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Registrar

2002 - 2003 History

Faculty
Chair: Karen J. Blair
Language and Literature 100

Professors:
Karen Blair, 20th Century U.S., Women's History
Beverly A. Heckart, Germany, Social and Economic History

Associate Professor:
Thomas Wellock, Contemporary U.S., Environmental, American West

Assistant Professors:
James Cook, East Asia
Roxanne Easley, Russia, Eastern Europe
Daniel Herman, U.S. History Pre 1877
Merle Kunz, History Education

Emeritus Professors:
Earl T. Glauert, Latin America
Kent Richards, American West, Pacific Northwest

General Departmental Information

The faculty of History offers courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts. Majors who desire to graduate with honors should consult the history honors director on the special requirements.

Students who declare a major in History must register with the Department.

History Honors Program

Qualified students are urged to enter the History Department's honors program. Entrance requirements include an overall GPA of 3.00, a GPA of 3.25 in history, and a minimum of 25 hours of history. Contact Department Chair for information.

Bachelor of Arts

History Major (4000)

It is recommended that students who plan to enter graduate school should complete two years of a foreign language at the college level.

Required Courses                       Credits

Select from the following:                          20
 HIST 101, 102, 103, World Civilization*
 HIST 143, 144, United States History
HIST 302, Introduction to History                    3
HIST 481, Understanding History                      3
Upper Division United States History                 5
Upper Division European History                      5
Upper Division African, Asian, Middle Eastern or 
  Latin American History                            10
Upper division History electives                 12-14

                                       Total     58-60**

*Western Civilization may be substituted.

**Students with fewer than 60 credits must have a minor
in order to graduate.

History: Teaching Broad Area Major (4011)

This major satisfies the Primary endorsements for History and Social Studies.

This major is designed for students in the secondary teacher training program. Students taking this major are required to complete the professional education program requirements offered through the Curriculum and Supervision Department.

Required Courses                       Credits

*HIST 101, 102, 103, World Civilization             15
HIST 143, 144, United States History                10
HIST 301, Pacific Northwest History                  3
HIST 302, Introduction to History                    3
HIST 421, Methods and Materials in the 
  Social Studies, Secondary OR
  **EDEL 420, Methods and Materials in the Social
    Sciences, Elementary                             3
HIST 481, Understanding History                      3
Select from the following:                          15
  Upper Division U.S. History (5)
  Upper Division European History (5)
  Upper Division African, Asian, Middle Eastern
    or Latin American History (5)
POSC 210, American Politics                          5
ECON 101, Economic Issues (5)  OR
  ECON 102, World Economic Issues(5)  OR
  ECON 201, Principles of Economics Micro(5)  OR
  ECON 202, Principles of Economics Macro(5)         5
ANTH 107, General Anthropology (5)  OR
  SOC 101, Social Problems (5)  OR
  SOC 107, Principles of Sociology (5)               5
Select from the following:                           5
  GEOG 101, World Regional Geography (5)
  GEOG 107, Physical Geography (5)
  GEOG 304, Economic Geography (5)
  GEOG 308, Cultural Geography (5)
Select from the following:                         3-5
  GEOG 352, Geography of North America (5)
  GEOG 355, Geography of the Pacific Northwest(4)
  GEOG 371, Geograpy of Europe (5)
  GEOG 415, Geography of Oceania (3)
  GEOG 470, Geography of South America (3)
  GEOG 471, Geography of Middle America (3)
  GEOG 474, Geography of China (4)
  GEOG 475, Geography of Asia (5)
                                       Total     75-77

*Western Civilization may be substituted.
**Prior completion of EDCS 311 recommended. Students
must be admitted to the Teacher Education program
prior to enrolling in this course.

 

History Minor (4000)

Required Courses                       Credits

Select from the following:                          10
  HIST 143, 144, United States History
  HIST 101, 102, 103, World Civilization*
Upper division History electives                    20

                                          Total     30
  *Western Civilization may be substituted.

History Teaching Minor (4015)

This minor satisfies the Supporting endorsement for History.

This teaching minor must be combined with another teaching major. This minor meets the requirements for supporting endorsement for certification.

 

Required courses                         Credits
HIST 143 or 144, United States History               5
HIST 301, Pacific Northwest History                  3
HIST 302, Introduction to History                    3
HIST 421, Methods and Materials in the
    Social Studies, Secondary                        3
Upper-division European History                    3-5
Upper-division Asian, Latin American,
    African, or Middle Eastern History             3-5
POSC 210, American Politics                          5
ECON 101, Economic Issues (5) or
    ECON 102, World Economic Issues (5) or
    ECON 201, Principles of Economics Micro (5) or
    ECON 202, Principles of Economics Macro (5)      5
Select from the following upper-division 
    regional geography                             3-5
  GEOG 352, Geography of North America (5)
  GEOG 355, Geography of the Pacific Northwest (4)
  GEOG 371, Geography of Europe (5)
  GEOG 415, Geography of Oceania (3)
  GEOG 450, Geography of Arid Lands (4)
  GEOG 470, Geography of South America (3)
  GEOG 471, Geography of Middle America (3)
  GEOG 474, Geography of China (4)
  GEOG 475, Geography of Asia (5)

                                Total     33-39

 

History Courses

HIST 101. World Civilization to 1500 (5). Origins and development of the major world civilizations to the 15th century. A comparative study of their political, social, and economic institutions, and their religious and intellectual backgrounds.

HIST 102. World Civilization: 1500-1815 (5). A comparative survey of political, social, economic and cultural developments. For general education (breadth) credit, it is preferred that a student be enrolled in or have completed ENG 101.

HIST 103. World Civilization Since 1815 (5). A comparative survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments. For general education (breadth) credit, it is preferred that a student be enrolled in or have completed ENG 101.

HIST 143. United States History to 1865 (5). The Colonial, Revolutionary and National periods.

HIST 144. United States History Since 1865 (5). Reconstruction, industrial America and 20th century urban America. For general education (breadth) credit, it is preferred that a student be enrolled in or have completed ENG 101.

HIST 298. Special Topics (1-6).

HIST 301. Pacific Northwest History(3). Exploration and settlement; subsequent political, economic, and social history with particular emphasis on Washington.

HIST 302. Introduction to History (3). Exercises in historical research, critical analysis and interpretation. Sophomore and junior history majors only.

HIST 312. Ancient Near East and Greece (5). Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Hellenic and Hellenistic civilizations from their earliest beginnings to the breakup of the Alexandrian Empire.

HIST 313. History of Rome 500 B.C. to 500 A.D. (5). Beginning, city-state, republican period; world empire; decline.

HIST 314.1. Military History of the United States (5). A comprehensive and systematic survey and analysis of the American military experience from Colonial times through the Vietnam war. Same as MLS 314.1. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 315. Muslim Middle East (3-5). The origins and spread of Islamic civilization and its interaction with Graeco-Roman, Persian, and Indian civilizations. Crusades and the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire.

HIST 316. Modern Middle East 1914 to the Present (3-5). The Arab revolt, the British-French mandates, nationalism, modernization, independence movements, Arab-Israeli struggle, Palestinians and oil politics.

HIST 322. World Prehistory (4). Old and New World prehistory from late Pliocene to the early historic period, including the ecology and development of hunting-gathering, agriculture and state-level societies. Same as ANTH 322. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 330. Africa to 1800 (5). The course is designed to explore Africa's earliest civilizations; internal processes of change; external influences; state formation; complex societies; connections to the world economy.

HIST 331. Colonial Africa (3-5). Africa on the eve of colonial conquest; causes of imperialism; colonial rule and African reactions and initiatives; independence and colonial legacy.

HIST 338. Conquests and Compromises: Indians and Europeans in North America since 1492 (5). This will be a discussion and lecture course on interactions between Native mericans and Europeans in North America since the arrival of Columbus.

HIST 339. Colonial British America (5). Social, cultural, political, and economic life in the British Colonies of North America to 1763.

HIST 340. The American Revolution (3-5). Causes and consequences of the American Revolution, 1688-1789. Corresponds to HIST 440 and HIST 540; credit given for only one course.

HIST 341. The United States: Early National Period 1789-1844 (3-5).

HIST 342. History of Black America to 1865 (5). A survey of the role of the African-American in American society from colonial times to 1865.

HIST 343. History of Black America since 1865 (3-5). A survey of the role of the African-American in American society from 1865 to present.

HIST 345. History of Social Services in the United States ( (3-5). Attitudes, policies and practices with regard to those people who require charitable assistance, public or private, from colonial times to the present.

HIST 346. Women in American History (3-5). A survey of the role of women, their treatment and response, in American society from colonial times to the present.

HIST 347. On the Border: Excursions in Southwestern History (5). Discussion and lecture course on ethnic collisions, environmental revolutions, and urban developments in the American Southwest since the time of the Ancestral Puebloans.

HIST 348. Economic History of the United States (5). Economic factors in the development of the American nation from the European background to the present. Same as ECON 348. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 352. The History of the American Family (3). American family patterns from early settlement to the present; demography, gender roles, courtship, marriage, child-raising, aging, ethnicity and alternative life styles.

HIST 354. American Environmental History (5). Environmental values and practices of the diverse populations of America. Corresponds to HIST 454 and 554. Credit given for only one of three courses.

HIST 371. Medieval European History( (3-5). From the breakup of the Roman Empire to the 16th century; political, economic, social, and religious thought and institutions.

HIST 373. History of Modern East Europe (5). Poland, Czech and Slovak Republics, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, with special attention to multi-ethnicity, economic underdevelopment and modernization, political dependence and nationalism.

HIST 381. History of Modern Southeast Asia: Colonial Era to the Present (5). This is a survey course in the political and cultural history of modern Southeast Asia. It will examine European colonialism, nationalism, decolonization, and post WWII configuration.

HIST 383. East Asian Civilization (5). A general survey of the development of civilization in China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia to about 1600.

HIST 385. Modern East Asia (5). Imperialism, nationalism and their effects in East Asia from ca. 1600 to the present.

HIST 386. The Latin American Colonies (5). Spanish and Portuguese colonial empires to completion of Latin American wars of independence (1825), focusing primarily on Peru and Brazil.

HIST 387. Argentina and Its Neighbors (5). Continuity and change in South America in the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on Argentina, Uruguay and Chile.

HIST 388. Economic History of Europe Since 1760 (3-5). The Industrial Revolution in Great Britain and on the Continent; the rise of trade unionism, socialism, anarchism, and imperialism in the 20th century. Same as ECON 388. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 395. Research in Local History (1-6). Comparative local history with emphasis on research techniques and the utilization of sources.

HIST 398. Special Topics (1-6).

HIST 421. Methods and Materials in the Social Studies, Secondary (3). Same as SOSC 421. Students may not receive credit for both. Prior completion of EDCS 311 recommended. Students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program prior to enrolling in this course.

HIST 425. Renaissance and Reformation (5). Same as HIST 525. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 430.1. Tudor-Stuart England (3-5). Same as HIST 530.1. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 431. Africa: The Crisis of Nation Building (5). An in-depth multi-disciplinary approach to the present political and socio-economic issues, problems and tensions in selected areas of Africa. Same as HIST 531. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 433. Selected Topics in African History (5). Specific matter will vary but emphasis will be on the social and cultural development of African states since pre-colonial times. Same as HIST 533. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 440. The American Revolution (5). Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution, 1688-1789. Corresponds to HIST 340 and HIST 540. Credit given for only one course.

HIST 443. The West in American History (3-5). Exploration, territorial acquisition, patterns of settlement, economic development, and the influence of the frontier on American institutions. Same as HIST 543. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 444. Sectionalism, Civil War and Reconstruction (3-5). Slavery, the Old South, sectionalism, the breakdown of the Union, and secession. A military, political, social history of North and South during the Civil War, and the aftermath of the war. Same as HIST 544. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 449. History of Women and the West (5). Women in the western United States, with emphasis on the ninteenth and twentieth centuries; myths and stereotypes; women's work; community roles; class and racial/ethnic differences. Same as HIST 549. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 450. Exploring U.S. Cultural History (5). Thematic approach to nineteenth-century cultural transformations in U.S. Selected topics: mesmerism, utopias, true womanhood, women's rights, slave spirituals, confidence men, gold rushes.

HIST 451. 20th Century U.S. 1896-1919 (3-5). Imperialism, Progressivism, and World War I. Same as HIST 551. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 452. 20th Century U.S. 1919-1945 (3-5). Prosperity and depression; the New Deal and its implications; World War II, origins and conclusion. Same as HIST 552. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 453. 20th Century U.S. 1945 to the Present (3-5). Cold War, sedentary 50s, rebellious 60s, the Watergate era. Same as HIST 553. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 463.2 History of American Foreign Relations, since 1941 (3-5). From Pearl Harbor to the present. Same as HIST 563.2. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 454. American Environmental History (5). Corresponds to HIST 354 and 554; credit given for only one course. See HIST 354 for description, but requires additional reading, research and writing assignments.

HIST 465. History of the People's Republic of China (5). Evaluates the historical record of the Chinese Communists in power since the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949. Same as HIST 565. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 471. German History, 1815-1918 (3-5). A political, diplomatic, socio-economic, and intellectual study of Germany from the end of the Napoleonic Era through World War I. Emphasis on German unification and the socio-economic background to World War I. Same as HIST 571. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 472. German History, 1918 to the Present (3-5). A political, socio-economic, and intellectual study of Germany with special attention to the causes, progress, and aftermath of the National Socialist State. Same as HIST 572. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 473. Russia to 1881 (3-5). The political, social, economic and cultural development of Russia from ancient times to the assassination of Alexander II. Same as HIST 573. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 474. Russia Since 1881 (3-5). The political, economic, social and cultural history of Russia and the Soviet Union since 1881. Same as HIST 574. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 479. Europe in the 20th Century (3-5). Events and movements which led to two wars; change in governmental structure in the cycles of war and peace. Same as HIST 579. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 481. Understanding History (3-5). Analysis of the nature of history, of the way historians reason, and of the search for meaning in history. Limited to seniors only.

HIST 482. Revolutionary China (3). The causes, course, and effects of the 20th century Chinese Revolution 1911-present. Same as HIST 582. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 483. Modern China (5). The history of China in the 19th and 20th centuries, including the nature of China's response to the West and the Chinese Revolution of the 20th century. Emphasis on internal social and economic change. Same as HIST 583. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 484. Modern Japan (3-5). The recent historical development of Japan beginning with the collapse of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the resumption of foreign contacts in the mid-19th century. Emphasis is given to the modernization process with its concomitant political, social, economic, and intellectual changes. Same as HIST 584. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 487. The Russian Revolutionary Movement (3-5). Origins and development of Russian radicalism through the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. Same as HIST 587. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 488. Mexico in the Modern Era (5). The modernization and nationalization of Mexico, with emphasis on the social history of Mexico's frontiers. Same as HIST 588. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 489. Cuba and the Caribbean (5). Foreign intervention and the domestic social structure of Caribbean America. Same as HIST 589. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 490. Cooperative Education (1-8). An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Prior approval required. May be repeated. Grade will be S or U. Same as HIST 590. Students may not receive credit for both.

HIST 496. Individual Study (1-6). Prerequisite, permission of instructor.

HIST 497. Honors Individual Study (1-6). Open to students accepted into the departmental honors program. This course may be repeated once, but no more than an over-all total of six credits per quarter is permitted.

HIST 498. Special Topics (1-6).

*The depth of coverage of the content of variable credit courses will vary according to the number of credits offered.

Undergraduate Courses/Programs on Reserve

The following courses are on reserve and may be offered subject to program needs: HIST 336. India, Ancient and Medieval, c. 3000 B.C. to 1555 A.D. (3-5). HIST 337. India, Mughal and Modern, 1556 to Present (3-5). HIST 442. Urban and Industrial America: 1877-1900 (3-5). HIST 458. French Revolution/Napolean (3). HIST 463. History of American Foreign Relations to 1900 (3-5). HIST 463.1 History of American Foreign Relations 1900 to 1941 (3-5). HIST 466. English Constitutional and Legal History (3-5). HIST 467. Diplomatic History of Europe: 1815-1914 (3-5). HIST 475. History of Modern France (5). HIST 491. Workshop (1-6).