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IACUC

Section 2

LEGAL AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN ANIMAL RESEARCH

 

A. FEDERAL LAWS

CWU follows the guidelines established by the Public Health Service in its publication, Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals . Standards for laboratory animal husbandry, veterinary care, and physical plant (animal facilities and environments) meet those described by the Animal Welfare Act administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The latest editions of these publications are available for inspection at the office of Graduate Studies, Research and Continuing Education.

 

B. STATE LAWS

The Revised Code of Washington (RCW) contains statutes specific to the unlawful use and treatment of animals such as:

Chapter 16.52 RCW PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS

Chapter 9.08 RCW ANIMALS, CRIMES RELATING TO

Researchers should check for regulations specific to permits for field studies if intending that type of research.

 

C. ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

The U.S. Government Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research and Training (see Appendix B) provides the basic principles behind the current regulations.

In addition to these ethical principles, a number of scholarly disciplines and organizations offer specific ethical guidelines for the care and use of animals in research.

 

D. CWU ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH WITH ANIMALS

Researchers should familiarize themselves with state, federal, or institutional review requirements and the general principles for the ethical conduct of research with animals. A short summary of CWU's ethical principles is provided here.

(1) Central Washington University and the individual members of its faculty, staff, and student body recognize their responsibility to protect the welfare of animals in research and teaching.

(2) In considering a plan for research or education, the most appropriate approach shall be matched with the educational use or research objectives(s). When animals are included, the kinds and numbers shall be carefully matched with the specific aims of the protocol. When more than one species can be satisfactorily used, a major consideration shall be to choose the lowest species on the phylogenetic scale and the least sentient.

(3) A researcher will appropriately consider alternatives, using the "3 R's": replacement, or utilizing non-animal models; reduction, or using the minimum number of animals; and refinement , or elimination or reduction of unnecessary pain and distress in animals.

(4) Individuals responsible for the care of animals will be appropriately trained and have access to all necessary available resources.