CWUNewsNewshttp://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/newsen-usCWU Welcomes New Group of Students from Koreahttp://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2804Fri, 24 Jan 2014 11:29:25<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Marilyn Levine, Central Washington University's provost and vice president for Academic and Student Life, speaks with a group of Korean students in her office." src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/Provost%20welcomes%20Korean%20students%2092.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 267px; margin: 5px;"></p><p>Hyung Min Kim, who goes by Justin, is among a group of 14 students from South Korea that recently arrived at Central Washington University.</p><p>“People are so friendly,” Kim said about the CWU community. “The professors are so passionate.”</p><p>Kim plans to study mechanical engineering and eventually work in the aerospace industry. He hopes to land an internship with Boeing.</p><p>Kim and the rest of his cohort will finish their four-year degrees at CWU as part of the school’s new 1+3 agreement with Chung-Ang University in Seoul, South Korea. The agreement was arranged through the KORUS (Korea-US) Education Institute.</p><p>Chung-Ang University is much busier than CWU, said Kim, who described the Ellensburg campus as cozy and peaceful. He learned English as a 6-year-old thanks to his father’s passion for the language and for studying abroad. “My family loves for me to have a new challenge,” Kim said.</p><p>As part of the 1+3 program, qualified Korean students spend the first year of college in their home country and then finish the last three years in the United States. While studying in Seoul, the students take classes equivalent to CWU general education courses and English as a Second Language courses to prepare them for studying in American classrooms. The arrangement eases their transition to Ellensburg and helps set them up for success.</p><p>“The Korean students help diversify our campus,” said Mike Launius, assistant vice president for International Studies and Programs. “Upping the international exposure is good for all our students and faculty. It’s a real advantage for students in Ellensburg to study alongside people from all over the world. That’s who they’ll be working with and competing with [after college].”</p><p>The 14 Korean students arrived at CWU on January 3 and are in various fields of study, including accounting, theater arts, aviation, marketing, business, education, and psychology.</p><p>“We like that—they’re headed for a wide variety of programs,” Launius said. The students will benefit from a welcoming campus and small-class personalized attention at CWU, he added.</p><p>Marilyn Levine, CWU’s provost and vice president for Academic and Student Life, greeted the students in her office last week. Together they sang a Korean soccer song and enjoyed homemade cookies.</p><p>“It is a special honor and a special joy to welcome you,” Levine told the group. “I am very excited to see you.”</p><p>Levine visited the KORUS office and traveled to Seoul to help arrange the 1+3 agreement between CWU and Chung-Ang University. Launius, who speaks Korean, helped recruit Chung-Ang University students to come to CWU. Bang-Soon Yoon, professor and chair of the CWU Political Science Department, also met with Chung-Ang University students and their parents about the program.</p><p>International students pay full out-of-state tuition of about $19,400 per year. They support the local economy by shopping at Ellensburg businesses.</p><p>Through the program, Korean students gain a global edge by completing their undergraduate work in the United States. They learn English at the native speaker’s level and attain worldwide networking skills.</p><p>“Our goal in bringing them here is to help them succeed,” Launius said. “They’re pretty courageous to make the trip. Their lives will never be the same.”</p><p>The value of studying abroad is being realized more every year. During the 2012-13 academic year, schools in the United States enrolled a record number of international students—819,644 throughout the country, according to the Institute of International Education.</p><p>Washington State is ranked 11th in the nation in terms of its number of foreign students. The state hosted 22,877 foreign students who spent an estimated $643 million statewide in 2013.</p><p>“Washington State is probably one of the most heavily impacted states when it comes to global economics,” Launius said, noting that Ellensburg’s agriculture industry relies heavily on exports. “Our economy, even here in Ellensburg, is connected to trans-Pacific trade.”</p><blockquote><p>To watch KO-AM TV's story about this program, <a href="http://www.koamtv.net/">click here</a> and look for the Jan. 24 broadcast.</p></blockquote><p><em><strong>Photo:</strong> Marilyn Levine, Central Washington University's provost and vice president for Academic and Student Life, speaks with a group of Korean students in her office. (Rich Villacres / CWU)</em></p><p><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 1.4;"><strong>Media contact: </strong>Barb Arnott, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-2841, Barnott@cwu.edu</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 12px; line-height: 1.4;">January 24, 2014</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p>Asian Correspondent Touts CWUhttp://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2801Wed, 05 Jun 2013 07:32:26<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/CWU%20Medallion-2.jpg" style="width: 299px; height: 299px; "></p><p>Central Washington University in the northwest United States combines hands-on learning and world-class research to produce internationally leading science programs. Classes are small – alarmingly so for a US public university. Cavernous lecture halls are not part of the student experience here. In fact, the average class holds a mere 25 students.</p><p>Read more from the Asian Correspondent <a href="http://asiancorrespondent.com/108412/central-washington-university/">here</a>.</p>Passages Newsletter - Winter 2011http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2723Wed, 13 Jun 2012 10:48:12<h3 style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/passages.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 74px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid;"><br><br>Telmuun Bayarsaikhan - Honor student from Mongolia</h3><p><strong>Abstract: </strong></p><blockquote><p><strong><em>"It gives me a great pleasure to introduce myself. My name is Telmuun Bayarsaikhan and I am an international student from Mongolia who is studying at Central Washington University, and this is my 3rd year at CWU!"</em></strong></p></blockquote><p>Telmuun studied at the Russian Embassy School for ten years in Mongolia. He had always been a capable student, very active in all fields of school activities. As a class monitor for 6 years, he had to develop good communication, teamwork, and problem solving skills to organize and fund-raise for his school activities. He really enjoyed working with large groups of people.</p><p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/telmuun.png" style="width: 500px; height: 346px; "></p><p>In 2007, Telmuun had successfully finished a high school exchange program in the United States. He graduated from Montesano Jr-Sr High School with excellence and became the senior honor student. During this time, Telmuun lived with an American host family for one academic year in Montesano, WA. That was the first big step for him to set his goals and "to begin the road that will lead me".</p><p>It was interesting and great for Telmuun to live with a new family as an exchange student. His host family was the Berry's and Telmuun describes them as wonderful people. He had two host brothers, Sean (20) and Mike (17) and they had a lot of fun doing activities together (like skiing, hiking, kayaking, traveling and more). Telmuun really enjoyed his experience at Montesano Jr-Sr High School. He made a lot of good friends and learned a lot. He also really enjoyed playing on the basketball team for his high school.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/winter11passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read full newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/winter11passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Winter%2711_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p><p>&nbsp;</p>Passages Newsletter - Fall 2010http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2722Wed, 13 Jun 2012 10:34:02<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Fall_Passages_header.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 70px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;">From Lahore to Ellensburg - Quratulain Mansur</h3><p><strong><em>Abstract:</em></strong></p><p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Q_Mansur.jpg" style="width: 250px; height: 144px; padding-right: 7px; padding-bottom: 7px; float: left;">Quratulain had just found out a few days ago that she was the only Pakistani at Central Washington University. Having spent over two years studying and working in the United Kingdom (UK) where there was a significant number of Pakistanis, it felt a little strange. “I almost felt like the rare and elusive snow leopard, one of the treasured animals of Pakistan,” she said. It had been an interesting journey from the bustling metropolitan of Lahore to quiet, sleepy Ellensburg. She had never thought that she would ever be able to come here. Getting a visa for the USA from Pakistan is very difficult and only a few make it.</p><p>Quratulain (Anne) Mansur was very excited when asked if she was interested in writing about herself for "Passages". There was a lot to tell but she didn't where to start. Being an international student from Pakistan, she thought to being by telling a few things about where she was from.</p><p>Pakistan is an amazingly beautiful country. It is perhaps a little bigger than Texas but has immense cultural and geographic diversity. It is not all gloom and doom as the world media portrays it. The Northern areas of Pakistan are breathtaking and home to some of the highest mountain ranges like the Himalayas, Karakoram and the Hindu Kush. The Karakoram Range has the second highest peak in the world.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/fall10passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here&nbsp;to read the full newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/fall10passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Fall%2710_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p>Passages Newsletter - Winter 2009http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2719Tue, 05 Jun 2012 13:31:11<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Winter_Passages_Header%2009.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 74px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;"><strong>Vietnamese Aviation Program Celebrates at CWU</strong><br><strong>By: Michael Launius, Executive Director</strong></h3><p><strong><em>Abstract:</em></strong></p><p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/vietnam-aviation.jpg" style="padding-right: 10px; float: left; width: 200px; height: 249px; ">The first cohort of 30 Vietnamese students studying aviation maintenance completed their program at CWUlast quarter and held their degree completion ceremony on March 20, 2009. This program is a joint project of CWU’s<br>Department of Aviation, American Pacific University (APU) in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), and Vietnam Airlines (VNA). Also integral to the successful implementation of this program are the College of Education and Professional Studies, theOffice of Continuing Education, and the Office of International<br>Studies and Programs.</p><p>The completion ceremony was held at the SURC<br>Theater and attended by the graduates, family and friends from Vietnam, fellow students, official delegates from APU and VNA, and CWU faculty and staff. Provost Wayne Quirk, CEPS Interim Dean Connie Lambert, Aviation Department Chair Amy Hoover, APU student Hieu Le Nguyen, APU President Binh Thy Ngyugen Tran and VNA Training Director Nguyen Thi Minh Ha spoke at the completion ceremony about the importance of this project in terms of building bridges to provide professional training, enhanced cross-cultural understanding, and improved international cooperation between Vietnam and the United States.</p><p>A second, smaller group of ten VNA/APU aviation students started their program this Spring quarter. In addition to the aviation students, we have also received seven additional matriculated students who are not majoring in aviation from APU this academic year. Congratulations to all the students, faculty, and staff who have helped make this important program such a rousing success!</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/winter11passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read the full newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/winter09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Winter%2709_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p>Passages Newsletter - Spring 2009http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2718Tue, 05 Jun 2012 13:29:47<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Spring_Passages_header%2009.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 73px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;">World Languages Day<br>By: Josh Nelson, Chair, Department of Foreign Languages</h3><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/world_flags.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 164px; padding-bottom: 7px;"></p><p><em><strong>Abstract:</strong></em></p><p>The Department of Foreign Languages sponsored its 8th World Languages Day on May 8th. Over 280 high school students arrived on campus from as far away as Oroville<br>just below the Canadian border, to Kamaiakin High School in the Tri-Cities. The first hour consisted of a plenary session in the Concert Hall in the music building in which students and faculty from the CWU Russian and Music programs sang and danced to Russian music (provided by a small orchestra composed of their own members). There was also a speech by Tatiana Khainovskaya, an exchange student from Belarus on the importance of studying language and culture. After that, the high schoolers fanned out over campus to attend various small break-out workshops and lectures. The following is an inclusive list of presentations: American Sign Language, Belly<br>Dancing, Cambodia and Viet Nam, Japanese Abacus, Jorge the Gila Monster, 1st Year French, Simple Cyrillic, Japanese Noh Theatre Utai Chanting, the language and culture of Iran, and Japanese Culture Through Media.</p><p>The entire group then came together in Nicholson Pavilion’s dance studio to learn the merengue under the tutelage of Therese Young. Then at noon there was a barbeque lunch on the east patio of the Student Union Recreation Center. There were displays sponsored by exchange students from the Office of International Studies and Programs. Saudi Arabia, Korea, and Japan were represented at these tables.</p><p>For the first time this year, the day’s activities were extended by two hours into the early afternoon with two large group sessions which were held in Science and Dean Halls. Dr. Terry McCain described his experience as a Peace Corps volunteer in Honduras, while Dr. Ralf Greenwald described his research into the role of the brain in human language via his presentation: “The Brain and Language: A Tale of Two Hemispheres.”</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/spring09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read the full&nbsp;newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/spring09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Spring%2709_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p>Passages Newsletter - Summer 2009http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2708Mon, 04 Jun 2012 13:09:09<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Summer_Passages_header_09.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 71px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;">A Year Abroad in Krakow, Poland - Lydia Tang</h3><p><strong><em>Abstract:</em></strong></p><p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/lydia-tang.jpg" style="width: 263px; height: 167px; padding-bottom: 7px; float: right;padding-left:7px">In Lydia’s senior year, she felt like she had a choice of two paths, to return to the circus ring of auditions for graduate school, or to test her training and launch into the professional freelance life of a violinist. At the time, neither were that appealing, so as fate would have it, she happened to log onto the study abroad website and search for music programs abroad – there was one for the Academy of Music in Krakow, Poland. Lydia had no particular draw to Poland, but did like the opportunity to study at a European conservatory.</p><p>Going to Poland was a huge shock from the very beginning. The language itself was completely foreign, she was lucky at least that it used the Roman alphabet and not Cyrillic. But three years of French in high school were no help with a Slavic language, where the word for her own instrument, violin, was skrzypce. Lydia tried to prepare by listening to Polish-on-tape courses from the library, which taught (her) to count to ten and say rudimentary phrases. Besides that, listening to her classmates speak Polish was kind of like Charlie Brown’s teacher – just noise, and trying to act a response based on the inflexion of their words. Her year abroad taught many lessons, not only about music, but as the only American at the Academy of Music, she had a unique immersion into Polish life, and as she traveled internationally on her own, she felt like she learned “smarts” and had a lot of time to examine her new life – views and actions.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/summer09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read the full&nbsp;newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/summer09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Summer%2709_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p><p>&nbsp;</p>Passages Newsletter - Fall 2009http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2707Mon, 04 Jun 2012 12:59:17<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Fall_Passages_header_09.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 71px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;">Kyung Dong University Sokcho, Republic of Korea<br>By: Dorothy Chase, Recreation and Tourism</h3><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/KDU-buddha-statue.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 185px; padding-bottom: 7px;"></p><p>If you would like to spend an interesting and very pleasant semester or more abroad, try spending a faculty exchange at Kyung Dong University. You would find yourself made very welcome indeed on the beautiful campus of Kyung Dong University.</p><p>Kyung Dong, founded in 1997, sits within a short walk of the East Sea, near the city of Sokcho (pop. 80,000) in Gangwo-do (province), northeastern Republic of Korea. The area is a seasonal domestic tourism destination with the most popular national park, Seoraksan, only ten minutes away. With the mountains, the sea, and a temperate four-season climate, it is a very pleasant place.</p><p>Of KDU's 3,000 students, 800 major in one of the three tourism specialities (hotel management; hospitality / food service; tourism interpretation). Next door to tourism is the sports marketing program, and I co-authored a peer-reviewed article with a faculty member there. In quick-quick Korean fashion, it took mere three months from first submission to the hard copy journal publication to arrive in my mailbox at CWU! Other KDU schools are management; security and police; computer and media engineering; education including secondary special education, and Korean language teaching; architectural civil engineering; and marine technology.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/fall09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read the full&nbsp;newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><strong><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/fall09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Fall%2709_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></a></strong></p>Passages Newsletter - Summer 2009http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2706Mon, 04 Jun 2012 12:50:07<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Summer_Passages_header_09.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 71px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;">A Year Abroad in Krakow, Poland - Lydia Tang</h3><p><strong><em>Abstract:</em></strong></p><p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/lydia-tang.jpg" style="width: 263px; height: 167px; padding-bottom: 7px; float: right;padding-left:7px">In Lydia’s senior year, she felt like she had a choice of two paths, to return to the circus ring of auditions for graduate school, or to test her training and launch into the professional freelance life of a violinist. At the time, neither were that appealing, so as fate would have it, she happened to log onto the study abroad website and search for music programs abroad – there was one for the Academy of Music in Krakow, Poland. Lydia had no particular draw to Poland, but did like the opportunity to study at a European conservatory.</p><p>Going to Poland was a huge shock from the very beginning. The language itself was completely foreign, she was lucky at least that it used the Roman alphabet and not Cyrillic. But three years of French in high school were no help with a Slavic language, where the word for her own instrument, violin, was skrzypce. Lydia tried to prepare by listening to Polish-on-tape courses from the library, which taught (her) to count to ten and say rudimentary phrases. Besides that, listening to her classmates speak Polish was kind of like Charlie Brown’s teacher – just noise, and trying to act a response based on the inflexion of their words. Her year abroad taught many lessons, not only about music, but as the only American at the Academy of Music, she had a unique immersion into Polish life, and as she traveled internationally on her own, she felt like she learned “smarts” and had a lot of time to examine her new life – views and actions.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/summer09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read the full&nbsp;newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/summer09passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Summer%2709_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p><p>&nbsp;</p>Passages Newsletter - Winter 2008http://www.cwu.edu/international-programs/node/2705Mon, 04 Jun 2012 12:42:55<p><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Winter_Passages_Header%2008.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 69px;"></p><h3 style="text-align: center;">CWU &amp; Vietnam Collaborate on Aviation Program<br>By: Launius, Executive Director</h3><p><strong><em>Abstract:</em></strong></p><blockquote><p style="text-align: center;">CWU has one of the few Aviation majors in the USA.</p></blockquote><p>At the beginning of Winter Quarter, 2008 CWU admitted 30 new students from Vietnam who are seeking BS degrees in Aviation Maintenance. These students are the first cohort in what is hoped to be a long series of such groups coming to us from a new Vietnamese exchange partner institution located in Ho Chi Minh City, formerly known as Saigon. That partner is America Pacific University, a new private university emphasizing coursework in English, an international curriculum, and the opportunity for Vietnamese students to study abroad – particularly in the United States.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/canoe-vietnam.jpg" style="width: 350px; height: 117px;"></p><p>This project was first initiated in 2003 as part of an agreement reached between the Boeing Company, Vietnam Airlines, America Pacific University, and South Seattle Community College (SSCC). Airlines throughout Southeast Asia are rapidly expanding<br>services and VNA is no exception. In the course of expansion VNA bought planes from Boeing to add to its fleet, but quickly found that it needed to dramatically increase qualified staff to fly and maintain their aircraft, hence the agreement to train ground staff in the US at SSCC. CWU entered the picture when VNA decided that they should go on to earn four-year degrees to complete their training. CWU has one of the few Aviation<br>majors in the USA.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/winter08passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Click here to read full newsletter</strong></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/documents/OISP/winter08passages.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><img alt="" src="/international-programs/sites/cts.cwu.edu.international-programs/files/images/OISP/Winter%2708_Passages_Thumbnail.jpg" style="border: 1px solid rgb(153, 153, 153); width: 120px; height: 155px; "></strong></a></p>