CWUNewsNewshttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/newsen-us"The Living Room," A New CWU Exhibithttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2713Tue, 03 Apr 2018 08:52:09<p><img alt="&quot;The Living Room&quot; Exhibit" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/Orleman_A%5B2%5D%5B2%5D.JPG" style="width: 650px; height: 243px; margin: 3px;">Ellensburg photographer Rob Fraser has taken many photographs of living rooms, sometimes for magazines, other times for real estate sales. In his mind, these pristine, fashionable spaces were missing something, however: the “living.”</p><p>In January 2017, Fraser began photographing the everyday messes and day-to-day routines of living rooms within the community. Hope Amason, Central Washington University anthropologist and Museum of Culture and Environment director, was interested in helping. She accompanied Fraser in order to interview home owners and living-room occupants.</p><p>The resulting project, <em>The Living Room</em>, is the newest exhibit at the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment (MCE), opening Thursday, April 5 at 5:30 p.m.</p><p>The public is invited to revel <em>The Living Room</em> with Fraser and Amason, along with MCE staff and community members featured in the exhibition. There will be refreshments and live music from Ellensburg band Cadence, who were photographed practicing in a band member’s living room.</p><p><em>The Living Room</em> uses a social science method called “cultural inventory,” which combines photographs and interviews in order to understand people in a particular time and place.&nbsp; While Amason interviewed participants, Fraser took photographs.</p><p>Visitors to the exhibit will be able to explore Fraser’s large, colorful panoramas of local living rooms, getting a glimpse of everyday life in our community.&nbsp; And they can also read interview excerpts that reveal the hidden stories behind seemingly mundane living-room objects.&nbsp;</p><p>Fraser and Amason are looking for more living rooms to feature in the exhibit as it continues into fall quarter 2018.&nbsp;<em>The Living Room</em> will be at the MCE through December 8, 2018—though due to staffing, the Museum is only open by special request from June 13 to September 15, 2018.</p><p>For more information visit www.cwu.edu/museum or email museum@cwu.edu, or call the gallery at 509-963-2313. The MCE is free and open to the public Wednesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.&nbsp; Parking on CWU campus is free after 4:30 p.m. and on Saturdays.</p><p><em><strong>Above Photo:</strong></em> <em>Jane Orleman's living room, owner of the well-known Dick and Jane's Spot. Photo by Rob Fraser.</em></p><p>Media Contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p>CWU's Puzzle Room Hopes to Draw More Students to its Museum of Culture and Environmenthttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2712Wed, 21 Mar 2018 10:10:38<p>Students from a local university have created an event which allows people to solve puzzles and unlock clues to a mystery.</p><p>Central Washington University’s Museum of Culture and Environment has a new puzzle activity that was created by students from different majors from math to anthropology.</p><p>The students developed a puzzle room, which is similar to an escape room.</p><p>Read entire article <a href="https://www.yaktrinews.com/news/cwus-puzzle-room-hopes-to-draw-more-students-to-its-museum-of-culture-and-environment/717418388" target="_blank">online at KVEW TV</a>.</p><hr><p><strong>CWU Video:</strong> Creating a Puzzle Room at the Museum</p><p><iframe class="youtube-player" frameborder="0" height="390" name="Puzzle Room at the Museum" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LZgQmlOOuk4?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%"></iframe></p></hr>Race, Class, Culture and the History of Hip-hop in the Northwesthttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2711Thu, 01 Mar 2018 08:23:12<p><img alt="Sir Mix-a-Lot in Concert" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/Sir%20Mix%20a%20Lot.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 427px; margin: 3px;"><br>From its beginnings in 1979, to Sir Mix-a-Lot's "Posse on Broadway" to Macklemore, Northwest hip-hop has been informed by local history as well as the diversity that defined the scene.</p><p>Central Washington University's Museum of Culture &amp; Environment and Humanities Washington have partnered to bring Ellensburg a dialogue on hip-hop in the Northwest, at 5:30 p.m. on March 1, in the Dean Hall lobby.</p><p>Author and professor Daudi Abe will discuss how Northwest hip-hop is a living document of our region's social and political movements, styles, and ideologies, and how it embodies a unique sense of community.</p><p>The history behind not only the Northwest's Grammy-winning rappers, but its world champion break dance crew, its internationally read hip-hop magazine, the producers who collaborated with some of the biggest names in music, its world-renowned clothing designers, and the grassroots organizations dedicated to community service and education will be discussed.</p><p>Abe is a Seattle-based professor, writer, and historian who has taught and written about culture, race, gender, education, communication, hip-hop, and sports for more than 20 years. He is the author of the book <em>6 'N the Morning: West Coast Hip-Hop Music 1987-1992 &amp; the Transformation of Mainstream Culture</em> and <em>From Memphis and Mogadishu: The History of African Americans in Martin Luther King County, Washington, 1858-2014</em>, at BlackPast.org.</p><p>His work has appeared in <em>The Stranger</em> and <em>The Seattle Times</em>, and he has appeared on national media such as MSNBC and <em>The Tavis Smiley Show</em>. Abe holds an MA in human development and a PhD in education from the University of Washington. His forthcoming book is <em>Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle</em>.</p><p>Parking on the CWU campus is free after 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. For more information, contact the <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum/" target="_blank">Museum of Culture &amp; Environment</a> at <a href="mailto:Museum@cwu.edu">Museum@cwu.edu</a> or (509) 963-2313.</p><p><strong>About Humanities Washington</strong><br><img alt="Humanities Washington Logo" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/Humanities-WA-logo-high-rez.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 65px; float: left; margin: 3px;">Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org.</p><p><strong>About the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau</strong><br>Speakers Bureau is one Humanities Washington's oldest and most popular programs. A roster of 31 cultural experts and scholars provides low-cost, high-quality public presentations across the state, encouraging audiences to think, learn and engage in conversation. These diverse and engaging speakers cover a variety of topics, including popular culture, photography, architecture, literature, food, film and history. Best of all - these presentations are free and open to the public. For more about Speakers Bureau, visit www.humanities.org/programs/speakers.</p><p><em>Photo: Andrew Mager via Flickr</em></p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, Dawn.Alford@cwu.edu.</p></br></a href="mailto:Museum@cwu.edu"></br></br>"Property of…" A Discussion About Street Art, Free Speech, and the Right to Public Spaceshttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2708Mon, 12 Feb 2018 16:36:32<p>What is public, what is private, and how do we define "free speech"? These and other questions <img alt="&quot;Property of...&quot; Poster" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/PropertyOf_Poster.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 387px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 3px; float: right;">surrounding property rights and free speech will be the topic of a public conversation on Thursday, February 15 at 5:30 p.m. in the Dean Hall lobby.</p><p>Central Washington University's exhibition, Rewriting the Streets: The International Language of Stickers, on display at the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment (MCE) through March 10, raises important questions about street art, the boundaries between public/private property, and the larger public sphere.</p><p>CWU and the community are invited to engage in a roundtable discussion that delves into the issue of "rights" of individuals versus the public. This event features an interdisciplinary panel composed of faculty members from across Central, including Xavier Cavazos (English), Cynthia Mitchell (communications), Chuck Reasons (law and justice), Rodrigo Renteria-Valencia (anthropology), and Elvin Delgado (geography).</p><p>Attendees will interact with panelists on a wide range of topics, from legal concerns about street art to current debates about free speech. There will be many opportunities to ask questions and take part in the conversation.</p><p>Given recent controversies surrounding free speech and the right to access public spaces, this discussion is both timely and conducive to bridging political and cultural divides.</p><p>The Museum of Culture &amp; Environment is located in Dean Hall at 1200 Wildcat Way. Parking is free on the CWU campus after 4:30 p.m. For more information about this and other MCE events, please contact museum@cwu.edu.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, Dawn.Alford@cwu.edu.&nbsp;</p>International Political and Social Street Stickers Subject of Next CWU Exhibithttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2706Thu, 21 Dec 2017 11:13:56<p><img alt="Paper Bullets Exhibit" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/Paper%20Bullets.jpg" style="width: 650px; height: 433px; margin: 3px;">Street stickers are moving beyond stop signs and dumpsters, into the spotlight where they aregaining appreciation for their simple form but powerful social commentary in exhibits and art galleries.</p><p>Works of international sticker artists will be shown in a dual exhibition at the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment (MCE) at Central Washington University from January 4 through March 10, 2018.</p><p>More than 1,600 street stickers from around the world—both historic and contemporary—will be on display in <em>Rewriting the Streets: The International Language of Stickers</em> and <em>Paper Bullets: 100 Years of Political Stickers from Around the World</em> exhibits. The exhibits will be accompanied by 41 artist statements and numerous text panels providing a deeper understanding of the work.</p><p>“There’s something mischievous about them [street stickers] which people respond to—it’s fun and slightly edgy, stickers are a very democtratic art form,” said exhibit curator Catherine Tedford.</p><p><em>Rewriting the Streets</em> will give visitors insight into the many different types of street stickers, from those poking fun at conventional notions of art to those offering passionate critiques of economic inequality, racism, sexism, and invasions of personal privacy.</p><p>A second exhibition, <em>Paper Bullets</em>, focuses exclusively on political stickers, dating from the early 1900s to today.&nbsp; From I.W.W., Industrial Workers of the World, stickers from the 1910s to protests over the U.S. Vietnam War, these political stickers were a way for activists to spread the word about important issues.</p><p><iframe class="youtube-player" name="Rewriting the Streets and Paper Bullets" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qkP7DDJ6WWk?rel=0" title="YouTube video player" type="text/html" width="100%" height="390" frameborder="0"></iframe></p><p>Tedford, describes one of her favorite contemporary stickers as not being graphic, just text based, but how it made her stop in her tracks to think. The sticker reads:&nbsp; “What have you done to make things better?”</p><p>“That’s what stickers are, they are simple but they carry very powerful messages.”</p><p>Catherine Tedford and Oliver Baudach have collected thousands of street stickers. Tedford, gallery director at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, writes about stickers in a blog, Stickerkitty. Baudach recently founded Hatch Kingdom, a Berlin museum devoted to stickers. Together they curated these two traveling exhibitions.</p><p>Some of the stickers were curated from the back of stop signs, bike racks, and other public spaces. While many are new and were acquired from collectors and other sources.</p><p>As a form of graffiti, stickers are an accessible art form: affordable or even free, and relatively easy to make and display. The stickers that appear on city streets are made for many different reasons: to offer commentary or critique about social issues, to promote websites or products, or to protest against the many advertisements that permeate our everyday lives—on trains, billboards, and even our clothing.</p><p>“Even though there may not be an active street or sticker scene (compared to large metropolitan cities) where [CWU] is geographically, 95 percent of your students that walk in with laptops or skateboards, I’d bet they have stickers on them,” Tedford said.</p><p><em>Rewriting the Streets and Paper Bullets</em> will be on display from January 4 to March 10, 2018, in the MCE, located on the first floor of Dean Hall at 1200 Wildcat Way.</p><p>For more information, visit the museum website at cwu.edu/museum, email museum@cwu.edu, or call the gallery at 509-963-2313. The MCE is free and open to the public Wednesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Parking on CWU campus is free on Saturdays.</p><p><strong>Photo: </strong><em>Street Artist Shepard Fairey's framed stickers exhibited in the CWU Museum of Culture &amp; Environment.</em></p><p>Media Contact: Dawn Alford, Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p>Caring for Your Treasures Workshop December 5http://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2705Fri, 17 Nov 2017 10:04:48<p>Do you have a family heirloom or a fragile object you want kept preserved for years to come?</p><p>The Museum of Culture and Environment (MCE) at Central Washington University is holding a <img alt="Old camera with photographs" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/family%20heirloom.jpg" style="width: 275px; height: 183px; float: right; margin: 3px;">free workshop on Tuesday, December 5 from 5-7 p.m. in Dean Hall to teach proper object care.</p><p>“Caring for Your Treasures” Workshop will teach how to safeguard quilts, photographs, plastic toys, and any other keepsake. Participants are encouraged to ask questions about their personal treasure as they learn ways to extend the life of historic and important artifacts.</p><p>The workshop will be lead by the MCE collections manager Lynn Bethke. Light refreshments will also be provided.</p><p>For more information, email MCE director J. Hope Amason Amason@cwu.edu or Lynn Bethke Bethkel@cwu.edu, or visit the MCE website at www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>Media Contact: Dawn Alford, Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.<br>Monday, November 13, 2017</p></br>Museum Examines Climate Change in the Pacific Northwesthttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2703Tue, 07 Nov 2017 08:52:47<p>From wildfires to increasing snowmelt, the Pacific Northwest is likely to experience major ice<img alt="Ice" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/ice.png" style="width: 250px; height: 229px; margin: 3px; float: right;"> formationsclimate transitions. Central Washington Universty professors Susan Kaspari and Megan Walsh will discuss what climate change means for those of us who call the Pacific Northwest home during a lecture on November 14, at 5:30 p.m. in the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment.</p><p>Kaspari and Walsh teach in the geological sciences and geography departments, respectively. Their presentation, “Fire and Ice in the Pacific Northwest,” will explain how their research helps to envision the future of climate change in the Pacific Northwest by looking into the past.</p><p>Kapsari’s research examines the impact of black carbon--commonly referred to as soot--on the melting rates of glaciers and seasonal snowpack. Walsh’s research explores how ancient charcoal deposits can help us understand past fire activity. Taken together, their work uncovers the complicated relationship between humans, fire, ice, snow, and climate change.</p><p>“Fire and Ice in the Pacific Northwest” is the first in a series of talks on climate change research that will take place throughout the 2017-2018 academic year.</p><p>The presentation will take place in the Dean Hall lobby at the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment. This event is free and open to the public. Parking is available on the&nbsp; O-5 lot behind Dean Hall, located on Wildcat Way, and is free to the public after 4:30 p.m. on weekdays and during weekends.</p><p>For more information on this lecture or future events, visit the <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum/home" target="_blank">Museum of Culture &amp; Environment website</a> or email museum@cwu.edu.</p><p>Media contact: Dawn Alford, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, Dawn.Alford@cwu.edu.</p><p>Monday, November 6, 2017</p>Caring for Your Treasures Workshop Planned for Saturday 10/14http://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2699Wed, 11 Oct 2017 21:57:05<p>Do you have a family heirloom or a fragile object you want kept preserved for years to come?<img style="margin: 3px; width: 200px; height: 134px; float: right;" alt="Student examining a basket" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/baskets.jpg"></p><p>The Museum of Culture and Environment (MCE) at Central Washington University is holding a free workshop on Saturday, October 14 at 10:30 a.m. in Dean Hall to teach proper object care.</p><p>“Caring for Your Treasures” Workshop will teach how to safeguard quilts, photographs, plastic toys, and any other keepsake. Participants are encouraged to ask questions about their personal treasure as they learn ways to extend the life of historic and important artifacts.</p><p>The workshop will be lead by the MCE collections manager Lynn Bethke. Light refreshments will also be provided.</p><p>For more information, email MCE director J. Hope Amason Amason@cwu.edu or Lynn Bethke Bethkel@cwu.edu or visit the MCE website at www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>Media Contact: Dawn Alford, Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p>Two New Exhibits at the MCE: Pulling Back the Curtain and Our Changing PNWhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2698Wed, 27 Sep 2017 09:03:15<p><img alt="Artifacts" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/Pulling%20back%20the%20curtain.jpg" style="width: 650px; height: 375px; margin: 3px;"><br><br>The Museum of Culture and Environment (MCE) at Central Washington University starts fall quarter with two new exhibits:&nbsp; <em>Pulling Back the Curtain</em> and <em>Our Changing Pacific Northwest</em>. Both exhibits open Thursday, September 28, with a 5:30 p.m. reception.</p><p>Why can’t you touch the artifacts in museum exhibits? And why do museums hide most of the objects they own? <em>Pulling Back the Curtain</em> is an interactive exhibit that explores the mysterious rituals that take place behind the scenes at museums.</p><p>Take a look behind the curtain from September 28 to December 9, 2017.</p><p><em>Our Changing Pacific Northwest</em>, brings into focus a central concern: how climate change is caused by humans—by asking, “How will climate change impact our region?” To answer this, the exhibit features the work of two CWU professors--Susan Kaspari of geology and Megan Walsh of geography--whose research into the past helps uncover what the future may hold.</p><p>This year-long exhibit is in a window display called “Window on Central,” facing the public hallway.</p><p>All are invited to attend the reception at 5:30 p.m. in the Dean Hall lobby, in front of the Museum of Culture &amp; Environment.&nbsp; Refreshments will be served. Students and curators will also be present to discuss their work and explain how they created their exhibitions.</p><p><strong>Museum Background</strong><br>The Museum of Culture and Environment is located on the first floor of Dean Hall. Admission is always free and regular visitation hours, during the academic term, are Wednesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.&nbsp; Parking on the CWU campus is free on weekends and after 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.</p><p>For more information, email Amason@cwu.edu or Bethlkel@cwu.edu, or visit the MCE website at www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>Media Contact: Dawn Alford, Public Affairs, 509-963-1484, dawn.alford@cwu.edu.</p></br></br></br>Jessica Mayhew reflects on chimpanzees and the things they carryhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2685Mon, 10 Apr 2017 06:12:53<p><a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum/dr-mayhew-chimpanzees-and-objects">Read Dr. Jessica Mayhew's commentary on objects carried by two chimpanzees residing in Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest</a></p>