Skip to body

Psychology

School Psychology: About

About

Program
Information

Admission
Requirements
HandbookFAQsFaculty

What is School Psychology?

School Psychology is a specialty area within the fields of psychology and education that focuses on promoting positive development for children and adolescents. School Psychologists work primarily in K-12 educational settings as members of the educational team along with other professionals, such as teachers, counselors, administrators, speech language pathologists, and other specialists. They provide assessment, counseling, and consultation services for students who may be experiencing learning, emotional, or behavioral challenges. They also work to help promote best practices in schools and school districts.

The primary professional organization for school psychologists in the United States is the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). Please check out the NASP website for more information about the roles of the school psychologist (http://www.nasponline.org/about_sp/whatis.aspx). In addition to NASP, the primary professional organization for school psychologists is the Washington State Association of School Psychologists (WSASP). The website for WSASP (http://www.wsasp.org/) contains information about school psychology in the state of Washington.

Career Prospects in School Psychology

There are excellent career prospects in school psychology both in the state of Washington and across the country. School Psychology has been consistently cited as one of the best careers in a number of ratings. For example, in the U.S. News & World Report Best Jobs of 2013 publication, School Psychologist was ranked as the 14th best overall career (http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings) and it was ranked the #1 job in the Social Services area (http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/school-psychologist). Graduates of our program have been very successful in finding positions in Washington and across the country. It is projected that the need for school psychologists will remain high both in Washington and across the country (http://www.nasponline.org/advocacy/spworkforce.aspx).