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Registrar

2002 - 2003 Geography and Land Studies

Visit the http://www.cwu.edu/geography/ department home page.

Faculty
Chair: Karl Lillquist
Lind Hall 119C

Professors:
John A. Alwin, Human Geography, Geogoraphic Education, Pacific Rim, Asia, Western North America
James L. Huckabay, Energy Resources, Biogeography, Air Photo Interpretation, Africa
Nancy B. Hultquist, Economic Geography, GIS, Urban Geography, Computer Cartography
Morris L. Uebelacker, Human Geography, Yakima River Basin, Field Methods

Associate Professors:
Robert Kuhlken, Land-Use Planning, Cultural Ecology, Historical Geography, Oceania
Karl D. Lillquist, Geomorphology, Pedology, Climate Change, Arid and Alpine Environs

Assistant Professors:
J. Anthony Abbott, Political ecology, Agricultural Systems, Latin America
Anthony Gabriel, Biogeography, Environmental Studies, Coastal Zone Management, Pacific Northwest
Robert Hickey, GIS, Remote Sensing, Environmental Impacts, Coastal Zones, Australia
Christopher Kent, Physical Geography, Water Resources, Watershed Planning, North America

Adjunct Professors:
Elaine K. Glenn, Political Geography, World Regional Geography
Allan Sullivan, Physical Geography

General Departmental Information

Geography's traditional concern with the inter-relatedness of the natural and cultural environments, and reasons for their differences from place to place, provides important insights into many of the complex problems facing society today.

The Department stresses flexibility in the selection of course sequences for majors and encourages study in related departments among the social and natural sciences. The Department is an active participant in the following university programs: Environmental Studies, Energy Studies, Asia/Pacific Studies, Latin American Studies, International Studies and Programs, and Resource Management graduate program. The department also maintains a well-appointed Geographic Information Systems laboratory which benefits majors from other programs in addition to geography.

If you choose to major in Geography, you will be required to take a core sequence of five courses. The B.A. allows great flexibility in working out a major with the help of one of our faculty advisors. Your major will include the combination of courses in Geography and related fields, as approved by one of our departmental advisors, that will best enable you to achieve your goals in graduate school, planning, resource management, land development, or other land or resource related fields.

Students who declare a major in Geography must register with the Department.

Bachelor of Arts

Geography Major - 45 credits (3595)

Geography Major - 60 credits (3600)

This major allows you to work out a program that will prepare you for graduate work or any career where solid understanding of the relationships between humans and the surface of our earth is important. It will consist of 45-60 credit hours of work (including the core) in geography and related fields. Within the Geography major, the Department offers students the option of following any one of six specializations:
General Geography
Physical Geography Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Resource and Environmental Management
Land Use Planning
International/Foreign Area Studies
Recommended electives for each of these specializations have been formulated and these are listed in the department's student handbook. In consultation with an advisor, students are able to choose a specialization and design a program of component courses which best fits specific career goals and aspirations.

Students may choose either a 45 credit major (3595) or a 60 credit major (3600). Those who have a second major or who have a minor in another discipline may opt for the 45 credit major.

Required Courses                       Credits

GEOG 101, World Regional Geography                   5
GEOG 107, Introduction to Physical Geography         5
GEOG 108, Introduction to Human Geography OR	     5
GEOG 203, Map Reading and Interpretation	     3
GEOG 489, Geography Capstone			     2 
Department approved electives                 25 or 40
  Must include an upper division geography
  course in each of the four sub-fields: regional,
  physical, human, and techniques.
  45 credit major (25)
  60 credit major (40)

                                    Total     45 or 60

Geography: Teaching Major (3603)

Senior high school teachers are advised to accompany this with a major in a field in which a major portion of a full-time teaching assignment can be expected. Junior high school teachers must combine this with minors in both History and English. GEOG 203, Map Reading and Interpretation, provides map reading skills for all teaching levels. For elementary school teaching see the Teacher Education Programs Department. Students taking this major are required to complete the professional education program requirements offered through the Curriculum and Supervision Department.

Required Courses                       Credits

GEOG 101, World Regional Geography                   5
GEOG 107, Introduction to Physical Geography         5
*GEOG 203, Map Reading and Interpretation            3
GEOG 304, Economic Geography                         5
GEOG 308, Cultural Geography                         5
GEOG 386, Geomorphology OR
  GEOG 388, Climatology                              5
Regional Geography at 300 level or above          5-10
Systematic Geography at 300 level or above         3-7
Department approved electives                      3-7

                                          Total     46
  *A requirement for prospective teachers 
  (WAC 180-79-356). WAC also requires a minimum
  of 24 credits for endorsement to teach in the
  public schools.

Geography Minor (3600)

Required Courses                                Credits

GEOG 101, World Regional Geography                   5
GEOG 107, Introduction to Physical Geography         5
GEOG 108, Introduction to Human Geography	     5
GEOG 203, Map Reading and Interpretation             3
Any upper division geography courses	             7

                                       Total        25

*A requirement for prospective teachers (WAC 180-79-356). WAC also requires a minimum of 24 credits for endorsement to teach in the public schools.

Certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

The GIS certificate provides recognition for students completing the required number of GIS-related classes (26 credits) at a high level of competence (minimum average GPA of 2.7). Certification will provide students with a powerful tool to assist their future job searches.

Required Courses                                Credits

GEOG 303/403, Introductory GIS                       5
GEOG 404, Intermediate GIS                           4
GEOG 410, Airphoto Interpretation                    4
GEOG 430, Remote Sensing                             5
Choose from the following electives*                 8
  GEOG 409, Quantitative Methods (4)
  GEOG 413, Computer Cartography (4)
  GEOG 417, Advanced GIS (4)
  GEOG 485, Topics in GIS/Remote Sensing (4)
  GEOG 496, Independent Study (GIS Topics)** (1-6)
  GEOG 490, Cooperative Education 
    (GIS Topics) (1-12)
  GEOG 493, Geography Field Experience 
    (GIS Topics) (1-12)
  CS 301, Data Structures (4)
  Other electives as approved by the Director

                                          Total     26

*A minimum of 8 credits taken from the list of electives
at least 4 credits of which must be a "GIS" class. All 
electives must be approved by the certificate director.

**Students may also take Advanced GIS or Introduction 
to Visual Basic for ESRI Software as 1 credit GEOG 496 
classes up to a maximum of 4 classes (both to CWU and ESRI).

 

Geography Courses

GEOG 101. World Regional Geography (5). Regions and nations of the world together with the changing elements of the physical and human environment which support them.

GEOG 107. Introduction to Physical Geography (5). The complex weather, climate, water, landforms, soils, and vegetation comprising Earth's physical environments over space and time.

GEOG 108. Introduction to Human Geography (5). Distribution of population, settlement patterns, cultural elements of language, religion, and lifeways, and the economic and political organization of the planet.

GEOG 203. Map Reading and Interpretation (3). Basic introduction to the principles of cartographic communication. Emphasis on using and understanding a wide variety of general purpose, topographic, and thematic map types.

GEOG 215. Concepts in GIS (3). Basic principles and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Practice with the use of GIS in solving land management and evaluation problems. Two hours lecture and 4 hours lab per week.. Same as ANTH 215. Formerly GEOG/ANTH 215. Students may not receive credit for both.

GEOG 221. Introduction to Geography (3). Using maps and other learning tools to understand spatial distributions and interactions of Earth's peoples, places, resources, and evnironments. Specifically designed for elementary school teachers.

GEOG 273. Geography of Rivers (5). Global, regional, and local physical and cultural patterns and processes within river basins.

GEOG 303. Introductory Cartography and GIS (5). Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Applications, scope, and benefits of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Classification and components of GIS. Data acquisition. Data management. Data errors. Implementation considerations. Applied experience using GIS software. Same as GEOG 403. Formerly GEOG 384. Student may not receive credit for both.

GEOG 304. Economic Geography (5). Geographic survey of human livelihood and interaction with the environment. Agriculture, industry, and urbanization are examined in the context of an increasingly interdependent world system. Formerly GEOG 205. Student may not receive credit for both.

GEOG 305. Introduction to Land Use Planning (5). Investigation into the process and practice of urban and regional planning. Emphasis on historical development, legal foundations, and techniques of planning in the United States.

GEOG 308. Cultural Geography (5). Consequences of cultural diversity in the human occupation of the earth, and the interactions of human and natural systems in the formation of distinctive landscapes.

GEOG 310. Introduction to Landscape Analysis (5). Application of concepts and techniques of landscape analysis. Specific landscapes are analyzed utilizing various techniques including remotely sensed imagery, historical records, and field observation and measurement.

GEOG 343. Energy Resource Alternatives (3). Solar, wind, water and biomass alternatives to traditional energy resources. Alternatives in power production, architecture, heating, transportation, agriculture and policies affecting their implementation. (Not open to students with credit in GEOG 398, Low Energy Living.)

GEOG 346. Political Geography (4). The spatial structure of political units. The effect of political, economic, social and earth resource factors on the areas, shapes, and boundaries of these units, and on the distribution of populations and institutions.

GEOG 350. Resources, Population and Conservation (4). The meaning of resources and conservation; population growth and its implications for land management, public control, and environment quality; attitudes regarding the use of resources; conservation thought and activities in the United States.

GEOG 352. Geography of North America (5). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the United States, Canada and Mexico.

GEOG 355. Geography of the Pacific Northwest (4). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the Pacific Northwest.

GEOG 366. Geography of the Middle East (4). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the Middle East.

GEOG 371. Geography of Europe (5). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Europe.

GEOG 373. Water Resources (4). No prerequisites but GEOG 107 is recommended. Foundation course for understanding the physical and social dimensions of water resource use on a global scale. Special attention paid to issues in the American West.

GEOG 386. Geomorphology (5). Prerequisites, GEOG 107 or GEOL 145 or 150 and 145.1. Descriptive and interpretive examination of the earth's land forms. Four lectures and three hours laboratory or field trips. GEOG 386 and GEOL 386 are the same course. Students may not receive credit for both.

GEOG 387. Pedology (5). GEOG 107 or permission of instructor. Soil properties, factors, processes, and classification. Emphasis on interpretation of soil genesis related to present and past landscapes. Four hours lecture and four hours field/laboratory per week. Course fee required.

GEOG 388. Climatology (5). Prerequisite, GEOG 107 or instructor's permission. Elements of, and factors and processes affecting, Earth's climates present, past, and future. Four hours lecture and two haours laboratory/field per week.

GEOG 389. Ecosystem Geography (5). Investigates the functional relationships between biophysical processes and their spatial and temporal patterns at various scales. Introduces approaches to land systems analysis focusing upon ecosystems.

GEOG 398. Special Topics (1-6).

GEOG 399. Seminar (1-5).

GEOG 403. Introductory Cartography and GIS (5). Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Applications, scope, and benefits of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Classification and components of GIS. Data acquisition. Data management. Data errors. Implementation considerations. Applied experience using GIS software. Same as GEOG 303. Formerly GEOG 303/403. Student may not receive credit for both.

GEOG 404. Intermediate GIS (4). Prerequisite, GEOG 303/403 or permission. Applied concepts, principles, and operation of fundamental GIS applications, including raster-vector data models, topology, digitizing, and various analytical techniques such as overlay, buffers, and Boolean queries. Lecture and practical applications. Same as ANTH 404 and GEOL 404. Formerly ANTH/GEOG/GEOL 385.

GEOG 405. Advanced Topics in Land Use Planning (3). Prerequisite, GEOG 305. Selected issues and problems in land use planning and environmental control. Topics may include growth management, small town and rural planning, or coastal zone management. May be repeated.

GEOG 408. Advanced Topics in Human Geography (3). Focuses on the content of GEOG 308 in greater detail with particular emphasis on land use in non industrial societies. (Topics will vary, consult with instructor.)

GEOG 409. Quantitative Methods in Geography (4). Prerequisite, MATH 130.1, equivalent transfer or HS credit. Quantitative analysis assessment in geography and resource management. Emphasis on spatial statistics.

GEOG 410. Airphoto Interpretation (4). Prerequisite, instructor's permission. Introduction to airborne photography, and the tools and techniques to apply this photography to geographical issues. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOG 413. Computer Cartography (3). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Computerized mapmaking basics of contour, choropleth, 3-D, and other thematic maps from digitizing to final color product. Applied experience using cartographic software.

GEOG 415. Geography of Oceania (3). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands.

GEOG 417. Advanced GIS (4). Prerequisite, GEOG 404, ANTH 404, or GEOL 404 or permission of instructor. Advanced GIS principles, techniques, analysis, and application. Lecture and practical hands-on experience. Applied experience using GIS software. Same as ANTH 417 and GEOL 417.

GEOG 421. Practical Aids in Teaching Geography (3). Materials and methods appropriate to teaching geography in public schools. Students will become proficient in using maps, the globe, and other geographic media, including the Internet.

GEOG 425. Field Methods in Geography (5). Theory of, and practice in, geography field methods via in-depth field research projects. Topics include field observation, data collection, and data interpretation. Two hours lecture and five hours field per week.

GEOG 430. Remote Sensing (5). Prerequisites, GEOG 410 or GEOL 210, or permission of instructor. Principles of acquisition, analysis, and use of remotely sensed data (LANDSAT, SPOT, Ikonos, etc.). Applied experience using image processing software. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Same as GEOL 430 and GEOL 530. Students may not receive credit for more than one course.

GEOG 440. Ecology and Culture (4). Investigation into interdependent environmental and human cultural systems. Traditional agro ecologies and subsistence strategies; contemporary problems of resource management, social equity, political ecology, and sustainable development. Same as ANTH 440. Students may not receive credit for both.

GEOG 443. Energy Policy (5). Prerequisite, PHYS 111 or permission. Legal, institutional, and economic frameworks for regional, national and international energy decisions.

GEOG 445. Natural Resources Policy (4). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Development and significance of policies affecting resource management in the United States.

GEOG 446. Land Use in the United States (3). Historical geography of settlement and the evolution of subsequent land use patterns in the United States in response to changing economic and environmental conditions.

GEOG 447. Problems in Resource Allocation (4). Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Selected current problems in resource allocation.

GEOG 448. Resource and Environmental Analysis (5). Examination of the techniques and methodologies used for the evaluation and sustainable management of environmental resources from a variety of perspectives.

GEOG 450. Geography of Arid Lands (4). Unique physical environments of arid lands, and human interaction with these environments over space and time. Focus on natural resources and land use conflicts.

GEOG 451. Mountain Environments (4). Prerequisites, GEOG 107 and GEOG 108, or instructor's permission. Physical, human, and resource geography of mountain settings, Emphasis on the western hemisphere.

GEOG 452. Coastal Environments (4). Physical, human, and resource geography of coastal environments. Emphasis on physical processes, resource issues, and environmental management of coastal environments.

GEOG 453. Wetlands Analysis (4). Physical, human, and resource geography of wetland environments. Emphasis on physical processes, resource issues, and environmental evaluation and management of wetland environments.

GEOG 460. Geography of International Trade (5). Prerequisite, GEOG 304 or permission of the instructor. Geographic basis of international trade with special emphasis on the Pacific Northwest. Field trips required.

GEOG 465. Wine: A Geographical Appreciation (3). World overview of grape and wine industry emphasizing geographic themes. Includes all-day field trip to Yakima Valley viticultural area.

GEOG 470. Geography of South America (3). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the South American continent.

GEOG 471. Geography of Middle America (3). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.

GEOG 473. Watershed Analysis and Planning (4). Prerequisite: GEOG 373 or permission of instructor. Examination of water resource analysis, development, management, and planning in the United States. Focus on contemporary problems, trends, and case studies.

GEOG 474. Geography of China (4). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of China.

GEOG 475. Geography of Asia (5). Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Asia.

GEOG 476. Advanced Geomorphology (2-4). Prerequisites, GEOG 386 or GEOL 386, or instructor's permission. Selected advanced topics in geomorphology. Topics may include arid geomorphology, holistic watershed geomorphology, glacial geomorphology, and mass wasting geomorphology.

GEOG 477. Advanced Pedology (2-4). Prerequisites: GEOG 387 or permission of instructor. Selected advanced topics in soils. Topics may include Quaternary soils and composting. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits.

GEOG 478. Advanced Climatology (2-4). Prerequisites, GEOG 388 or permission of instructor. Selected advanced topics in climatology. Topics may include bioclimatology, Quaternary climate change, future climate change and microclimatology.

GEOG 479. Geography of the West (1-12). Prerequisites, instructor's permission. In-depth field examination of the complex physical, human, and resource issues of one or more of the varied subregions of western North America. May be repeated for credit by permission of department chair.

GEOG 481. Urban Geography (5). Prerequisite, GEOG 304 or permission of instructor. The spatial and size distribution of cities as explained by their historical development and major functions. Analysis of the internal structure of cities and the results of urban growth.

GEOG 485. Topics In GIS and Remote Sensing (4). Prerequisites, GEOG 403, GEOG 430, or permission of instructor. Special topic classes in GIS and remote sensing. Applied experience using GIS or image processing software.

GEOG 489. Geography Capstone (2). Prerequisite, Geography major with senior standing. Assessment of past coursework and exploration of future opportunities in Geography.

GEOG 490. Cooperative Education (1-12). An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Prior approval required. May be repeated. Grade will be S or U.

GEOG 491. Workshop (1-6).

GEOG 492. Applied GIS Project (2-6). Prerequisite, GEOG/ANTH 215 and permission of instructor. GIS projects in Anthropology, Biology, Geography, Geology, Resource Management. May be repeated for credit. Same as ANTH 492 and GEOL 492.

GEOG 493. Geography Field Experience (1-12). Prerequisite, permission of instructor and Department Chair. Individual or group off-campus field study of geographical phenomena. May be taken more than once by permission of department chair.

GEOG 494. Geography Teaching Experience (1-3). Prerequisites, 15 credits in Geography and instructor's permission. Experience in classroom, laboratory, and/or field teaching. May be repeated for credit with permission of chair.

GEOG 496. Individual Study (1-6). Prerequisite, permission of instructor.

GEOG 498. Special Topics (1-6).

GEOG 499. Seminar (1-5).