CWUNews FeedNews Feedhttps://www.cwu.edu/math/newsen-usMath Offers Path to Dating Success, CWU Professor Sayshttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2758Tue, 25 Feb 2020 17:15:06<p><img alt="Jean Marie Linhart" src="https://www.cwu.edu/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/JeanMarieWeb.png" style="margin: 0px 0px 30px 30px; float: right; width: 20%;" />When do you know that you have found your life partner? CWU math professor <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/math/jean-marie-linhart" target="_blank">Jean Marie Linhart</a> will discuss her premise that math holds the key to a successful dating life at the next Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminar.</p> <p>The free, public presentation is scheduled for Wednesday, February 26, at 4:00 p.m. in Samuelson Hall 252.</p> <p>&ldquo;One of the reasons we date is because we want to find a long-term partner,&rdquo; said Linhart. &ldquo;One of the questions we have to ask is when do we decide we&rsquo;re with the right person so that we&rsquo;re going to stop dating and we&rsquo;re going to settle down with somebody.&rdquo;</p> <p>To help quantify that timetable, Linhart will outline the Optimal Stopping Theory, which addresses the problem of choosing a time to take a particular action. Linhart will discuss how it can offer a strategy for finding the best romantic match, regardless of age, ethnicity, or any other delineating category.</p> <p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s the great thing about math; it&rsquo;s pretty universally applicable,&rdquo; Linhart added. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m looking at existing work, but looking at it in a different context.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Linhart will also review the Stable Marriage Algorithm, which won its founders a 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics. Linhart has developed a way to use the algorithm for easy-to-follow tips for dating success.</p> <p>&ldquo;I teach the Stable Marriage Algorithm in one of my classes,&rdquo; Linhart explained. &ldquo;I was teaching this algorithm and thinking about what the algorithm says in terms of [a person&rsquo;s] dating life; and, I thought, there is actually a really practical message here.&rdquo;</p> <p>So practical, in fact, that Linhart says she sees it manifested in her own long-term relationship.</p> <p>&ldquo;I have actually found some of the advice from my talk to be very on point,&rdquo; she admitted, with a laugh.&nbsp;</p> <p>-30-</p> <p><strong>Media contact: </strong>Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p> CWU Seminar to Explore Link Between Math Concepts and Evolutionary Theoryhttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2756Tue, 14 Jan 2020 14:14:32<p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><img alt="Math Explains the Living World image" src="https://www.cwu.edu/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/Math%20World.jpeg" style="margin: 0px 0px 30px 30px; float: right; width: 25%;" />Mathematics may hold the key to understanding how the earth was formed and life developed&mdash;or at least that&rsquo;s what <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/biology/">CWU biology </a>professor <a href="https://www.cwu.edu/biology/dr-alison-scoville">Ali Scoville</a> believes.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Scoville will discuss how &ldquo;Math Explains the Living World&rdquo; during the first in CWU&rsquo;s winter quarter Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminar series. &nbsp;Scheduled for Wednesday, January 15, at 4:00 p.m. in Samuelson 252, on the Ellensburg campus, it is free and open to the public.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">In her presentation, Scoville will explain how mathematical concepts could increase understanding of the connection between microevolution, which is short-term evolutionary change occurring within a single species or population, and macroevolution, long-term evolution above the species level.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">&ldquo;A [mathematical] framework has been derived that, I think, has a lot of potential for connecting those two areas,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;The basic idea is to allow us to incorporate what we already know about non-linear developmental processes into our theoretical understanding of evolution. For me, that&rsquo;s really exciting.&rdquo;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">&ldquo;I will give a fair amount of background on how math is used in basic evolutionary theory,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Then I will go into this new development and how it works mathematically.&rdquo;&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Scoville specializes in conservation biology, ecological and evolutionary genomics, and rapid evolution.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &ldquo;My research students study a range of questions in the area of ecological and evolutionary genomics [function, mapping, and structure of an organism&rsquo;s genetic code],&rdquo; she noted. &ldquo;We use a combination of field work, molecular tools, and mathematical modeling, with an emphasis on rapid evolution and conservation biology.&rdquo; &nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Scoville points out that a number of CWU math and computer science students conduct research and work on interdisciplinary projects with their biology peers.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">-30-</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Media contact: </span></span></b><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, director of Radio Services and Integrated Communications, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</span></span></span></span></p> </span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-size:12pt"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="color:black">CWU Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminar to Offer a Clue to Winning at Board Gameshttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2755Mon, 28 Oct 2019 16:34:26<p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><img alt="Aaron Montgomery, CWU mathematics professor" src="https://www.cwu.edu/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/MontgomeryAaron.jpg" style="margin: 0px 0px 30px 30px; float: right; width: 35%;" />Popular worldwide, deduction board games are those that require logic and reasoning in order to win. Examples include competitive games such as the venerable Battleship and Clue and the more recent game Cryptid; as well as modern cooperative games such as Hanabi and The Shipwreck Arcana.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Aaron Montgomery, CWU mathematics professor, will explain how deductive reasoning is used to develop winning strategies in these games in CWU&rsquo;s next Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminar.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&ldquo;I will review some previous work done by other mathematicians who are also looking into finding optimal strategies for Hanabi,&rdquo; Montgomery notes, &ldquo;as well as some of my own ideas about how to develop winning strategies specifically for The Shipwreck Arcana.&rdquo;</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Montgomery, a past winner of the &ldquo;Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics Award&rdquo; from the Pacific Northwest section of the Mathematical Association of America, has a wide range of acknowledged expertise, including game theory. </span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">His free, public presentation is part of the fall quarter seminar series sponsored by the CWU Department of Mathematics. It will be held Wednesday, October 30, at 4:00 p.m. in Samuelson 252 on the Ellensburg campus.</span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">-30-</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Media contact:</span></span></b><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, director of Radio Services and Integrated Communications, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:normal"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Photo: </span></span></b><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Aaron Montgomery, CWU mathematics professor</span></span></span></span></span></p> </p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt; margin:0in 0in 10pt"></span style="font-size:11pt"></span style="line-height:normal"></span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"></span style="font-size:12.0pt"></span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Mt Stuart Math Seminars Winter quarter 2020https://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2749Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:27:43<p><strong>Mt Stuart Math Seminars for Winter quarter 2020 Samuelson 252 4PM<br /> When&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Title&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Presenter</strong></p> <p>Jan 29&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Cyptanalysis of the Hill Cipher&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Stuart Boersma<br /> Feb 12&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sex, Drugs, Rock &quot;n&quot; Roll, and New Math&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Peter Klosterman<br /> Feb 256&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Math and Dating&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Jean Marie Linhart</p> <p><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Virtual Reality Discussed at CWUhttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2742Mon, 05 Nov 2018 13:41:50<p>Historically, learning has been accomplished in four ways: through seeing, hearing, speaking, and doing. That is now changing, because of virtual reality (VR). One of the world leaders in VR is Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland.</p><p>A United States Department of Energy national laboratory, it employs a team of computer scientists and graphic artists partnering with subject matter experts to create new software experiences that build upon those traditional learning methods, through computer-generated experiences contained within simulated environments.</p><p>A CWU alumnus, who is now on staff at PNNL, will discuss his specific efforts during the next Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminar. Titled “Virtual Reality for Science, Security, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Education,” the free, public presentation will be held Wednesday, November 7, at 4:00 p.m. in Samuelson 104.</p><p>“We think virtual reality is one of the best ways to see, explore, and share experiences, data, and ideas that lead to enhanced understanding,” said Nick Cramer, a 2001 CWU alumnus and, now, PNNL VR software engineer.</p><p>His presentation will focus on how PNNL is creating virtual reality experiences for science, security, and education.</p><p>Joining Cramer at CWU will be Russ Burtner, a 1993 CWU graduate and a laboratory Senior User Experience Research Scientist; and 2016 CWU alumna Alexa Williams, PNNL Staffing Coordinator, who oversees student internships and outreach, during the presentation.</p><p>They will all be available to discuss PNNL employment and internships available from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. and 1:15 to 3:00 p.m. in Samuelson 225. They will also be available during a pizza lunch, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Samuelson 212.</p><p><strong>Media contact:</strong> Robert Lowery, Department of Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, Robert.Lowery@cwu.edu</p><p>&nbsp;</p>CWU Fall Mathematics Seminars Begin September 26https://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2738Wed, 26 Sep 2018 07:38:31<p><img alt="" src="/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/images/mathematics%20seminar.jpg" style="width: 259px; height: 194px; margin-left: 4px; margin-right: 4px; float: right;">Curious about mathematical modeling? Virtual reality? Check out the fall 2018 Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminars beginning September 26.<br>&nbsp;<br>“Our first seminar is a meet and greet,” said Jean Marie Linhart, mathematics professor and organizer of the seminars. “In addition, several of our students who did interesting research programs and internships over the summer will bring a slide or two describing what they did, how they found out about the opportunity, and how to apply.”</p><p>Linhart is especially excited about the November 7 seminar. CWU alumnus Nick Cramer, from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, will give a presentation on virtual reality. Cramer will be visiting with another CWU alumnus, Russ Burtner, who is working in the same area. In addition, Alexa Williams, who is from PNNL human resources, and oversees student internships and outreach, will provide information about internship and employment opportunities for CWU students and graduates. They will be available throughout the day to meet with interested students and faculty.</p><p><br><strong>Mount Stuart Mathematics Seminars Fall 2018<br>When &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;What? &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Who?</strong><br>Sept 26 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Meet and Greet: What We Did This Summer &nbsp; &nbsp;CWU Mathematics Community<br>Oct 10 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Mathematical Modeling with M&amp;Ms &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Jean Marie Linhart<br>Oct 24 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Student Presentations &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; CWU Mathematics Students<br>Nov 7 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Virtual Reality for Science, Security and &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Nick Cramer, PNNL,<br>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;STEM Education &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;CWU Alumnus<br>Nov 28 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Poster Session &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;CWU Mathematics Students</p><p>All seminars will be held at 4:00 p.m. in Samuelson 252. Refreshments will be served.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>&nbsp;</p></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br>CWU Math Professor Contributes to National Science Foundation STEM Efforthttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2737Mon, 27 Aug 2018 08:08:25<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/images/Linhart%20Math%20workshop.png" style="width: 475px; height: 356px;"></p><p>Jean Marie Linhart, Central Washington University mathematics professor, was one of only 20 participants selected for a curriculum development workshop at Manhattan College in Riverdale, New York. Linhart was part of an international cohort that developed materials to support methods of teaching differential equations.</p><p>Linhart created a project that explores ballistics modeling; specifically how different models of air resistance change the theoretical trajectory of an object, comparing theory with experimental data.</p><p>“The project I worked on involved modeling the trajectory of a sponge dart,” said Linhart. “Students can inexpensively collect their own data, and then use mathematics to see how different mathematical models of air resistance change the theoretical trajectory of the dart, and how well theory matches up with the data.”</p><p>Participants experienced new activities for teaching with real world scenarios through presentations and teaching experiences. They investigated applying mathematics to such areas as biology, chemistry, economics, and engineering. Through peer review, conversations, and quiet time devoted to writing, participants produced innovative teaching materials for online publishing and distribution.</p><p>The organization, SIMIODE (Systemic Initiative for Modeling Investigations and Opportunities with Differential Equations), sponsored the week-long workshop to support using modeling in teaching differential equations, a pivotal STEM (science, technology, education, math) course in the undergraduate curriculum. SIMIODE is a National Science Foundation funded effort in support of a learning community at www.simiode.org.</p><p>DEMARC (Differential Equations Model and Resource Creators) is an NSF-sponsored developer workshop for faculty to participate in a challenging and invigorating faculty development opportunity.</p><p>Photo: Linhart is in the third row, to the right of the man in navy, yellow and white stripes.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p></br>Bitcoin Pricing, Pika Populations, and Ebola Research Presented at First Central Convergence Symposiumhttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2736Thu, 02 Aug 2018 13:44:33<p><img alt="" src="https://www.cwu.edu/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/images/Central%20convergence%20pic-2.jpg" style="width: 475px; height: 327px;"></p><p>A group of mathematics students have participated in national and local Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs) as part of a $29,671 National Research Experience for Undergraduates Program grant from the Mathematical Association of America at Central Washington University.</p><p>The grant supported six students—four from CWU and two from Heritage University—from groups underrepresented in mathematics, to work for seven weeks on epidemiology and biological population modeling research projects.</p><p>The students will be sharing their research findings at the first Central Convergence Symposium, hosted by the Department of Mathematics and the College of the Sciences. The symposium will be held August 8, from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Science II, Room 301. It features four, half-hour student talks on mathematical topics such as bitcoin price formation, pika population modeling, and ebola epidemiology modeling.&nbsp; The grant-funded students will be presenting with others including a CWU College of the Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) grant and a National Science Foundation REU participant.&nbsp; A reception at noon will follow. The university community is invited to attend.</p><p>“This grant lets students know that they have a place in math and in research,” said Brandy Wiegers, CWU mathematics professor and co-organizer of the 2018 REU. Wiegers, along with fellow mathematics professor and co-organizer Sooie-Hoe Loke, also mentored students in their research activities.</p><p>“It was rewarding to work with such talented individuals, who were extremely focused and dedicated to their research projects.”</p><p><br><strong>Photo:</strong> <em>Back row (l to r):</em> Dr. Brandy Wiegers, Aliyah Pana (grey shirt), Irene Jimenez (red shirt), Jesus C. Lopez (grey shirt), Jiovanna Lamas (grey shirt), Dr. Sooie-Hoe Loke<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <em>Front row (l to r):</em> Amber Jefferson (black shirt), Macarena M. Santillan (grey shirt)</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>&nbsp;</p></br></br>Talented Math Student Enthused about Graduation and What Lies Beyondhttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2725Mon, 14 May 2018 06:10:25<p><img alt="" src="/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/images/2018%20Lisa%20Charron.JPG" style="width: 200px; height: 300px; margin-left: 4px; margin-right: 4px; float: left;">Lisa Charron, a soon-to-be Wildcat alumna, doesn’t just talk about math—she <em>enthuses</em> about it. According to her professors, she is an exceptional student who has taken on every challenge the actuarial science program has to offer, with a gusto that is infectious not only to her fellow students but also to her instructors.</p><p>Actuarial science is a discipline that assesses financial risks in the health, insurance, and finance fields, using mathematical and statistical methods.</p><p>“I first got into math in the Running Start program [at Yakima's AC Davis High School],” Charron said. “My teacher, Carolyn Schut, suggested that actuarial science might be a good career choice."</p><p>Charron, who transferred here from Yakima Valley College in fall 2015 with an associate’s degree through Running Start, took to the program with alacrity.</p><p>“I transferred here as a junior, and decided to slow down a little bit to get a more rounded education,” she continued. To balance and complement her mathematics curriculum, Charron took finance, computer science, and economics courses.</p><p>In three years at CWU, she has taken all of the courses for an actuarial science major plus an additional year of senior-level coursework. She has completed minors in finance and economics, served as president of the Actuarial Science Club, and passed three of the rigorous professional exams from the Society of Actuaries—all with a near 4.0 GPA at CWU. Charron was honored for her scholarship at the College of the Sciences Awards Banquet on May 3.</p><p>“I really enjoy it. It’s rewarding how challenging it is,” Charron said. “You have to study nine months straight to pass one exam.”</p><p>To be certified as an actuary, one must past a series of rigorous exams. In the CWU program, students usually make headway by passing one or two before graduation.</p><p>“Three exams down and three to go,” she grinned. “The pressure is off a little.”</p><p>It was her extra diligence that gained her a job offer after graduation. Lisa will be joining the international consulting firm, Milliman Inc., in Seattle.</p><p>“It’s an actuarial firm, you know, nerds that consult other nerds,” she laughed.</p><p>“I came to Central because it was close to home, and had one of the most esteemed actuarial programs on the West Coast. And not having to pay out-of-state tuition was a big plus, too.”</p><p>Lisa is the daughter of renowned Yakima architect Nancy Charron, of Traho Architects, PS. Lisa’s sister Monica will also walk the boards on Saturday, graduating with a degree in Food Science and Nutrition.</p><p>When she’s not computing risks, or checking statistics, you can find Lisa hiking or rock climbing, usually with her golden retriever, Autumn.</p><p>“Being at Central has been amazing, and I loved all my classes,” Charron beamed. “My teachers let me shine and be as enthusiastic as I wanted.”</p><p><em>CWU's Actuarial Science Program is the only major program offered in the State of Washington and one of very few on the US West Coast. It is ranked as an advanced undergraduate program by the Society of Actuaries.</em></p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>&nbsp;</p>2018 Kryptos Challenge Attracts Participants from Around the Worldhttps://www.cwu.edu/math/node/2716Wed, 18 Apr 2018 11:13:21<p><img alt="" src="/math/sites/cts.cwu.edu.math/files/images/kryptos.jpg" style="width: 441px; height: 114px;"></p><p>The annual International Kryptos Challenge, hosted by the Central Washington University Department of Mathematics, boasted 143 participants, forming 61 teams. They represented colleges, universities, and schools from throughout the United States, including Arizona, California, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. Students from Canada and France also participated.</p><p>“We continue to have a lot of interest in this event,” said Stuart Boersma, professor and chair of mathematics, and co-founder of the Kryptos Challenge. Boersma has been running the challenge since 2011.</p><p>The contest centers on the breaking, or cryptanalysis, of secret writing, or ciphers. Each challenge presents contestants with a brief scenario together with an encoded message—ciphertext. The goal is to discover the original English plaintext message. This year, participants decrypted puzzling personal ads, unscrambled an intriguing invitation, and broke up a fictional internet trolling ring. The challenge was developed by Boersma, and his colleague, Cheryl Beaver, a Western Oregon University mathematics professor.</p><p>The first-place team, from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, finished in just under 20 hours.</p><p>“I think the problems were a little more challenging this year,” Boersma said. “But the main objective is to have fun. Most students with a little familiarity with ciphers or code-breaking can solve the challenges. They aren’t overly technical, nor do they use advanced mathematical algorithms.”</p><p>The contest is sponsored by the Pacific Northwest section of the Mathematical Association of America and is held every April. The 2018 challenge was held April 5 through April 9. For more information, go to www.cwu.edu/math/kryptos .</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p>