites, PE 221 and current American Red Cross lifeguard training certificate. Certify students to teach the American Red Cross Basic Water Safety course, Emergency Water Safety course, lifeguard training and lifeguard training review. One hour lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 245. First Aid (3). American Red Cross First Aid Course for which standard certificate may be granted.

PE 250. Anatomical Kinesiology (5). Study of the skeletal and muscular systems, the fundamentals of biomechanics, and their applications to human movement, skill development and skill performance.

PE 250.1. Human Anatomy Laboratory (1). Prerequisite, PE 250 or may be taken concurrently, or permission of instructor. Laboratory experience in human anatomy. Two hours per week.

PE 254. Foundations of Fitness (3). Overview of the Fitness Industry, components of fitness and strategies to improve the health and well-being of the individual. Formerly PE 354.

PE 280. Professional Foundations of Physical Education (3). Introduction and orientation to the profession.

PE 298. Special Topics (1-6).

PE 300. Teaching Designs in Physical Education (4). Methodology of subject presentation and organization of teaching content. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 301. Choreography (3). Prerequisite, PE 201.1 or instructor's permission. The study and practice of choreographic techniques and tools utilizing creative problem solving. Students will meet for two hours laboratory work each week plus two hours lecture.

PE 302. Dance Production (3). Aspects of organizing and mounting a dance production, including scheduling, programming, publicity, costuming, lighting, and sound design.

PE 303. Basic Skills/Lead-Up Activities (3). Prerequisite, PE 300. The development and practice of basic motor patterns, elementary and complex physical skills, and organized physical activities appropriate for instruction in elementary school physical education. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 304. Teaching Methods: Soccer/Track and Field (3). Prerequisites, PE 300 and PETS 113 or permission. Knowledge of skills and the teaching of soccer and track and field. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 305. Teaching Methods: Racquet Sports (3). Prerequisites, PE 300, PEID 110, PEID 136, and PEID 123 or permission. Knowledge of skills and the teaching of badminton, handball, pickleball, racquetball, and tennis. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 306. Teaching Methods: Basketball/Volleyball (3). Prerequisites, PE 300 PETS 110 and PETS 116 or permission. Knowledge of skills and the teaching of basketball and volleyball. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 307. Teaching Methods: Fitness Activities (3). Prerequisites, PE 300, PEF 113, PEF 110, PEF 121 and PEAQ 111 or permission. Knowledge of skills and the teaching of indoor and outdoor fitness activities. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 308. Teaching Methods: Tumbling/Stunts/Gymnastics (3). Prerequisites, PE 300, PEGT 110 or PEGT 112 or permission. Knowledge of skills and the teaching of tumbling/stunts/gymnastics. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 309. Teaching Methods: Recreational Dance (3). Prerequisite, PED 116 or permission. Knowledge of skills necessary in the teaching of various forms of recreational dance styles. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 313. Alternative Physical Education Activities (3). Prerequisite, PE 300. Non-traditional games and activities taught in public school physical education curriculums. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 314. Dance for Children (3). Strategies for teaching dance in elementary education, including creative dance, rhythmic exploration, use of props, unit plan development, and methods of assessment.

PE 315. Teaching Methods: Modern and Ballet Dance (3). Prerequisites, PE 201.1, 201.2, and 202.1. Teaching methods for Modern and Ballet technique classes which emphasizes the development of critical and creative thinking skills, observation skills, and assessment skills.

PE 318. Aerobic Fitness (3). Prerequisite, PE 250. This class provides the Fitness and Sports Management major with an in-depth exploration of various cardiovascular exercise activities and equipment.

PE 319. Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) (5). Prerequisite, PE 245. Emphasizes the development of student skill in recognition of illness and injuries and proper procedures of emergency care.

PE 320. Water Safety Instructor (3). Prerequisite, intermediate swimmer. Students satisfactorily passing the Red Cross requirements will receive a Red Cross Water Safety Instructors Certificate. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 321. Football Coaching (3).

PE 322. Wrestling Coaching (3).

PE 323. Basketball Coaching (3).

PE 324. Track Coaching (3).

PE 325. Baseball Coaching (3).

PE 329. Tennis Coaching (3).

PE 330. Volleyball Coaching (3).

PE 333. Swimming Coaching (3).

*PE 334. Physical Education Activities for the Elementary School (3). Selection, organization, and presentation of physical education activities in the elementary school.

*Enrollment is subject to being fully admitted to the Teacher Education Program.

PE 335. Introduction to Paramedic Training (2). Prerequisites, PE 319 and permission. Patient care skills, new equipment for patient treatment, medical-legal requirements.

PE 336. Paramedic Clinical Training I (3). Prerequisites, BIOL 356, PE 335 and permission. Intensive training in Asepsis Procedures, CPR, Dog Lab I, IV Team, Morgue, Operating Room, Recovery Room, Respiratory Laboratory, and Shock Treatment.

PE 337. Paramedic Clinical Training II (3). Prerequisites, BIOL 356, PE 336 and permission. Intensive training in Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiology, Dog Lab II, Emergency Room, Endotracheal Suctioning, Medication, Mobile Telemetry, Obstetrics, and Pediatrics.

PE 340.1. PE Teaching Practicum I (1). Prerequisite, pre-major status in PE or permission. Students will observe and assist in PE classes at elementary and secondary levels in a local school for 4 hours/week throughout the quarter.

PE 340.2. PE Teaching Practicum II (2). Prerequisite PE 340.1 or permission. Physical education teaching practicum.

PE 340.3. PE Teaching Practicum III (2). Prerequisite, PE 340.2 or permission. Practicum will consist of two parts: 1) Assist in a PE class in Yakima or Wenatchee for 2 hours/week. 2) Plan and instruct at the Ellensburg 8th grade honor’s camp.

PE 340.4. PE Teaching Practicum IV (3). Prerequisite, PE 340.3 or permission. Physical education teaching practicum.

PE 341.1. Pedagogical Foundations of PE I (3). Prerequisite, PE or Health Education majors only. Examination of selected pedagogical principles and their impact on the teaching of human movement.

PE 341.2. Pedagogical Foundations of PE II (3). Prerequisite, PE 341.1 or permission. Examination of selected pedagogical principles and their impact on the teaching of human movement.

PE 341.3. Pedagogical Foundations of PE III (3). Prerequisite, PE 341.2 or permission. Examination of specific pedagogical principles and their impact on the teaching of human movement.

PE 342.1. Movement Analysis and Application I (4). Prerequisite, PE or Health major or permission. Instruction in the analysis and teaching of locomotor and non-locomotor skills.

PE 342.2. Movement Analysis and Application II (4). Prerequisite, PE 342.1 or permission. Identify critical components in manipulative movements. Examination of propulsive and receptive manipulative movements in a variety of application activities.

PE 342.3. Movement Analysis and Application III (6). Prerequisite, PE 342.2 or permission. Identify critical components of selected outdoor pursuits, challenge activities, team sports and field events.

PE 342.4. Movement analysis and Application IV (4). Prerequisite, PE 342.3 or permission. Identify critical components in striking activities. Examination of striking movements in a variety of application activities.

PE 345. Instructor's First Aid (3). Prerequisite, PE 245 or instructor's permission. American Red Cross First Aid course for instructor's certificate. Meets requirements for ski patrol.

PE 346. Administration of Athletics (3).

PE 347. Advanced First Aid (3). Prerequisite, PE 245. American Red Cross and State Industrial First Aid course for which an advanced certification may be granted.

PE 348. Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (4). Prerequisite, PE 250. Prevention and treatment of injuries and rehabilitation of injured athletes. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 351. Scientific Foundations of Health and Fitness (5). Examination of the digestive, respiratory, urinary, circulatory, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems of the human body. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 352.1. Officiating: Hockey/Volleyball (2)

PE 352.2. Officiating: Basketball (2).

PE 355. Outdoor Pursuits (2). Prerequisite, PE 300. Course is limited to students pursuing the K-12 physical education teaching endorsement. Introduction to planning and instruction of selected outdoor pursuits suitable for inclusion in K-12 PE curriculums.

PE 360. Scientific Principles of Strength Training (4). Prerequisites, PE 250, 250.1, and 356, or permission.This course addresses the scientific and theoretical bases of program design in resistance training.

PE 361. Physical Education for the Handicapped (3). Review of the major physical handicaps; planning the physical education program for these conditions.

PE 362. Dance in Education (4).

PE 398. Special Topics (1-6).

PE 440. Medical Measurements and Terminology (2). Prerequisites, PE 319 and permission of instructor. Specialized medical terminology, medical weights, and measurements. Spelling, pronunciation, and workable definition of commonly used medical words.

PE 441. General Pharmacology for Paramedics (3). Prerequisite, PE 440. Mechanism of action, indications and contraindications of drugs, their side effects, and dosage of administration.

PE 442. Field Work in Physical Education (1-6). Class to be arranged by college supervisor. Grade will be S or U. May be repeated.

PE 443. Myocardial Disease and Arrhythmia Diagnosis (3). Prerequisite, BIOL 356. Study of conduction abnormalities of the heart and rhythm interpretation. Permission only.

PE 444. Principles and Therapeutics of Advanced Life Support (3). Prerequisite, PE 443. Treatment protocols, decision making with cardiac emergencies, Integration of Knowledge and Skills of Previous class content. Procedures involving drugs, defibrillation and oxygen therapy. Permission only.

PE 446. Sports Nutrition and Weight Control (3). Prerequisite, FCSN 245 or permission. Study of interrelationship of factors required for successful weight control; modification of diet, activity, and behavior. Role of dietary factors in health and body function. Same as FCSN 446. Students may not receive credit for both.

PE 447. Physical Education Equipment and Facilities (3). Knowledge relating to purchase and care of equipment; planning of areas and facilities for athletics, recreation and physical education.

PE 448. Ethics in Sports (3). Ethical considerations involved in coaching, playing and administering sports.

PE 449. Past and Current Concepts in Physical Education (3). The historical background of physical education and sport; their roles in society and education.

PE 450. Physiology of Exercise (5). Prerequisite, PE 250, 351 or permission. Acute and chronic responses of the metabolic, muscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, and thermoregulatory systems to physical work. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 451. Trauma for Advanced Life Support (3). Prerequisite, PE 319. Trauma and related topics is a comprehensive course that provides an essential overview of care of the patient who has sustained accidental injury.

PE 452. Assessment of Athletic Injuries (3). Prerequisite, PE 348. A detailed examination of injuries common among athletes.

PE 453. Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Coaching (3). Investigation of factors affecting individual and group behavior in the coaching of interscholastic sports.

PE 454. Motor Learning Theories (3). Theories dealing with factors which affect individual performance and learning differences in relation to human movement and skill learning. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PE 455. Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (5).Concepts and principles of appraising level of fitness, evaluating the results and designing physical fitness/exercise programs. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory.

PE 456. Administration of Programs for Special Populations (4). Prerequisite, PE 455. Philosophy, principles, policies and procedures of fitness administration to special populations.

PE 457. Exercise Adherence Strategies (3). Review of psychological factors involved in the exercise treatment of normal and special populations.

PE 458. Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education (3). The construction and use of tests which are unique to the field of physical education; physical fitness tests, skill tests, knowledge tests, attitude tests and medical tests.

PE 459. Emergencies in Pediatric/Geriatric Care (3). Emergency training in assessing, treating and transporting pediatric/geriatric patients.

PE 461. Current Issues in Fitness and Exercise Science (2). Prerequisites, PE 455 and 456. This seminar course discusses current trends and issues in the fitness and exercise science field.

PE 463. Pediatric Issues in Exercise Science (5). Prerequisites, PE 250, 351. Essential principles of growth, development, and exercise science and the application of these principles to children and youth. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

PE 464. Management of Fitness Facilities and Programs (4). Prerequisites, PE 455 and PE 456. This course covers conventional business management principles and operational guidelines to the unconventional business of health and fitness facilities.

PE 466. Supervision and Evaluation of Program (3).

PE 468. Philosophy and Physical Education (4). Consideration of the significance and meaning of philosophic processes and their relationship to movement and behavior.

PE 471. Philosophy of Elementary School Physical Education (3).

PE 475. Racism in Sport (3). The study of how racism may manifest itself psychologically, sociologically, and politically in the realm of sport.

PE 481. Organization of Physical Education and Intramurals (3). The nature, processes, and philosophy of physical education and intramural sports.

PE 484. Legal Liability and Risk Management (3). Aspects of personnel law and premises liability in public, private and "not for profit" education, human and social services organizations. Procedures for managing risks. Open to Leisure Services and Physical Education majors, and P.E.H.L.S. graduate students only. Same as RT 484, formerly PE 460. Students may not receive credit for more than one.

PE 485. Physical Growth and Motor Development (3). Prerequisites, PE 450 and PE 454. Study of patterns of physical growth and motor development that affect the learning and performance of physical skills from birth through senescence.

PE 490. Cooperative Education (1-12). Prerequisites: 1) satisfactory completion of practica; 2) a minimum GPA of 2.7 in the major. An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, medical or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Prior approval required. May be repeated. Grade will be S or U.

PE 491. Workshop Clinic (1-6). Letter grades or S or U grades may be given at the option of the Physical Education Department.

PE 492. Practicum (1-4). Prerequisite, permission of elementary physical education advisor. Practical experience working with children in physical education activities. May be repeated for credit. Four credits required in major.

PE 493. Practicum in Paramedic Training (3-12). Prerequisites, PE 444 and permission of instructor. Experience in the following: hospital, ambulance, emergency room, ICU/CCU. Paramedic majors must complete 12 credits. Grade will be
S or U.

PE 495.1. Practicum in Fitness Centers/Clubs (2). Prerequisite, PE 455. Observation of and assistance in fitness programs. Grade will be S or U.

PE 495.2. Practicum in Fitness: Cardiac Rehabilitation (2). Prerequisite, PE 455. Observation, monitoring and supervised leadership of fitness activity applied to physician referred adults. Grade will be S or U.

PE 495.3. Practicum in Fitness: Geriatric Fitness (2). Prerequisite, PE 455. Observation, monitoring, and supervised leadership of fitness programs applied to the elderly. Grade will be S or U.

PE 495.4. Practicum in Fitness: Laboratory Assessment (2). Prerequisite, PE 455. Practical application of testing procedures in cardiovascular fitness, body composition, muscular fitness and flexibility. Grade will be S or U.

PE 496. Individual Study (1-6). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. May be repeated.

PE 498. Special Topics (1-6).

PE 499. Seminar (1-5). May be repeated.

HEALTH EDUCATION

Program Director: Kenneth A. Briggs
Advisors: Dr. Andrew Jenkins, Dr. Melody Madlem, Mr. Mark Perez

General Program Information

Health Education is a field of interest, a discipline, and a profession. As a profession, Health Education is one of the most meaningful and important careers available to college students today. Our ability to be healthy as individuals, families, and as a community is dependent on health education and health educators. Central's Health Education Programs are recognized throughout the state as the premier provider of health education graduates who are needed to fill the multitude of jobs available in the profession.

Students can choose to major in the following:

  1. Bachelor of Science in Community Health with a specialization in Community Health Education.
  2. Bachelor of Arts in School Health Education.

Students interested in majoring in Health Education should make an appointment with a Health Education major advisor to learn more about the major and obtain an application packet. The major advisors are:

  1. School Health Education-Dr. Briggs (509-963-1972)
  2. Community Health CWU main campus-Dr. Jenkins (509-963-1041) or Dr. Madlem (509-963-1971)

Prior Learning Experience Credit For Alcohol and Drug Studies Certification

Students admitted to the Community Health/Chemical Dependency Program may earn up to 15 credits for courses taken during their alcohol and drug studies certification.

In all cases students must provide evidence that the appropriate course work has been satisfactorily completed and that certification has been granted prior to receiving credits.

Bachelor of Science

Community Health Major (2020)

Community Health Education Specialization (2026)

The Community Health Education specialization is a dynamic and diverse program that offers a great deal of employment options. Employing agencies include, but are not limited to: governmental health departments, hospitals, clinics, non-profit health agencies, voluntary health agencies, international health programs, corporations, consulting firms, youth or school based health programs, wellness clubs/clinics, and health care delivery programs.

Admission to the Community Health Program at Central Washington University is selective. Students wishing to make application must meet the following requirements:

A. An overall cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher, or a major GPA of 2.7 in any and all Health Education courses taken before the time of application to the major.
B. Completion of HED 230 Foundations of Health Education with a letter grade of C or higher.
C. Completion of a 500-word letter of intent addressed to the Community Health Education Faculty. The letter should describe a) the student's reasons for choosing the major, b) the student's philosophy of health education, c) the student's specific qualifications for study in this area, and d) the student's intended career goal. The letter will be evaluated based on content, depth, and composition. This letter will also serve as a demonstration of the student's writing skill and entry-level professionalism.
D. Transcripts or CAPS Report of all college courses taken to date at all colleges and universities including Central Washington University.
E. A completed Health Education Major Application Form.

HED 230 must be taken prior to HED 422. HED 230 and HED 410 must be taken prior to HED 475, and HED 230 and HED 422(pre/corequisite) must be taken prior to HED 460.

Required Courses                       Credits

HED 209, Consumer Health                             3
HED 210, Drugs and Health                            3
HED 230, Foundations of Health Education             3
HED 323, Infectious Disease                          3
HED 324, Noninfectious Disease                       4
HED 330, Health Assessment                           4
HED 340, Technological Applications in Health 
         Education                                   3
HED 370, Current Trends in Health Education          3
HED 387, Principles of Fitness and Stress Management 3
HED 410, Community Health                            3
HED 422, Methods for Health Promotion                4
HED 440, Social Marketing of Health Ed. Programs     3
HED 445, Health Education Professionalism            1
HED 460, Controversial Issues in Health Education    3
HED 471, Program Planning I                          5
HED 472, Program Planning II                         5
HED 475, Health Administration                       3
HED 490, Cooperative Education Field Experience     10
COM 345, Business and Professional Speaking          4
FCSN 245, Basic Nutrition                            5
FCSF 231, Human Sexuality                            4
Department approved electives                        9

                                          Total     88

Community Health Education Minor (2025)

Required Courses                               Credits

HED 230, Foundations of Health Education             3
HED 323, Infectious Disease                          3
HED 324, Noninfectious Disease                       4
HED 410, Community Health                            3
HED 422, Methods for Health Promotion                4
HED 460, Controversial Issues in Health Education    3
HED 471, Program Planning I                          5
HED 472, Program Planning II                         5

                                          Total     30

Bachelor of Arts

School Health Education Major (7025)

Health/Fitness Endorsement

This major satisfies the Primary endorsement for Health/Fitness.

"You can't educate a child who isn't healthy and you can't keep a child healthy who isn't educated." Anonymous

The School Health Education major is a lively and dynamic major that will prepare you to teach health in the secondary schools. Additionally, with the inclusion of required physical education courses, students will acquire a state certified primary endorsement in Health/Fitness that will also prepare you to teach K-12 physical education in the schools.

"No one should teach who is not a little bit awed by the importance of the profession." Anonymous

Application Requirements and Procedure

1. Completion of a letter of intent addressed to the Health Education Faculty. The letter should describe the following:
a) Your reasons for choosing School Health Education as a major resulting in a Health/Fitness
Primary Endorsement
b) Your specific experience or qualifications related to the major or minor.

2. Submit this letter with the appropriate application form which you can obtain in the Health Education Office in the Physical Education and Health Building.

As a School Health Education major you also need to make application for admission to the Teacher Education Program during your sophomore or junior year. Application packets are located in Black Hall 228. Remember you must have a minimum 2.8 grade point average over your last 45 credits for conditional acceptance. Students taking this major are required to complete the professional education program requirements offered through the Curriculum and Supervision Department. 

As teacher education majors, no grade less that a C is allowed for any course in your major (primary endorsement area) or in your teacher education program. Also in order to student teach you must have a 3.0 gpa for the last 45 graded credits or overall accumulative.

Prerequites

Students should keep in mind that HED 230 is the introductory professional preparation course and must be taken prior to HED 345. HED 345 needs to be completed prior to HED 422. HED 422 must be taken one or two quarters.prior to student teaching. HED 445 must be taken the quarter before student teaching.

Required Courses                       Credits

HED 101, Health Essentials                           4
HED 210, Drugs and Health                            3
HED 230, Foundations of Health Education             3
HED 323, Infectious Disease                          3
HED 324, Noninfectious Disease                       4
HED 345, School Health Curriculum and Materials      3
HED 387, Principles of Fitness and Stress Management 3
HED 422, Methods for Health Promotion                4
HED 445. Health Education Professionalism            1
HED 460, Controversial Issues in Health Education    3
PE 245, First Aid                                    3
FCSN 245, Basic Nutrition                            5
FCSF 231, Human Sexuality                            4
PE 351, Scientific Foundations in Health/Fitness     5
PE 280, Professional Foundations in PE               3
PE 340.2, Practicum II                               2
PE 341.1, Pedagogical Foundations in PE I            3
PE 341.2, Pedagogical Foundations in PE II           3
PE 342.1, Movement Analysis I                        4
PE 342.2, Movement Analysis II                       4
PE 342.4, Movement Analysis IV                       4

                                          Total     71

 Health/Fitness: Teaching Minor (3900)

This minor satisfies the Supporting endorsement for Health/Fitness.

The Health/Fitness Supporting Area Endorsement certifies teacher education majors to teach health and/or physical education (health/fitness) in the state of Washington. Please apply for acceptance in the Department of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation and Tourism .

Required Courses                         Credits
PE 340.2, Practicum II                               2
PE 341.1, Pedagogical Foundations in 
  Physical Education I                               3
PE 341.2, Pedagogical Foundations in 
Physical Education II                                3
PE 342.1, Movement Analysis I                        4
PE 342.2, Movement Analysis II                       4
PE 250, Anatomical Kinesiology                       5
HED 101, Health Essentials                           4
HED 210, Drugs and Health                            3
HED 230, Foundations of Health Education             3
HED 345, School Health Curriculum Materials          3
HED 324, Noninfectious Disease                       4
HED 422, Methods for Health Promotion                4

                                   Total     42

Health Education Courses

HED 101. Health Essentials (4). Fundamental patterns and understanding of human interaction with natural and man-made environments intended to help students make informed judgments influencing human health.

HED 205. Drugs and Sport (2). Survey of the potential hazards of recreational, ergogenic and restorative drugs commonly used by athletes.

HED 209. Consumer Health (3). Analysis of health aids, cosmetics, non-prescription drugs, health fads and fallacies. Critical evaluation of advertising and promotional schemes; quackery.

HED 210. Drugs and Health (3). Uses and abuses of drugs. Special emphasis will be on psycho-physiological effects upon human health and responsible drug use.

HED 230. Foundations of Health Education (3). Fundamental theories, paradigms, constructs, history, and experiences necessary for comprehensive understanding of Health Education as a profession and lifestyle.

HED 296. Individual Study (1-6). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. May be repeated.

HED 298. Special Topics (1-6).

HED 299. Seminar (1-5). May be repeated.

HED 305. Alcohol and Alcoholism (3). An examination of our nation's number one drug problem. Multifaceted aspects of causes, treatments, prevention and alternatives are discussed.

HED 315. Positive Health Decisions (3). Develops attitudes of self-help, provides tools which students can use to analyze their own life situations, and their relationships with friends, peers, family members, public health personnel, and others.

HED 321. Health aspects of HIV/AIDS (3).

HED 323. Infectious Disease (3). Prerequisites, PE 351, BIOL 201, or permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for both.

HED 324. Noninfectious Disease (4). Prerequisites, PE 351, BIOL 201, or permission of instructor. Course consists of three hours of course work and two hours of medical terminology lab. Students may not receive credit for both.

HED 325. Chemical Dependency Treatment and Recovery (3). Prerequisite, admission to the Chemical Dependency specialization or permission of the instructor. Examines chemical dependency and practice in treatment and recovery processes.

HED 330. Health Assessment (4). Prerequisite, HED 230 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of evaluating the health or condition of individuals and groups. Formerly HED 430.

HED 336. Dependency Behavior and Drug Education (4). Prerequisite, HED 230 or permission of instructor. Individual and social problems of habituation and addiction. Current information and techniques for drug education in the school and community setting.

HED 340. Technological Applications in Health Education (3). Assist students in utilizing computerized sources of information, methods of instruction, understand technology applied to training, and better use computers for resources for health information. Formerly HED 498.

HED 345. School Health Curriculum/Materials (3). Prerequisites, HED 210 and 230. Examination of existing curricula and teaching materials. Design and development of school health curricula.

HED 349. Wellness Training for Peer Educators (2). Prerequisite: HED 101 or permission of instructor.

HED 350. Issues and Trends in Substance Abuse (3). Prerequisite, admission to the Chemical Dependency Specialization or permission of instructor.

HED 360. Legal and Ethical Issues in Chemical Dependency (3). Prerequisites, admission to the Chemical Dependency specialization. A review of legal and ethical issues related to professional practice.

HED 370. Current Trends in Health and Health Education (3). Contemporary health education topics and issues are explored through classroom and community contacts, visual, web-based, and interactive media.

HED 380. Epidemology (3). Prerequisite, HED 323 or permission of instructor.

HED 387. Principles of Fitness and Stress Management (3). Prerequisites, HED 230 or permission of instructor. The theory and practice of health enhancement through fitness and stress management.

HED 398. Special Topics (1-6).

HED 410. Community Health (3). An overview of contemporary community health programs; problems in community health at the local, national, and international levels.

HED 412. Health Aspects of Aging (3). Prerequisite, HED 101 or permission of instructor. Examination of total health as it relates to the aged and the aging process.

HED 422. Methods for Health Promotion (4). Prerequisites HED 101 and HED 230, or permission of instructor.

HED 436. Chemical Dependency and the Schools (4). Prerequisite, admission to the Chemical Dependency Specialization or permission of the instructor. The course will familiarize the student with programs that provide assistance to chemically dependent students within the school and/or the community.

HED 440. Social Marketing of Health Ed. Programs (3). Social marketing theory and practice, health communication strategies, and basic qualitative research methods applied to social marketing theory.

HED 442. Field Work and Experience in Health Education
(1-15). Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Observation and participation in health programs, and/or HED 101. May be repeated to a maximum of 15 credits.

HED 445. Health Education Professionalism (1). Prerequisites, to be taken the quarter before student teaching or placement in community health internship. Professional ethics, job readiness, and job search in health education.

*HED 446. Health Education Curriculum for Elementary Teachers (3). Examination of available curricula and teaching materials in health education for elementary school teachers. Students must develop an elementary health education curriculum.

*Enrollment is subject to being fully admitted to the
Teacher Education Program.

HED 460. Controversial Issues in Health Education (3). Prerequisite, HED 230, Co-Prerequisite, HED 422. Current and controversial issues confronting school and community health education.

HED 471. Program Planning I (5). Prerequisite, HED 230. Health program planning; needs assessment and goal setting. Formerly HED 371. Students may not receive credit for both.

HED 472. Program Planning II (5). Prerequisite, HED 471. Health program planning; implementation and evaluation. Formerly HED 372. Students may not receive credit for both.

HED 475. Community Health Administration (3). Prerequisites, HED 230, 410. Understanding and application of knowledge to various administrative tasks in community health. Grants, management, and personnel issues will be covered.

HED 490. Cooperative Education (1-12). An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Prior approval required. May be repeated. Grade will be S or U.

HED 491. Workshop (1-6). Topics in health education, including work sessions, lectures and demonstrations.

HED 492. Practicum (4). Prerequisite, HED 345 or 472 or permission of instructor. Practical experience and application of responsibilities and competencies necessary for practicing health education.

HED 496. Individual Study (1-6). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. May be repeated.

HED 499. Seminar (1-5). May be repeated.

 

Recreation and Tourism


Program Director: Barbara Masberg

Bachelor of Science
Recreation and Tourism Major (6760)

Recreation and Tourism Program General Information

The Recreation and Tourism Program prepares students for professional positions in a wide variety of government, private, commercial, not-for-profit and other parks, recreation, tourism organizations.

Students choose one of two major areas of specialization: Tourism Management or Recreation Management. Each specialization has both a major program and a minor program. Detailed descriptions of each specialization are provided below.

Tourism Management Specialization (6764)

Advisors: Dr. Barbara Masberg, phone: 509-963-1969 email: masbergb@cwu.edu
and Dr. Dorothy Chase phone: 509-963-1968 email: chasedo@cwu.edu
The student with a specialization in Tourism Management may choose a career 
in a wide variety of travel and tourism related industries including directing 
operations in hotels, resorts, convention centers, cruises, airlines, visitor 
centers, casinos, tour companies, meeting and destination planning businesses, 
and cultural and heritage facilities. The career options within each industry 
are extremely varied and include: management, special event planning, sales and 
marketing, catering or food and beverage coordination, casino games supervision 
and control. 

Admission Requirements: Tourism Management Specialization

Students wishing to apply for admission must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in all 
courses OR a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the first 12 credits of Recreation 
and Tourism coursework. Interested students must complete and submit a major 
application which may be obtained by contacting a tourism management advisor.

Tourism Management Specialization Core Requirements

Required Courses                       Credits

RT 271, Introduction to Tourism Industry             3
RT 275, Career Development                           2
RT 292, Practicum                                    3
RT 325, Promotions in Tourism and Recreation         4
RT 330, Outdoor Recreation                           3
RT 350, Recreation and Tourism for Special Groups    2
RT 373F, Managing Front Office Operations            5
RT 380, Supervision in the Hospitality Industry      3
RT 419, Applied Research                             5
RT 471, Planning and Development of Tourism          3
RT 473, Airline Operations                           3
RT 475, Professionalism in Tourism                   2
RT 480, Recreation and Tourism Administration        3
RT 484, Legal Liability and Risk Management          3
RT 490*, Cooperative Education                      10
IT Applications courses approved by the advisor    3-4
PEID courses, RT 485, Games/Adventure Activities, or
  PE 318, Aerobic Fitness/Approved by advisor        4
ACCT 301, Financial Analysis                         5
Department approved electives**                     20


                                       Total     86-87

*As a part of the course of study, students are required to complete a 3-credit practicum in which they are employed in a tourism operation. Also required is a cooperative education/internship experience in which the student has directed and supervised study under the guidance of a tourism mentor; actually work and learning in a professional setting.

**Electives must be approved by the student's advisor prior to registration for course work.

Recreation Management Specialization (4756)

Advisor: Dr. William Vance

The Recreation Management specialization prepares students for entry level supervisory/managerial positions with government parks and recreation departments, Y.M.C.A.'s and Boys and Girls Clubs, armed forces recreation, university recreation and intramural sports, fitness and racquet clubs, camping and outdoor recreation, and employee recreation services. Emphasis areas include various populations such as children, at-risk youth, the elderly or the disabled and/or program areas such as sports and athletics, outdoor recreation and camp management, social/cultural activities, and many others.

Admission Requirements: Recreation Management Specialization

Admission to the Recreation Management specialization requires a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in at least 45 hours of undergraduate study OR a minimum grade point average of at least 2.5 in the first twelve credits of Recreation Management coursework exclusive of those obtained through experiential learning courses (RT 292 and RT 490 or their equivalents).

Required Courses                                Credits

RT 201, Introduction to Recreation Management        3
RT 221, Community Recreation Leadership              2
RT 292, Practicum                                    6
RT 321, Program Supervision                          4
RT 325, Promotions in Tourism and Recreation         4
RT 350, Recreation and Tourism for Special Groups    2
RT 480, Recreation and Tourism Administration        3
RT 483, Budget and Finance in Recreation Management  2
RT 484, Legal Liability and Risk Management          3
RT 490, Cooperative Education                       12
IT 101, Computer Applications                        3
MGT 380, Organizational Management                   5
HRM 381, Management of Human Resources               5
PE  245, First Aid                                   3
Select from the following                          4-5
	*PSY 205, Psychology of Adjustment (5), OR
        *PSY 314, Human Development and the
                  Learner (4)
	*Population specific psychology/sociology
         courses may be substituted with approval
         of the academic advisor for Recreation Management.
*Advisor approved electives                         24
                                         
                                         Total    85-86

*Electives: The 24 credit elective requirement provides the opportunity for 
each Recreation Management major to select courses beyond the "core" 
requirements through which to develop a more specific career path. Unless 
exceptions are permitted by the student's academic advisor: 

A)The 24-credit elective area will include at least 10 credits of academic 
courses carrying the LES prefix. (Not to include RT 292, Practicum or RT 490, 
Cooperative Education credits); 

B)Both internal (RT) courses and interdisciplinary (non-RT) courses that are 
not a part of the Recreation Management core, and that are to be applied to 
the degree program must be approved by the student's academic advisor.

C)A maximum of 4 RT 292 practicum credits beyond those taken to satisfy the 
Recreation Management core requirement may be applied to the 24 credit elective
area with permission of the student's academic advisor. A maximum of 8 RT 490, 
Cooperative education credits beyond those taken to satisfy the Recreation 
Management core requirement may be applied to the 24-credit elective area 
with permission of the student's academic advisor.

Community Recreation Minor (2050)

Required Courses                        Credits
RT 201, Introduction to Recreation Management        3
RT 221, Community Recreation Leadership              2
RT 292, Practicum                                    4
RT 321, Program Supervision                          4
Electives by Advisement                              7
                                         Total    20

Tourism Management Minor (8480)

Required Courses                       Credits

RT 271, Introduction to Tourism Industry             3
RT 373F, Managing Front Office Operations            5
RT 380, Supervision in the Hospitality Industry      3
RT 475, Professional Development                     2
RT 484, Legal Liability and Risk Management          3
RT 490, Cooperative Education or Practicum
  (Based upon advisement)                            4
Electives by advisement                              8

                                          Total     28

 

Recreation and Tourism Courses

RT 201. Introduction to Recreation Management (3). History, basic philosophy and modern developments for professional application. Emphasis on careers in various recreation and leisure services agencies. Formerly LES 201.

RT 220, Foundations of Leadership (2). Prerequisite, RT 201 or permission of instructor. Overview of theory related to leadership in the recreation tourism profession. Special focus on leadership styles, self-theory, communication and group dynamics as they relate to the development of leisure experiences. Two hours of lecture per week. Formerly LES 220.

RT 221. Community Recreation Leadership (2). Prerequisites, RT 201 or permission of instructor. Basic leadership theories, styles, approaches. Practical leadership exercises to improve skills and abilities. One hour lecture, 2 hours lab, weekly. Formerly LES 221.

RT 271. Introduction to Tourism Industry (3). Presents an overview of travel, tourism and commercial recreation with special emphasis on the various segments of the tourism supply sector. Formerly LES 271.

RT 275. Career Development (2). Prerequisite, RT 271. Students will explore career options and networks within the tourism industry and develop materials for a job search.

RT 292. Practicum (1-3). Prerequisite, permission of advisor. Thirty-five (35) "on-the-job" hours of practical experience per one (1) credit hour earned. Three (3) credits and permission of advisor required for Tourism Management specialization. Six (6) credits, permission of advisor required for Recreation Management specialization. Four (4) additional hours may be applied toward the LES "elective" area. No more than three credits may be earned in the same agency/program. May be repeated for credit. (Formerly LES 242 and LES 292)

RT 296. Individual Study (1-6) . May be repeated. Formerly LES 296.

RT 298. Special Topics (1-6). Formerly LES 298.

RT 299. Seminar (1-5). Formerly LES 299.

RT 302. Leisure and Freedom (3). History, philosophy, and development of leisure, recreation and play. Development of leisure life-styles and patterns. Review of leisure role and influence in life and living. Individualized profile and planning for the future. Formerly LES 302.

RT 309. Planning and Development of Park and Recreation Areas (1-2). Prerequisite, RT 201. Objectives, procedures and techniques for the planning, development and construction of park and recreation facilities. Two field trips required. May be repeated for credit under different titles. Formerly LES 309.

A: Parks, playgrounds and open spaces
B: Athletic and fitness facilities
C: Recreation centers/stadiums/auditoria
D: Camps and outdoor recreation sites

RT 321. Program Supervision (4). Prerequisite, RT 221 or permission. Recreation programming theory and practice. Exercises in organizing, implementing and supervising community recreation activities and services. Formerly LES 321.

RT 325. Promotions in Tourism and Recreation (4). Prerequisite, RT 201, 271 or permission. Practical projects in written, verbal, and visual communications vital to information needs for recreation and tourism. Planning and organizing a promotions program. Formerly LES 325.

RT 330. Outdoor Recreation (3). Prerequisite, permission. Historical antecedents and current issues and practices in the use and management of parks, forests, wilderness areas and other North American outdoor recreation resources. Formerly LES 330.

RT 337. Tour and Interpretive Program Development (3). Methods, techniques and skills used in the planning, development and presentation of resource based interpretive programs and visitor tours. This course will include theoretical understanding of the interpretive process and practice of new skills. Formerly LES 337.

RT 350. Tourism and Recreation for Special Groups (2). Prerequisite, RT 201, 271 or permission. Distinguishing needs of special populations; mentally ill, disabled, aged, and others. Attention to the ADA. Observations of selected population groups. Formerly LES 350. Grade will be S/U.

RT 371. Tourism Essentials (5). Prerequisite, RT 271 or permission of instructor. Travel and tourism, including history, spatial aspects, economics, planning, marketing, research and trends for domestic and international tourism. Formerly LES 371.

RT 373. Hospitality Management (5). Presentation of management topics applied to the hospitality industry. May be repeated for credit under different Letters/Titles. Formerly LES 373

B.  Strategic Marketing in Hospitality

C.  Hospitality Sales and Advertising

D.  Convention Management

E.  Resort Management

F.  Front Office

RT 377. Introduction to Casino Management (3). An overview of the casino industry including: traditional casinos, riverboats; limited stakes casinos; historical perspective; legal, social, cultural and economic impacts; Indian gaming; regulation and control of gaming; and future trends in gaming industry. Formerly LES 377.

RT 379. Introduction to Cruise Line Management (3). An overview of the cruise industry including : cruise lines, ships, history of cruising, human resource practices, marketing, design, terminology and future trends. Formerly LES 379.

RT 380. Supervision in the Hospitality Industry (3). Prerequisite, RT 271 or Permission. Basics of supervising programs, personnel, and facilities with emphasis on practical supervisory skill development.

RT 381. Recreational Sports Management (3). Organization and implementation of recreational sports programs in community recreation settings. Emphasis on facilities, personnel, materials and supplies, tournament bracketing and other practical considerations. Formerly LES 381.

RT 393. Tourism and Recreation Agency Visitations (1-3). Off campus field visits, usually from two to three days in duration. Review of facilities, programs and clientele. Lecture and discussion by and with agency leader/supervisor/manager personnel pertaining to agency operations. Grade will be S or U. May be repeated for credit under different titles. Formerly LES 393.

A. Public Recreation Agencies
B. Voluntary/Youth Serving Agencies
C. Military Recreation Agencies
D. Commercial Recreation Agencies
E. Employee/Industrial Recreation Agencies
F. Tourism Related Agencies
G. Therapeutic/Rehabilitation Related Agencies
H. Senior Centers/Nursing Homes
I. Outdoor Recreation/Education Agencies
J. Resident Camps
K. Parks and Playgrounds
L. Sports and Aquatics
M. Community Centers
N. Destinations
O. Attractions
P. Hospitality
Q. Transportation

RT 398. Special Topics (1-5). Formerly LES 398.

RT 419. Applied Research (5). Prerequisite, senior class standing or permission of instructor. Develops critical thinking and research methods applied to current problems existing in recreation, and tourism agencies/businesses. Problem identification, conceptualization, operationalization, literature review, research skills, research methods, and report writing. Formerly LES 419.

RT 420. Research Analysis (4). Prerequisite, RT 419. Student research and presentation of an array of contemporary problems, issues and trends in the leisure services profession. Formerly LES 420.

RT 431. Resident Camp Programming (3). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Methods, techniques and skills used in the organization and operation of a resident camp program. Formerly LES 431.

RT 437. Interpretive Writing and Design (3). Prerequisite, RT 337. Advanced application of interpretive techniques to the design and development of interpretive publications, visitor center exhibits, and wayside exhibits and signs. Instruction will include an experiential field trip. Formerly LES 437.

RT 471. Planning and Development of Tourism (3). Prerequisite, RT 271. Economic, social, fiscal, environmental and political impacts of tourism; identifying and accessing tourism markets; the tourism planning and development process. Formerly LES 471.

RT 472. Issues in Gaming Management (3). Prerequisite, RT 377 or permission of instructor. Examines current social, economic, legal, geographic, technology, and marketing issues and trends in the gaming industry with emphasis on Indian gaming and responsible gaming issues. Students must be 21 years of age due to the age requirement for students to enter a casino during the course field trip. Formerly LES 472.

RT 473. Airline Operations (3). Prerequisite, RT 271. Examines the airline industry, it's components and methods of operation. Interaction with other segments of the industry . Procedures for working with the airlines.

RT 475. Professionalism in Tourism (2). Prerequisite, RT 292. Students will develop skills related to professionalism in the tourism industry along with assessing themselves in order to successfully enter their careers.

RT 480. Recreation and Tourism Administration (3). Prerequisite, RT 321, RT 380 or permission. Contemporary problems and issues; basic applied research; organizational development; policy formulation; human resources, inventory and program/personnel evaluation processes. Formerly LES 480.

RT 483. Budget and Finance (2). Budget types commonly used in leisure services agencies. Budget preparation skills, funding sources, budget presentation and defense, execution of allocated financial resources. Formerly LES 483.

RT 484. Legal Liability and Risk Management (3) Aspects of personnel law and premises liability in public, private and "not for profit" education, human and social services organizations. Procedures for managing risks. Open to recreation and tourism and physical education majors, and P.E.H.L.S. graduate students only. Same as PE 484, formerly PE 460 and LES 484. Students may not receive credit for both.

RT 485. Games and Adventure Activities (2). Prerequisite: Recreation Management major or minor. Games and activities appropriate for playgrounds, camps & community centers. Socialization, education, trust building, outdoor adventure and other activities. Field trips required. One hour lecture, 2 hours lab per week. Formerly LES 485.

RT 487. Outdoor Recreation Issues (3). Prerequisite, RT 330. This course addresses recent and breaking issues in the outdoor recreation field. The course involves readings and discussions in both the classroom and field environments. Formerly LES 487.

RT 490. Cooperative Education (1-12). Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Prior approval required. May be repeated. Grade will be S or U. Formerly LES 490.

RT 491. Workshop (1-6). Formerly LES 491.

RT 496. Individual Study (1-6). May be repeated. Formerly LES 496.

RT 498. Special Topics (1-6). Formerly LES 498.

RT 499. Seminar (1-5). Formerly LES 499.

Undergraduate Courses/Programs on Reserve

The following courses are on reserve and may be offered subject to program needs: PE 362 Dance in Education (4); PE 471 Philosophy of Elementary School Physical Education (3); PEAQ 115. Synchronized Swimming (1); PEAQ 119. Beginning Scuba Diving (1); PED 117. Advanced Folk Dance. PEF 120, Care Conditioning (1); PEID 111. Intermediate Badminton (1); PEID 117 Advanced Golf (1); PEID 118. Beginning Handball (1); PEID 121 Intermediate Fencing (1); PEID 122 Advanced Fencing (1); PEID 126. Beginning Wrestling (1); PEID 131, Snowshoeing (1); PEID 133, Backpacking (1); PEVM 119. Soccer.