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Psychology

Heath Marrs

Professor of Psychology

Director, School Psychology Program
Co-Director, Community Counseling and Psychological Assessment Center


Ed.D., Educational Psychology, Kansas State University
Ed.S., School Psychology, Fort Hays State University
M.S., School Psychology, Fort Hays State University
B.A., Psychology, Tabor College.

Office: Psychology Bldg, Room 118
Phone: (509) 963-2391
E-mail: marrsh@cwu.edu

Dr. Heath Marr's Curriculum Vitae

Courses typically taught at CWU:

  • PSY 501 - Professional Seminar in School Psychology
  • PSY 525 - Psychology of Reading
  • PSY 566 - Behavioral and Social-Emotional Assessment
  • PSY 592 - Practicum
  • PSY 467 - Child Psychopathology
  • PSY 447 - Psychology of Adolescence

General areas of interest:  School psychology, educational psychology, RTI models in school psychology practice, gender issues in education

Selected works:

  • Perez, H., Marrs, H., & Marsicano, R. (2017). A snapshot of barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation: Perspectives of school psychologists. The WERA Educational Journal, 10 (1), 38-43.
  • Bogue, H., Marrs, H., & Little, S. (2017). School psychologists’ stages of concern with RTI implementation. Contemporary School Psychology, 21, 115-124.
  • Little, S., Marrs, H., & Bogue, H. (2017). Elementary school psychologists and Response to Intervention (RTI). Contemporary School Psychology, 21, 103-114.
  • Marrs, H. (2016). Conformity to masculine norms and academic engagement in college men. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 17, 197-205.
  • Marrs, H., & Little, S. (2014). Perceptions of school psychologists regarding barriers to Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation. Contemporary School Psychology, 18, 24-34.
  •  Marrs, H. (2013). Team-based Learning: An innovative approach to promoting transfer and knowledge in school psychology training. Trainers’ Forum: The Journal of the Trainers of School Psychologists, 31, 47-61.
  •  Marrs, H., Sigler, E., & Brammer, R. (2012). Gender, masculinity, femininity, and help seeking in college. Masculinities and Social Change, 1(3), 267-292. doi: 10.4471/MCS.2012.16
  • Marrs, H., & Sigler, E. (2012). Male academic performance in college: The possible role of study strategies. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 13, 227-241.
  • Marrs, H. (2011). Increasing learner engagement with team-based learning. In R. L. Miller, E. Amsel, B. M. Kowalewski, B. C. Beins, K. D. Keith, & B. F. Peden (Eds.), Promoting student engagement: Vol. 1, Programs, techniques, and opportunities (pp.185-191). Retrieved from the American Psychological Association Division 2 Society for the Teaching of Psychology Web Site: http://teachpsych.org/resources/e-books/pse2011/index.php 

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