CWUNewsNewshttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/newsen-usCWU Roundtable to Discuss the European Union’s Futurehttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2665Tue, 14 Nov 2017 14:47:52<p>The future of the European Union (EU) is the subject of a special roundtable discussion with three EU experts on Thursday, November 16 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Planetarium, Science II Building on the Central Washington University campus.</p><p>“With such events as the recent ‘Brexit’ vote in Great Britain and the financial crisis in Greece, it’s very timely to have a dialogue about the European Union and where it goes from here,” said program coordinator and CWU Political Science faculty member Eugen Nagy. “With that in mind, we’ve invited a panel of experts on this topic to discuss these issues at CWU.”</p><p>Following the discussion, which will be moderated by Prof Eugen L Nagy, there will a reception for the attending public to meet with the panelists. The event will be taped and broadcast later on TVW (www.TVW.org).</p><p>Panelists will include:</p><p>• Klaus Botzet, Minister Counsellor, Head of the Political, Security, and Development Section, Delegation of the European Union to the USA. Botzet is an experienced diplomat who has worked for more than two decades in the Foreign Office of the Federal Republic of Germany, and is an expert on the security dimensions of the EU.</p><p>• Kurt Hübner, Jean Monnet Chair for European Integration and Global Political Economy at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Canada. Hübner has served as the director of the Institute of European Studies at UBC for many years. As a specialist in the economic dimensions of the EU, the Euro, and European integration, he is both a reputed scholar and a much in demand speaker.</p><p>• Nico Lange, Director, Konrad Adenauer Foundation USA. After serving in the German federal armed forces in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo, he has worked for the Robert Bosch Foundation and the Adenauer Foundations in the Russian Federation, Ukraine, and Germany, while also teaching politics and international relations at various universities Among others, Lange is a specialist on the Eastern challenges facing the EU.</p><p>The roundtable is part of a two-week series of campus events focused on the EU, which were made possible through a generous grant from the German Information Center USA (through the Germany: Making Choices program), and with the support of CWU’s William O. Douglas Honors College.</p><p>The events are also sponsored by CWU’s Department of Political Science, World Languages and Cultures Department, Film Program and the Office of International Studies and Programs.</p><p>For more information about this roundtable and the other related events, connect with the program at www.facebook.com/EUatCWU, or contact Eugen Nagy at Eugen.nagy@cwu.edu. For accommodation email: ds@cwu.edu.</p>CWU Series Explores Germany and the European Unionhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2664Mon, 06 Nov 2017 09:22:38<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/Document22%20%281%29.jpg" style="width: 721px; height: 78px;"></p><p>Germany and the European Union are the focus of a two-week series hosted at Central Washington University from November 6-17. The events will focus on informing, debating, and discovering opportunities in and about Europe.</p><p>“Germany, the European Union, and the future of the EU, have gained considerable attention in recent years, so we’re extremely pleased to be able to bring these events to Central,” said event coordinator and CWU Political Science faculty member Eugen Nagy.</p><p>On November 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Student Union and Recreation Center (SURC) Ballroom, both the CWU and the local community are invited to attend the “Opportunities in Germany and the European Union” fair, to meet and network with organizations offering opportunities to learn, do, live—in the European Union.</p><p>“The fair is a unique chance to discover a variety of opportunities to study, do internships, cooperate, network, visit, and simply learn about Germany and the countries of the European Union,” Nagy explained. He noted that the fair is open to all, including students, faculty, local schools, non-profits, and the entire local community.</p><p>Additionally, participants are invited to attend a film festival with screenings on November 7, 8, 14 and 15 at 7:00 p.m. in Lind Hall 104, as well as a roundtable discussion on the future of the EU, featuring prominent EU speakers, which will be held on November 16 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. in the Science II Planetarium. For a schedule of the films, go to www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/eu-at-cwu.</p><p>All of the events are made possible through a generous grant from the German Information Center USA (through the Germany: Making Choices program), and with the support of CWU’s William O. Douglas Honors College. The events are also sponsored by CWU’s Department of Political Science, World Languages and Cultures Department, Film Program, and the Office of International Studies and Programs.</p><p>For information about the film screenings and other related events, connect with the program at www.facebook.com/EUatCWU , or contact Eugen Nagy at Eugen.nagy@cwu.edu. For accommodation email: ds@cwu.edu.</p>Acclaimed Foreign Films Spotlighted During Germany and the European Union Film Festivalhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2663Mon, 06 Nov 2017 09:21:08<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/Document22%20%281%29.jpg" style="width: 721px; height: 78px; margin: 3px;"></p><p>Four films, including the award-winning “Almanya: Welcome to Germany,” a charming story about three generations of Turkish immigrants in Germany, headline the Germany and the European Union Film Festival that will be held at Central Washington University between November 6-17.</p><p>The films touch on topics such as World War I, communist East Germany, and identity and immigration. All films will be screened in Lind Hall room 104 at 7:00 p.m., and are free and open to the public.</p><p>Film Festival Schedule</p><p>• November 7 – Joyeux Noël (PG-13)<br>In the middle of World War I, on Christmas Day, the warring sides stopped fighting, and joined each other, for a few moments of peace, friendship, communion. Why and how did this happen? This is their true story.</p><p>• November 8 – The Lives of Others (R)<br>When love meets the surveillance state: in communist East Germany, an agent of the secret police, conducting surveillance on a writer and his lover, finds himself becoming increasingly absorbed into their lives. What happens next will change all of them forever. * This film won the 2007 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film</p><p>• November 14 – Run Lola Run (R)<br>After a botched money delivery, Lola has 20 minutes to come up with 100,000 Deutschmarks - so she has to run. Action, passion, and innovative filmmaking fill this international blockbuster.</p><p>• November 15 – Almanya: Welcome to Germany (NR)<br>Experience this award-winning comedy-drama follows three generations of Turkish immigrants in Germany. * This film won the Deutscher Filmpreis&nbsp;in the categories Best Script and Best Film.</p><p>These film screenings, along with an opportunities in the EU fair (November 9 from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom) and a roundtable discussion on the future of the EU (November 16 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. in the Science II Planetarium), are made possible through a generous grant from the German Information Center USA (through the Germany: Making Choices program), and with the support of CWU’s William O. Douglas Honors College.</p><p>The events are also sponsored by CWU’s Department of Political Science, the World Languages and Cultures Department, the CWU Film Program and the Office of International Studies and Programs.</p><p>For information about the film screenings and other related events, connect with the program at www.facebook.com/EUatCWU, or contact Eugen Nagy at Eugen.nagy@cwu.edu. For accommodation email: ds@cwu.edu.</p></br></br></br></br>Migration: Rhetoric and Reality - DHC Spring Miniversityhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2645Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:41:57<p>Did you know that despite political rhetoric, immigrants from Mexico have a crime rate as low, and, in some research, lower, than non-immigrants. The U.S. Government has in more recent years treated the civil violations of immigration laws as criminal rather than purely civil. This “crimmigration” has been focused upon the Mexico/U.S. border, not the U.S. /Canada border.&nbsp; The history of U.S/Mexico border relations is important to understand to address the events and policies of today. Also, while the chaos and migration in the Middle-East is often presented as a consequence of non-state terrorism, nation-states in the Middle-East and elsewhere have been significant in creating the massive migration due to war and conflict. Join us in understanding these and other issues and possible solutions to these man made problems. May 9, 16, 23 and 30 at 5:30pm.</p><p>May 9<br>Dr. Susana Flores<br>"And Some, I Assume, Are Good People: An Immigrant Counterstory"</p><p>May 16<br>Dr. Gilberto Garcia<br>"Mexico-U.S. Immigration Policy: A Historical View"</p><p>May 23<br>Dr. Chuck Reasons<br>"Crimmigration: The Criminalizing of Immigrants"</p><p>May 30<br>Dr. Anne Cubilié<br>"Middle East Migration, War and Chaos"</p></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br>Megafires Explored at CWU Presentation October 18http://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2611Thu, 13 Oct 2016 10:24:41<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/scijinks_wildfire.png" style="width: 450px; height: 260px;"></p><p>Megafires—raging wildfires that consume 100,000 acres or more—are becoming more prevalent, especially in the West, according to researcher Paul Hessburg, of the Pacific Northwest Research Station and the University of Washington. He will speak on “Era of Megafires,” a mix-media presentation at Central Washington University at 7:00 p.m. on October 18, in Science II, room 103. The event is free and open to the public.<br>&nbsp;<br>Hessburg has conducted fire and landscape ecology research for more than 27 years. The presentation will consist of fast-moving, short, topic-based talks interspersed with compelling video vignettes. It features the work of wildfire photographer John Marshall.</p><p>“This is a phenomenal presentation about wildfire,” said Professor Susan Kaspari, CWU Geological Sciences. “Please join us if you are interested, and spread the word to people you think would be interested. This is very relevant for Kittitas County.”</p><p>The 70-minute multi-media travelling presentation is designed to educate audiences about wildfire, and the natural role it plays in the forest environment. It examines the part humans play in the wildfire equation and the significant increase in the incidence of megafires in the past decade. The presentation will also explore developing solutions to catastrophic fires.</p><p>A trailer for the presentation can be viewed here: http://www.north40productions.com/wildfire/.</p><p>CWU’s new Science II building is located near the Student Union Recreation Building, adjacent to the Japanese Garden. Attendees may enter through the northwest and southwest doors of Science II. Parking at CWU lots is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends except in specially marked spaces or in residence hall lots.</p><p>“Era of Megafires” is part of the “Hazards, Risk, and Resilience in the Pacific Northwest” course that Kaspari and Professor Anne Egger teach in the Douglas Honors College fall quarter.</p><p>The Cascadia Hazards Institute provided financial support for this event.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br></br></br>Mass Incarceration Addressed in Spring Miniversityhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2594Mon, 25 Apr 2016 10:16:27<p>Did you know the United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world? And that blacks and Latinos are greatly overrepresented among those under correctional supervision (probation/prisons/jails and parole)? Central Washington University’s Douglas Honors College Miniversity will explore how this situation evolved over the last several decades. The four-week symposia will address the policies and practices that created this problem and those that can help reduce this kind of racial injustice.</p><p>The course will meet the first four Tuesdays in May at 6:30 p.m. in Language and Literature building, room 103F. People may register online at www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/miniversity-home; there is no charge for this course. Register early, as space is limited. Parking in CWU lots is free after 4:30 p.m., except in specially marked spaces and in residence hall lots.</p><p>In this course, there will be four different speakers to address different facts of this complex problem.<br><br>May 3<br>Introduction to Mass Incarceration<br>Chuck Reasons, is a professor in CWU’s Law and Justice Department. In addition to a doctorate in sociology, Reasons also holds a law degree from the University of British Columbia Law School. Reasons specializes in law, criminology, criminal justice and minorities, crime, and comparative homicide between Canada and the United States.<br><br>May 10<br>Mass Incarceration and the Law<br>Teresa Divine is a lawyer, specializing in criminal and civil law and procedure, family law, and correctional law. She is also an associate professor and associate graduate faculty in CWU’s Law and Justice Department. Divine specializes in criminal and civil law and procedure, family law, and correctional law.<br><br>May 17&nbsp;<br>Mass Incarceration and Women<br>Mindie Dieu is associate dean for student achievement and a professor in CWU’s Department of English. She has taught courses in state prisons, and has written about her experiences with inmates.</p><p>May 24&nbsp;<br>Reducing Mass Incarceration<br>Roger Schaefer is a professor in the CWU’s Department of Law and Justice. His research interests include sex offender community supervision, correctional dynamics and discourse, and correctional program evaluation.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>4/25/16</p></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br>Gain Confidence in Your Writing: DHC Miniversity Features Essential English http://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2579Thu, 21 Jan 2016 13:41:08<p>Do the rules of grammar confound you? Would you like to feel more confident in your writing? Improve your communication skills with acclaimed English Professor Emeritus Gerald Stacy at the Douglas Honors College Miniversity. The winter symposium is “Their, They’re, There . . . It’s Only Grammar,” a four-week seminar designed to polish your grammar skills.</p><p>In this course, you will learn how to avoid the most common grammar errors, and become a more effective communicator. The course meets every Tuesday in February, beginning February 2, at 6:30 p.m. in the Language and Literature building, room 103. Parking in CWU lots is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, except for specially designated spaces and resident hall lots.</p><p>The course is $20, payable on the first day of class, by cash or check. Space is limited, so register early! Go to www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/dhc-miniversity-registration-0 to sign up today.</p><p><br><strong>Become a Douglas Honors College Renaissance Scholar!</strong><br>Are you curious about your world? Would you like to explore it with like-minded seekers, led by award-winning professors? Central Washington University’s William O. Douglas Honors College is hosting a series of four-week symposia designed to nurture your sense of wonder about the world.</p><p>Mark your calendars for the Spring Quarter Symposium, Mass Incarceration and Racial Justice, beginning in April.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p></br></br>$100,000 Coca-Cola Grant Helps CWU’s First Generation Students Complete Collegehttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2546Tue, 29 Sep 2015 12:55:34<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/cocacolafndtn_logo_2012.jpeg" style="width: 388px; height: 200px;"></p><p>Students who are the first in their families to attend college will receive a generous financial boost from The Coca-Cola Foundation. The Coca-Cola First-Generation Last Mile Scholarship will provide 10 first-generation students at Central Washington University with significant financial support—$5,000 per year for two years—during their junior and senior years.</p><p>“We estimate that more than 15 to 20 percent of our first-year and transfer students are the first in their families to attend college,” said Scott Wade, vice president of CWU University Advancement and executive director of the CWU Foundation. “The Coca-Cola Company has an outstanding reputation for supporting educational opportunities for first-generation students in the United States.”</p><p>By providing more than half of average tuition and fees for the year, the Last Mile scholarships will allow students to focus on their studies instead of spending excessive time at a job to pay for their education. The purpose is for students to graduate on time with the academic standing necessary to successfully compete in graduate programs or pursue a career.</p><p>To apply for the scholarship, students need to contact the CWU Scholarship Office at www.cwu.edu/scholarships/Coca-ColaFirstGen. The deadline to apply for the 2015-2016 school year is October 15, 2015.</p><p>Qualified applicants are:<br>• First-generation students (students who are the first in their immediate families to attend college)<br>• Students who are either returning or transferring to CWU as juniors in fall quarter 2015<br>• Full-time students with a GPA of 3.0 or greater<br>• Students with demonstrated financial need</p><p>Students enrolled in Ellensburg or any of the seven CWU university centers are eligible to apply for the scholarship.</p><p>Students will receive $5,000 for the first year. If they maintain a 3.0 grade point average and make satisfactory progress towards their degree, they’ll receive the second $5,000 for their senior year.</p><p>The overall purpose of the scholarships is to increase the retention and graduation rates of the scholarship recipients. It is expected that the retention rate for scholarship holders will be 90 to 100 percent from junior to senior year and that at least 80 percent of the 2015 scholarship recipients will graduate in 2017.</p><p>“We’re excited that one of the most recognized companies in the world is partnering with us to help our students,” enthused Wade. “We hope we will be working with them for many years.”</p><p><br>Since 1993, The Coca-Cola First Generation Scholarship (CCFG) program has supported students who are the first in their immediate family to attend college or university.&nbsp; Since its inception, over $39 million in scholarships has been awarded to over 3,200 students on more than 450 campuses throughout the United States.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br></br></br></br></br></br>Egger named Director of the Office of Undergraduate Researchhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2545Thu, 24 Sep 2015 13:31:15<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/EggerA624.jpg" style="width: 155px; height: 200px; margin-left: 6px; margin-right: 6px; float: left;">Anne Egger, assistant professor in geological sciences and science education, has been named the director of the Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR).</p><p>“CWU really excels in the area of undergraduate research”, said Dominic Klyve, the interim director of the Douglas Honors College, “and I’m very excited about bringing in new leadership as we continue to expand the good work we are doing.”&nbsp;</p><p>Egger brings a long history of involvement with undergraduate research to the position. Prior to arriving at CWU, she served as co-director of the undergraduate research program in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, where she grew the program from five to nearly 50 students over seven years. In addition, she served a three-year term as geoscience councilor in the Council on Undergraduate Research, and has mentored several undergraduates at Stanford as well as at CWU in projects that range from assessing the geoscience literacy of introductory students to mapping fault scarps to determine seismic hazards.</p><p>Undergraduate research and creative expression have grown significantly since the office was first established in 2005, particularly evident in the expansion of SOURCE (Symposium On University Research and Creative Expression) as a venue for student presentations.</p><p>“I look forward to building on that growth and success and working with other programs on campus to establish undergraduate research within the campus culture,” said Egger.</p><p>Formerly housed in Graduate Studies and Research, the OUR moved to the William O. Douglas Honors College in fall 2015. The appointment comes with a reorganization and revitalization of the OUR.</p><p>The OUR is also hiring an assistant director to manage the administration of SOURCE and OUR fellowships, allowing the new director to spend more time on faculty development, training, and university-wide coordination of undergraduate research.</p><p>Klyve, who chaired the search committee for the new director, was pleased and surprised by the interest in the position from the campus community.&nbsp; “Our committee interviewed a number of faculty who are strongly devoted to undergraduate research.&nbsp; I was deeply impressed by the depth and breadth of experience demonstrated by Central’s faculty.”&nbsp; Klyve pointed out that Egger’s experience in reaching outside of her discipline to build undergraduate research connections, together with her administrative experience, made her the perfect person for the job.</p><p>Egger assumes her new responsibilities on September 15.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p>Klyve named interim director of the William O. Douglas Honors Collegehttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2544Fri, 28 Aug 2015 08:54:41<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/D%20Klyve%20portrait-a.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 300px; margin-left: 7px; margin-right: 7px; float: right;">Math professor Dominic Klyve has been named interim director of Central Washington University’s William O. Douglas Honors College (DHC). CWU Provost Marilyn Levine recently appointed the former director, Anne Cubilié, to the position of associate provost.</p><p>“This is an exciting time for the DHC,” said Klyve. “Enrollment in the Honors College has increased 90 percent during last six years. The number of students completing capstone projects has more than doubled, and the DHC has begun expanding programs for students.”</p><p>The DHC offers an interdisciplinary curriculum, and has recently established its four pillars of coordinated intellectual engagement—Critical Thinking, Undergraduate Research, Community-Based Research, and Leadership—which guide course selection and student capstone projects.</p><p>As the DHC’s associate director since 2014, Klyve promotes a broad and interdisciplinary research program and is deeply committed to undergraduate research. He has supervised more than 40 research students, and has published seven peer-reviewed publications with undergraduate students, and he holds several national leadership roles in the field.</p><p>During his time at Central, he has published research in journals in the fields of mathematics, gastroenterology, philosophy, linguistics, pedagogy, Shakespeare studies, and the history of biology. He looks forward to working with students to expand the diversity of their research experiences and their engagement with the broader scholarly community.&nbsp;</p><p>For the past three years, he has served as a councilor to the national Council on Undergraduate Research, and this year was elected chair of their Mathematics and Computer Science Division. He is the founding chair of the Special Interest Group on Undergraduate Research of the Mathematics Association of America, and he regularly travels around the country speaking to groups of students at the middle school, high school, and college levels.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br>