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Primate

Graduate Program 2014 Student Cohort

Krista (Kris) Banda graduated from Emory University with double majors in Anthropology and Psychology. She arrived at her interest in primate parasite ecology through a circuitous path that started by working in a neuroscience lab to being a primate intern to working in a Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International lab. Her research in Peru is focused on the intestinal parasites of saddleback (Saguinus fuscicollis) and emperor tamarins (S. imperator). Her faculty advisor is Dr. Gabrielle Stryker.

Allison Farley graduated in 2009 from Sonoma State University, CA with a B.A. in Environmental Science and a Minor in Biology. She previously interned in the Bay Area monitoring populations of endemic endangered species. She is currently a volunteer at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest, and will be pursuing a career in captive chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) care. Her thesis research focuses on the welfare of the seven chimpanzees that reside at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest. Her faculty advisor is Dr. Lori Sheeran.

Farley, Allison Ann, Comparison of chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) behavior on tour and non-tour days at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest / 2016

Ruth LinskyThesis advisors: Dr. Joseph Lorenz and Dr. Steve Wagner

Brianna Schnepel received her B.A. in Anthropology from San Diego State University in 2013. She has previously worked with white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) and mantled howler monkeys (Alouatta palliate) while attending a field school in Costa Rica. She also looked at interactions between bonobos (Pan paniscus) and human (Homo sapiens) visitors at the San Diego Zoo while assisting a graduate student from San Diego State University during her undergraduate studies. Her thesis research focuses on the effects that human food may have on the social interactions and behavior of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) living at a tourist site; Mt. Huangshan, China. Her faculty advisor is Dr. Lori Sheeran.

Schnepel, Brianna, Provisioning and its effects on the social interactions of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China / 2016


Holly Soubiea graduated in 2014 from Holy Names University with a B.A in Psychology and a minor in Biology.  She has previously been an Animal Care Intern at the Oakland Zoo, where she worked with chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas), and gibbons(Hylobates lar). She is currently a volunteer at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest. Her thesis research focuses on chimpanzees' use of their enclosures at Fauna Foundation. Her faculty advisor is Dr. Mary Lee Jensvold.
Emily Veitia graduated from Florida International University with a BA in Sociology/Anthropology and a minor in Geography. She previously volunteered at the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest and currently volunteers at the Mimulus Guttatus lab with Dr. Alison Scoville. Emily's thesis research focuses on cross-species interactions mixed-species ape (Nomascus leucogenys and Pongo abelii & pygmaeus) exhibit at the Oregon Zoo where she conducted research during the summer 2015. Her faculty advisor is Dr. Lori Sheeran.

Kaitlin Wright received her B.A. in Biological Anthropology, along with a minor in Biology, from the University of San Diego in 2011. She has previously worked with the Orangutan Foundation International in Kalimantan, Indonesia and the Pacific Primate Sanctuary on Maui, Hawaii. Her thesis research was conducted at the Valley of the Wild Monkey in Mt. Huangshan, China and is focused on the rate of selected play signals in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) during juvenile play bouts. Her faculty advisor is Dr. Lori Sheeran.

Wright, Kaitlin R., Play in immature Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) : location, use of play signals, and play bout termination at Mt. Huangshan, China / 2016

 

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