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Psychology

Scholarships

Background.  Elizabeth “Libby” Street joined the CWU Department of Education faculty in 1979 and then moved to the Department of Psychology in 1983.  She earned her doctorate in education and general psychology from West Virginia University and was the first PhD student under Dr. Julie Vargas, the daughter of the noted psychologist, B.F. Skinner. 

Early in her career Libby worked for Dr. Sidney Bijou, who helped her pioneer the use of behavioral therapy for treating childhood disorders.  During the 1994-95 academic year, Libby served on the US Senate education committee staff of Senator Edward Kennedy as an American Association for the Advancement of Science-American Psychological Association Congressional Science Fellow.  From 1999-2010, she served full time as the assistant to the president of CWU and was a member of the president’s cabinet through tree presidential tenures, all while teaching at least one course per year.  In 2010, she returned to full-time teaching in the Psychology Department. 

A board certified behavior analyst and consultant to programs for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, Libby has worked with Seattle’s Morningside Academy for more than 30 years.  She co-authored several papers and two books, The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction: What it Means to Leave No Child Behind, and Response to Intervention and Precision Teaching: Creating Synergy in The Classroom, with Dr. Kent Johnson, the academy’s founder and director.

Purpose.  The purpose of the Elizabeth Street Scholarship for Applied Behavior Analysis scholarship is to provide funds for an in-state graduate student accepted to the MS of Science Applied Behavior Analysis program.  A committee appointed by the CWU Psychology Department will review eligible applicants and will award the scholarship based on a review of a strong record of scholarship and an essay of no more than 300 words from applicants describing career goals for working with autistic adolescents or special needs children.

Application.  Eligible applicants will submit a current CV and a 300-word essay describing career goals for working with autistic adolescents or special needs children to the Psychology Department no later than February 1.  Scholarship recipients will be notified between March and June.

If you have any questions regarding the application process, please email Dr. Mary Radeke at mary.radeke@cwu.edu.


 

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