CWUNews FeedNews Feedhttp://www.cwu.edu/music/newsen-usBrahms sonatas on strings, piano at CWUhttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3545Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:55:03<p>CWU professors Denise Dillenbeck, violin, and violist Timothy Betts along with guest cellist, Kevin Hekmatpanah, will join CWU faculty pianist John Pickett in presenting a recital of the duo chamber sonatas of Johannes Brahms on Sunday, February 1, at 1:00 p.m., in the Music building’s Concert Hall.&nbsp; The sonatas of Brahms represent the composer at the peak of his melodic and technical writing and are considered some of the greatest works in the string/piano repertoire.</p>Stirring Rendition of Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus” Airs January 19http://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3540Fri, 16 Jan 2015 10:35:38<p><img alt="" src="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/images/handel.jpg" style="width: 204px; height: 247px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;"><span style="line-height: 1.4;">The best-known choral piece in history—Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus”—will be aired on “Central On-Stage” on January 19.</span></p><p>Nikolas Caoile, Central Washington University’s Director of Orchestras, will host “Central On Stage” at 7:00 p.m. Monday, January 19, on KCTS-TV, on your local public broadcasting station.</p><p>The program showcases the CWU’s Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Choir performing the second part of Handel’s Messiah. All solos are sung by music students at CWU.</p><p>Part II is the most dramatic part of the oratorio, starting with Jesus’ persecution and ultimate crucifixion, and following the story through the resurrection. The “Hallelujah Chorus” is the final number of the broadcast.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p>Musica Anitqua Presents Winter Concerthttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3538Thu, 08 Jan 2015 08:26:27<p>The CWU Department of Music presents the second of this year’s Musica Antiqua concerts in the McIntyre Music Building Recital Hall, on Sunday, January 11th at 4 PM.&nbsp; This Musica Antiqua program is titled "in stil moderno," and presents music written in the early seventeenth-century in a style that is both virtuosic and expressive. This early baroque ensemble music is organized on principles of rhetoric, where the meaning of the words take priority over musical form. Featured instruments are cornetto and baroque trombone, were common in early seventeenth-century Italy, but rarely heard today. Our guest artists are members of the early music group Ensemble Primo Seicento: Charlie Hankin, baroque violin, Bodie Pfost, baroque trombone and Doug Sears, cornetto. Melissa Shiel, CWU faculty member, is featured vocal soloist and Musica Antiqua director Margret Gries will be organist for this program. &nbsp;</p>PDQ Bach to Speak at CWUhttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3537Wed, 07 Jan 2015 14:28:01<p>Peter Schickele (aka PDQ Bach) will be presenting a humorous lecture entitled “Why Music is Funny” in the Jerilyn S. McIntyre Music Building Concert Hall on Friday, January 16 at 2:00 PM.&nbsp; Peter Schickele is internationally known as a composer, musicologist, multifaceted performer, radio host, and recording artist.&nbsp; Since 1965 the tireless Professor has kept audiences in stitches with his presentation of P.D.Q. Bach’s uniquely typical music.&nbsp; In addition to his annual concerts in New York City, he has appeared with over fifty orchestras, ranging from the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, the London Symphony Orchestra and the Los Angeles Philharmonic to the New York Pick-Up Ensemble; and his self-contained show The Intimate P.D.Q. Bach (featuring the Semi-Pro Musica Antiqua) has played in cities and on campuses from Maine to California.&nbsp; He has released 11 albums, his book entitled “The Definitive Biography of PDQ Bach” is in its eleventh printing, and he has numerous DVDs and music compositions that are performed all over the world.&nbsp; Admission is free and open to the public.</p><p><img alt="" src="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/images/Peter%20Schickele.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 246px;"></p>JOHN PICKETT, PIANIST, IN RECITAL at CWUhttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3532Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:22:45<p>CWU Piano professor John Pickett will perform a special recital dedicated to the last 3 Piano sonatas of Beethoven on Friday, January 9, at 7 p.m. in the McIntyre Music Building Concert Hall.&nbsp; Professor Pickett will introduce each of these last sonatas that show Beethoven to be at his expressive and compositional peak.</p><p>John Pickett has performed in recitals worldwide and has been noted for his “perfect sound balance, great intuition and sensibility,” and following his Carnegie Recital Hall debut, The New York Times praised his “impeccable” pianism.</p><p>This recital is free and open to the public.</p>CWU on Stage Features Unique Range of Musical Offeringshttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3522Fri, 12 Dec 2014 14:07:35<p><img alt="" src="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/images/symphony.jpg" style="width: 422px; height: 320px;"></p><p>Nikolas Caoile, CWU’s Director of Orchestras, will host <em>Central On Stage</em> at 7:00 p.m. Monday, December 15, on KCTS-TV, the local public broadcasting station. It is a recording of the Symphony Orchestra’s June 8 concert.</p><p>The program covers a range of musical periods and styles, from Franz Krommer’s <em>Concerto in E-flat Major for Two Clarinets and Orchestra, Op. 91</em>, written in 1815, to Leonard Bernstein’s <em>Symphonic Dances from West Side Story</em>, which debuted in 1957.</p><p>Also featured are students Monica Freshley and Alisyn Christensen as conductors. Music student Matt Grey is the trombone soloist in Ferdinand David’s <em>Concertino for Trombone and Orchestra, Op. 4</em>. Professor Joseph Brooks, and his son, Jeff, are the clarinetists in Krommer’s <em>Concerto for Two Clarinets</em>.<br><br>Below is the program:</p><p>Grand Pas de Trois from <em>Les Corsaire</em><br>Adolphe Adam (1803-1856)<br>I. Grand Pas de Trois<br>II. Variation: Male<br>III. Variation:Female<br>IV. Variation:Conrad<br>V. Coda<br>Monica Freshely, graduate conductor</p><p><em>Concertino for Trombone and Orchestra, Op. 4</em><br>Ferdinand David (1810-1873)<br>I. Allegro maestoso<br>II. Marcia funebre (Andante)<br>III. Allegromaestoso</p><p>Matthew Grey, trombone (2013 Concerto Competition Winner)<br>Alisyn Christensen, graduate conductor</p><p><em>Concerto in E-flat Major, for Two Clarinets and Orchestra, Op. 91</em><br>Franz Krommer (1759-1831)<br>I. Allegro<br>II. Adagio<br>III. AllaPolacca</p><p>Joseph &amp; Jeff Brooks, clarinets</p><p><em>Symphonic Dances from West Side Story</em><br>Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)</p><p>I. Prologue<br>II. Somewhere<br>III. Scherzo<br>IV. Mambo<br>V. Cha-cha<br>VI. Meeting Scene<br>VII. Cool Fugue<br>VIII.Rumble<br>IX. Finale<br>&nbsp;</p>CWU Alumna performs on Good Morning Americahttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3496Wed, 05 Nov 2014 11:20:27<p>Heather Thomas, a multitalented percussionist who honed her skills at Central Washington University, recently hit the road again with singer-songwriter Mary Lambert for Heart on my Sleeve, Lambert’s first headlining tour.</p><p>On Tuesday, Thomas was behind the drums and providing backup vocals during a live performance of Secrets on Good Morning America. The song is the opener on Lambert’s new album Heart on my Sleeve, released the same day.</p><p><a href="http://www.cwu.edu/cwu-alumna-tour-singer-songwriter-mary-lambert" target="_blank">See the video here</a></p>CWU Musicians in Korea!http://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3495Mon, 03 Nov 2014 09:17:41<p>String professors Carrie Rehkopf (violin), John Michel (cello), Tim Betts (viola), and Jon Hamar (bass) were joined by string alumni Michelle Vaughn, Rachel Nesvig and Vanessa Moss (violins), Jessica Jasper (viola), and Casey Felt (cello) on a trip to South Korea in October.&nbsp; They, along with current CWU student oboist David Hershfeldt were invited by Dr. Eduard Zilberkant to join him and the Fairbanks Symphony for a three concert engagement at the 3rd Gumi International Music Festival.&nbsp; Maestro Zilberkant regularly performs with the CWU's Kairos String Quartet, as well as with other CWU faculty members.&nbsp; He also performed Rachmaninov's 3rd Piano Concerto with the University Symphony Orchestra several years ago.</p><p><a href="http://cwu.edu/music">CWU Music</a></p><p><img alt="" src="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/images/CWUinKorea.jpeg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;"></p>C. Farrell Fine Arts And Research Scholarshiphttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3490Fri, 24 Oct 2014 11:18:13<p>This scholarship is available to Sophomore, Junior, and Senior students at Central Washington University who are pursuing a fine arts project in Art, Music, Theater, or Creative Writing, or who are pursuing a research project pertaining to the History, Geology, Archeology of Kittitas Valley. This scholarship provides one year of in-state tuition, $200 book allowance, and project costs. Please see their website for more information.</p><p><a href="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/documents/Award%20Description%20Guidelines%20and%20Application%20%282%29.doc">C. Farrell Fine Arts and Research Scholarship</a></p><p>This scholarship is not distributed by the Department of Music.&nbsp; Please see the website for deadlines, requirements, and eligibility.&nbsp; http://www.cwu.edu/scholarships/</p><p><br><a href="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/documents/Award Description Guidelines and Application (2).doc"><img alt="Musician Scholarship" src="/music/sites/cts.cwu.edu.music/files/images/C%20Farrell%20Music_0.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 345px;"></a></p>Guest Pianist to Perform at CWUhttp://www.cwu.edu/music/node/3489Mon, 20 Oct 2014 12:55:28<p>Pianist, Ning An will give a guest piano recital on October 22, at 7 p.m. in the McIntyre Music Building Concert Hall.&nbsp; A world renowned pianist, Ning An will perform a demanding program of works by Beethoven, Berg, Rachmaninoff and Chopin.&nbsp; His New York recital was praised in the New York Concert review for “the almost sculpted clarity of his playing, and his ability to maintain balance and tension in large-scale dramatic forms.” The event is free and open to the public.</p>