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Museum

Current Exhibits


Cougar crosswalk sign

How did the Cougar Cross the Road? Restoring wildlife passages at Snoqualmie Pass

April 17 - December 6, 2014

This exhibit that tells the story of wildlife connectivity corridors linking animal populations formerly divided by Interstate 90. Follow in the footsteps of native fauna over a recreated wildlife overpass and discover how the cougar crosses the road, and how humans are helping.

Visitors may take an audio tour of this exhibition on their mobile phones.

In addition, visitors may take a student-developed audio tour of campus art and architecture.

Migration Now

September 24 - December 6, 2014

A selection of handmade prints addressing migrant issues from Justseeds & CultureStrike.

Migration is a phenomenon, not a problem, something that simply is. The right to migrate and to move freely is our human right. When societies restrict or choke off the movements of their citizens, they end up doing the work of a dam- they generate power and control floods, but in doing so they destroy life and wreck the surrounding space.

We want to re-imagine migration as an inevitability, as a social practice that is not to be prevented but to be related to, like weather. All migration starts with social relationships. When people move, they are going either towards their families or communities, or more often, away from them. They move to help their relatives, or support them by leaving. People migrate because their homes stifle them, because those homes become burdens they need to shed in order to have full lives. They move in search of opportunity, or to escape their past, or to simply survive. They move because of lies they are told and that they come to believe, and they move to fulfil the most beautiful and fragile of dreams. Migration is fundamentally about our right to move freely across planet Earth, in search of our fullest and best selves.

 

The Wenas Creek Mammoth

Ongoing - Dean Hall Lobby
 
Thousands of years ago, a mProfessor Pat Lubinski Stands next to a life sized mammoth imageammoth was buried in the hillside near the Wenas Creek in Selah, WA. In 2005, its remains were discovered and a team from Central Washington University, headed by Pat Lubinski, began the careful process of removing the bones from the hillside. The Wenas Creek Mammoth exhibit in the MCE lobby and Window On Central display exhibit explores what the team found and what they have found out about the mammoth. The exhibit features real mammoth bones in the display case.