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Primate

Graduate Program 2009 Student Cohort

Daniel Arrañaga received his B.A. in Psychology with a focus on Animal Behavior at the University of Texas at San Antonio. His thesis research completed at CWU focuses on primate functional morphology. Dr. Steve Wagner is the chair of his thesis committee.

Daniella Bismanovsky received a B.S. in Experimental Psychology from Saint Mary’s College of California. Daniella completed the M.S. degree at CWU in Spring, 2012. Her thesis examined the effect of visitors’ behaviors on the chimpanzees’ behaviors at the Oakland Zoo in California. Dr. Mary Lee Jensvold was her thesis committee chair. She is currently a law student at Louis & Clark Law School in Portland, OR.

Bismanovsky, Daniella, Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) responses to visitors using chimpanzee-friendly behaviors / 2012

Jensvold ML; Zager L; Bismanovsky D. 2013. Promoting nonhuman animal welfare: interactions with caregivers and zoo visitors. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science 16: 384-385.

Grace Enlow received a B.A. in Anthropology and Study of Religion from University of California-San Diego. Grace completed the M.S. degree at CWU in Summer, 2011. She studied vocalizations and pair-bond strength in wild, white-bearded gibbons (Hylobates agilis albiarbis) in Central Kalimantan, Borneo. Dr. Lori Sheeran was her thesis committee chair. She is currently a chimpanzee caregiver at Center for Great Apes.

Enlow, Grace Skye, Singing, behavioral synchrony, and proximity in Bornean agile gibbons (Hylobates albibarbis) / 2011

Rebecca Hendershott majored in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at University of California, Santa Cruz. Rebecca completed the M.S. degree at CWU in winter, 2012. She studied the sociosexual behaviors of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys in Mt. Huangshan, China. Dr. Megan Matheson was her thesis committee chair. She is currently applying to Ph.D. programs.

Hendershott, Rebecca Lynne, Socio-sexual behavior in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) / 2011

Tracy Campion received her B.A. in Social Sciences with a minor in Anthropology from the University of Washington. Tracy completed the M.S. degree at CWU in spring, 2012. She examined gesture modality in relation to the attentional state in chimpanzees at Gombe in Tanzania, Africa. Dr. Mary Lee Jensvold was her thesis committee chair.She is currently a writer at Posada Safe Haven.

Campion, Tracy Lynn, Use of gesture sequences in free-living chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) play in Gombe National Park, Tanzania / 2012

Campion TL; Jensvold ML; Larsen G. 2011. Use of gesture sequences in free-living chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. American Journal of Primatology 73(S1): 97.

William Ramirez received a B.A. in Anthropology with a concentration in Physical Anthropology from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2009. At CWU, Will examined zoonotic disease transmission in wild capuchins (Cebus) in Ecaudor. Dr. Joseph Lorenz is his thesis committee chair.

Julie Wescliff received a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Louisville. Julie completed the M.S. degree at CWU in spring, 2012. She studied the impact of proximity on behavior in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China. Dr. Megan Matheson was her thesis committee chair. She is currently Coordinator for Short-term Programming at Edmonds Community College.

Wescliff, Julie Brooke, How close is too close? : spatial proximity dynamics of Macaca thibetana / 2012

Sandra Winters received a BS in Psychology and Anthropology from the University of Maryland at College Park. Sandra completed the M.S. degree at CWU in summer, 2011. She studied recruitment behavior in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China, for evidence of triadic awareness. Dr. Megan Matheson was her thesis committee chair. She is currently a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology and the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology at New York University.

Winters, Sandra, Social recruitment in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China / 2011

Janie Gibbons received a BA from the University of Northern Colorado with a major in Psychology and a minor in Anthropology. AT CWU, she studied object manipulation and triadic interactions during play by chimpanzees living at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest. Dr. Megan Matheson is her thesis committee chair. She is currently employed at Save the Chimps.