CWUNewsNewshttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/newsen-usCWU Grad Picked for Smithsonian Museum Internshiphttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2589Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:39:20<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Hanna Person" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/Firefighter_gloves_January_2014_1.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 267px; margin: 5px;"></p><p>Hanna Person, who graduated this month from Central Washington University with a degree in anthropology, is headed to Washington, DC for a paid summer internship at the <a href="http://naturalhistory.si.edu/" target="_blank">Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of Natural History</a>.</p><p>Person, who’s always been a natural history buff, chose CWU because of its anthropology program and museum studies minor and because she wanted to attend a small school. In addition to her classes, Person participated in a five-day field course at Mount Rainier and assisted in multiple exhibit installations at CWU’s <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum/" target="_blank">Museum of Culture and Environment</a>. She says the experiences helped her land the Smithsonian internship, as did the great recommendation from Mark Auslander, professor of anthropology and museum studies and director of the CWU museum.</p><p>“She's extremely hard working, very creative, and takes a good deal of initiative,” Auslander said about Person. When he learned the Smithsonian might be looking for an intern to help organize its Rastafarian collection, he didn’t hesitate to recommend Person to Jake Homiak, director of the collections and archives program at the Museum of Natural History.</p><p>“Internships like this at the Smithsonian are extremely competitive, but my museum studies colleagues and I had no doubt that Hanna would be a very strong candidate,” Auslander said. “We are just thrilled for Hanna.”</p><p>Person will help register and accession the museum's collection of global Rastafarian material culture, working under Homiak, a noted scholar of Afro-Caribbean religions.</p><p><strong>'A quiet adventure'</strong></p><p>“I realize that, for most people, being in the back room and handling the objects is pretty boring. But for me it’s interesting,” Person said. “It’s a little mystery. You’re learning about the object, you’re handling it; it’s like a treasure hunt. A quiet adventure.”</p><p>Person was an intern at CWU’s Museum of Culture and Environment under collections manager Lynn Bethke, who said Person’s work and the work of other interns is vital to the operation of the museum.</p><p>“Hanna is a great student—always ready to take on new challenges, but also detail oriented; great attributes for anyone interested in museums,” Bethke said.</p><p>Person helped in multiple CWU exhibit installations, “writing text, mounting panels, installing objects, and doing all of the many little things that go into making an exhibit come to life,” Bethke said. “She also did a great deal of work processing a collection of baskets from the Philippines which was donated to us in 2012.”</p><p>The Museum of Natural History is right on the National Mall in the heart of the capital. Person hopes to visit as many museums as she can during her six-week stay in Washington, DC, and expects the experience to give her a better feel for museum collection and help her decide what sort of graduate studies she wants to take part in.</p><p>Person is a 2012 graduate of La Center High School and, thanks to Running Start, finished her four-year degree at CWU in just two years.</p><p><em><strong>PHOTO: </strong>Recent CWU graduate Hanna Person is pictured in the past exhibit "Where there's Smoke ... Living with Fire," at the Museum of Culture and Environment. T<em>he exhibit borrowed g</em>ear worn by wilderness firefighters <em>from the state Department of Natural Resources</em>. Person says her experience working at the CWU museum helped her land a paid internship at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC this summer.</em></p><p><strong>Media contact: </strong>Barb Arnott, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-2841, <a href="mailto:barnott@cwu.edu">barnott@cwu.edu</a></p><p>June 25, 2014</p>CWU Museum exhibit How did the Cougar Cross the Road? opens April 17http://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2583Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:06:09<p>April 8, 2014</p><p>ELLENSBURG, Wash. — Central Washington University’s Museum of Culture and Environment will host an opening reception for its latest exhibit,<em> How did the Cougar Cross the Road? Restoring Wildlife Passages at Snoqualmie</em> Pass, at 5:30 p.m. April 17.</p><p>Refreshments will be served as visitors explore the brand new exhibit that tells the story of wildlife connectivity corridors linking animal populations formerly divided by Interstate 90. Follow in the footsteps of native fauna over a recreated wildlife overpass and discover how the cougar crosses the road, and how humans are helping.</p><p>A series of speakers including Yvonne Prater, author of <em>Snoqualmie Pass: From Indian Trail to Interstate</em>; Al Aronica (Kittitas Band of the Yakama Nation), Brian White (WSDOT), Jason Smith (WSDOT) and Patti Davis-Darda (USFS) will discuss their knowledge and research concerning the history of Snoqualmie Pass and its wildlife passages. For more information, go to www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>The Museum of Culture and Environment is at CWU on the first floor of Dean Hall, 1200 N. D St., in Ellensburg. The museum is open 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Parking is free on the CWU campus after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends. For more information, email Museum@cwu.edu or call 963-2313.</p><p>Press contact: Sarah Jane Johnson, Central Communication Agency, 253-350-7322, johnsonsar@cwu.edu</p>CWU Museum Hosts Salmon Run and Earth Day Family Festivalhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2582Tue, 08 Apr 2014 09:02:11<p>The Museum of Culture and Environment will be holding its second annual Salmon 5K/10K Run and Earth Day Family Festival on April 19 at Central Washington University.</p><p>The Salmon Run celebrates the life of our favorite anadromous fish and will offer 5K and 10K routes, as well as a kids small fry dash. Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the race starts at 10 a.m. For more information visit the <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum/salmonrun2014">Salmon Run registration page.</a></p><p>The Earth Day Family Festival is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in and around Dean Hall at CWU. The festival is free and offers a wide variety of entertaining and educational activities for all ages, including strawberry DNA testing, a Peruvian dance performance, face painting, and a mock archaeology dig. Document shredding also will be available, and people can bring in their unused prescription medications as part of the Drug Take-Back program.</p><p>The first 150 attendees will be served free Winegars ice cream. The Earth Day Family Festival also will provide an opportunity to view the museum’s newest exhibit, “How Did the Cougar Cross the Road?” which explores the wildlife corridors that are linking animal populations formerly divided by Interstate 90. Follow in the footsteps of wildlife over a recreated animal overpass and discover how the cougar crosses the road, and how humans are helping.</p><p>Earth Day participating organizations:</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Campus Garden Coalition<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; CWU Greenhouse<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; CWU Police and Parking Services<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kittitas County Community Network<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kittitas County Public Health Department<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kittitas County Sheriff’s Office<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kittitas County Solid Waste<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Primate Awareness Network<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Public Health and Pre-Nursing Club<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Puget Sound Energy<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; RSVP and Volunteer Center of Kittitas County<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Troupe Rose Belly Dancers<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; TusuyPeru Peruvian Dance Performers<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Wanapum Native Discovery Unit<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Washington State Department of Ecology<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner, SHIBA Program<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Waste Management<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Washington Water Trust</p><p><br>The Salmon Run and the Earth Day Festival are sponsored by the Museum of Culture and Environment, University Recreation, Yakama Nation Fisheries, Pizza Colin, Waste Management, Kittitas County Solid Waste, The Gym, and the Recycle Shop.</p><p>The Museum of Culture and Environment is at CWU on the first floor of Dean Hall, 1200 N. D St., in Ellensburg. The museum is open 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Saturday. Parking is free on the CWU campus after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends. For more information, email Museum@cwu.edu or call 963-2313.</p>Panel at CWU Museum Weighs in on Wolveshttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2580Thu, 20 Feb 2014 15:48:52<p>February 20, 2014</p><p>Ellensburg, WA — Chances of spotting a wolf in the state of Washington are growing as the number of wolves and confirmed wolf packs rapidly increases, according to a 2012 survey by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.</p><p>Wolves play a critical role in promoting a healthy ecosystem. However, they also can cause trouble for cattlemen and for big game hunters.</p><p>Central Washington University’s Museum of Culture and Environment is sponsoring a panel discussion on the complicated issue of Washington wolves at 5:30 p.m. February 27 in Dean Hall. The panel will feature speakers with diverse viewpoints:</p><p style="margin-left: 40px;">• Jay Kehne, an outreach associate with Conservation Northwest<br>• Lee Davis, a local hunter and past president of Kittitas County Field and Stream<br>• Scott Becker, a wolf biologist with the WDFW in Wenatchee<br>• Sam Kayser, Ellensburg rancher and president of the Kittitas County Cattlemen's Association</p><p>Audience discussion will be encouraged during what is expected be a lively discussion. The event is held in conjunction with the museum’s exhibit Wolves in Washington State, which was organized by the Burke Museum, University of Washington, in consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.</p><p>The Museum of Culture and Environment is at CWU on the first floor of Dean Hall, 1200 N. D St., in Ellensburg. The museum is open 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Parking is free on the CWU campus after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends. For more information, contact Museum@cwu.edu or call 509-963-2313.</p><p>Visit the WDFW website for a map of wolf observations in Washington state.</p>Relations Between Neanderthals and Early Modern Humans Discussed at CWU Museumhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2578Fri, 07 Feb 2014 11:47:54<p>February 6, 2013</p><p>Ellensburg, WA — Ever wonder if you have a little Neanderthal in you? Joe Lorenz, a biological anthropologist from Central Washington University’s Department of Anthropology and Museum Studies, will discuss relationships between Neanderthals and anatomically modern Homo sapiens on Thursday.</p><p>Lorenz will explore whether Neanderthals and early modern humans interbred during his presentation<em> Love in the Time of the Pleistocene</em> at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, February 13 at CWU’s Museum of Culture and Environment in Dean Hall. He will explain what is known about the complicated and intimate relations between Neanderthals and early modern humans, just in time for Valentine’s Day.</p><p>The free event is held in conjunction with CWU’s Darwin Week. Other free Darwin Week events include:</p><p style="margin-left: 40px;">• A presentation by Jennifer Dechaine, <em>Epigenetics: A New Dimension to Understanding Disease, Behavior, and All that Makes You, You,</em> noon Monday in Science, room 147.</p><p style="margin-left: 40px;">• A presentation by David Darda, <em>Oddball Anatomical Structures and the Stories They Tell: The Governor of the Testes</em>, noon Tuesday in Science, room 101.</p><p style="margin-left: 40px;">• Keynote speaker and book signing by Lixing Sun, <em>The Fairness Instinct: The Robin Hood Mentality and Our Biological Nature</em>, 7 p.m. Wednesday in Science, room 147. Darwin’s birthday cake will be served after the talk.</p><p style="margin-left: 40px;">• A presentation by Dominic Klyve, <em>Darwin vs. Mendel: The Historical Grudge Match for the Soul of Biology</em>, noon Thursday in Science, room 147.</p><p>For a full list of Darwin Week events go to www.cwu.edu/biology/darwin-week-2014.</p><p>Parking at CWU is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in specially designated spaces and lots assigned to residence halls.</p><p>Media contact: Elizabeth Bollwerk, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, 509-963-2313, bollwerke@cwu.edu</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/museum/sites/cts.cwu.edu.museum/files/images/Joe%20Lorenz%20TalkWEB.jpg" style="width: 496px; height: 383px;"></p>Museum Welcomes Wolf Exhibithttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2577Tue, 28 Jan 2014 08:42:15<p><strong>Wolves in Washington State Joins Where There’s Smoke at MCE</strong></p><p><em>CWU museum features Wolves in Washington State</em></p><p>January 21, 2014<br>Ellensburg, WA – A new exhibit at the Museum of Culture and Environment at Central Washington University, <em>Wolves in Washington State</em>, introduces visitors to the state’s unique history with wolves.</p><p>The MCE will host an opening reception for Wolves and introduce new stories for the current exhibit,<em> Where There’s Smoke . . . Living With Fire</em>, at 6:00 p.m. January 30 in Dean Hall.&nbsp; Come enjoy refreshments provided by Ellensburg WineWorks and learn how fire and wolves impact Washington State’s culture and environment.</p><p>The exhibit will explore everything from the wolf’s importance to Pacific Northwest Native American culture to the state’s new wolf management plan. A complex story, the exhibit examines wolf ecology and management issues in addition to highlighting the critical role wolves play in promoting a healthy ecosystem.</p><p>The exhibit features a touchable wolf skull cast, touchable comparative species tracks, and a take-away brochure of frequently asked questions. <em>Wolves in Washington State</em>—a traveling exhibit from the Burke Museum, Seattle—is on view at MCE in Dean Hall from January 30–April 13.</p><p>The MCE is on the first floor of Dean Hall at CWU, 1200 N. D St. The MCE is open Wednesday through Friday 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Parking is free on the CWU campus weekdays after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends. For more information, contact Museum@cwu.edu or call 509-963-2313.</p><p><em>Wolves in Washington State</em> was organized by the Burke Museum, University of Washington, in consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.</p>Journalists Talk About the Dangerous Work of Covering Fire at MCEhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2576Tue, 28 Jan 2014 08:39:52<p>Journalists Talk About the Dangerous Work of Covering Fire at MCE</p><p><br>January 21, 2013</p><p><br>Ellensburg, WA – When most people see a fire their instinct is to run the opposite direction.&nbsp; But a reporter’s job demands they get closer to the story, no matter how dangerous.&nbsp; How do reporters cover difficult and dangerous stories?&nbsp; What decisions have to be made and how?&nbsp; Come find out at Covering Fire: The Journalists and the Taylor Bridge Fire at 5:00 p.m. January 30 in Dean Hall, room 104, at Central Washington University.&nbsp;</p><p><br>During the roundtable, journalists who covered the 2012 Taylor Bridge Fire—which burned more than 23,000 acres between Cle Elum and Ellensburg—will explain how they did it. The informal discussion also will give attendees a chance to ask questions about what it’s like to cover a fast-moving and complicated story.&nbsp;</p><p><br>The free event is sponsored by the Museum of Culture and Environment and is open to the public. It is held in conjunction with MCE’s winter exhibit, Where There’s Smoke . . . Living with Fire. For more information please visit www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>Parking at CWU is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in specially designated spaces (handicapped, loading) or lots assigned to residence halls.</p><p>Media Contact: Elizabeth Bollwerk, Museum of Culture and Environment, 509-963-2313, bollwerke@cwu.edu</p>MCE Presentation Reveals the Power of Touchhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2553Wed, 08 Jan 2014 12:16:12<p>MCE Presentation Reveals the Power of Touch</p><p>January 7, 2013</p><p>Ellensburg, WA – In an age where computers and the Internet reign supreme, the sense of sight is often deemed more important than the sense of touch. Kojiro Hirose, from the National Museum of Ethnology in Osaka, Japan, disagrees with this hierarchy, arguing that there are important aspects of the world humans cannot understand without tactile learning. Dr. Hirose will talk about his research into the value of touch during his presentation “Hands of a Goze [blind female musician]: The Tactile Culture of Visually-Impaired People in Modern Japan” on January 21, at 5:30 p.m. in Dean Hall at CWU’s Museum of Culture and Environment.</p><p>This event is free and open to the public and is held in conjunction with MCE’s winter exhibit, Where There’s Smoke . . . Living with Fire. For more information go to www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>Parking at CWU is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except in specially designated spaces (handicapped, loading) or lots assigned to residence halls.</p><p>Media Contact: Elizabeth Bollwerk, Museum of Culture and Environment, 509-963-2313, bollwerke@cwu.edu</p>Paleoecologist Dr. Megan Walsh to Speak at Museumhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2550Wed, 30 Oct 2013 14:15:19<p>(Ellensburg, WA – October 31, 2013) CWU Geography professor Megan Walsh, Ph.D. will give a talk entitled “Climatic and Human Influences on the Fire History of the Pacific Northwest" at CWU’s Museum of Culture and Environment (MCE) in Dean Hall on Thursday, November 7th at 5:30pm.&nbsp;</p><p>Dr. Walsh’s talk will discuss how climate events and Native American land management practices have affected the frequency of fire and its impact on the landscape of the Pacific Northwest.&nbsp; This event is free and open to the public and is held in conjunction with MCE’s new exhibit “Where There’s Smoke… Living with Fire”.</p>Museum partners with Ellensburg Public Library for Book Clubhttp://www.cwu.edu/museum/node/2549Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:54:52<p>The Museum of Culture and Environment has partnered with the Ellensburg Public Library to create the new Museum-Library Book Club.&nbsp; The Club's first book will be Richard Wrangham's <em>Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human</em>.&nbsp; A discussion of the book will be held at the Ellensburg Public Library on Thursday, Dec. 5 at 7:00 p.m.</p><p>The book is available for purchase at the Wildcat Shop on the CWU campus.&nbsp; This event is being held in conjunction with the MCE's exhibit <em>Where there's Smoke... Living with Fire.</em>&nbsp; The MCE is located in Dean Hall on the CWU campus, 1200 N. D Street. The Museum’s hours are Wednesday through Friday 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.&nbsp; Parking is free on the CWU campus after weekdays after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends.&nbsp; For more information, please contact Museum@cwu.edu or call (509)-963-2313.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>