CWUNewsNewshttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/newsen-usStellar CWU Graduate to Pursue Love of Languageshttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2540Wed, 10 Jun 2015 09:11:21<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/OHirschey.jpeg" style="width: 427px; height: 320px;"></p><p>“I’ve always been interested in languages,” says soon-to-be-graduate Olivia Hirschey. “My mother remembers that in preschool, I tried to help a Japanese girl learn English.”</p><p>Hirschey still likes to help people overcome language barriers. A tour guide for Central Washington University, she noticed that students with Spanish-speaking parents weren’t able to follow the English-language, self-guided tour brochure, so she took it upon herself to translate the brochure into Spanish. Later she gave the university’s first face-to-face tour in Spanish.</p><p>“Many of our applicants are first-generation college students, and need support through this new experience,” she commented. “When we [at CWU] engage the family, we can help students in the long run.”</p><p>Hirschey will be graduating this weekend <em>summa cum laude</em> with dual bachelors’ degrees in English and Spanish and a minor in linguistics. The Newcastle, Washington native is also an Arts and Humanities Honors Scholar in the Douglas Honors College. Her DHC senior thesis, “Language and Legislation: Bilingual Education in the United States, 18th&nbsp;Century-Present,” is a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between politics and bilingual education legislation in the US school system. In 2013, she was initiated into Phi Kappa Phi, the nation's oldest and most selective collegiate honor society, and she was recently awarded the society’s annual fellowship to support her first year of graduate study.</p><p>Her parents encouraged her love of language from the beginning. They enrolled her in a dual-language elementary school, and for six years she was immersed in Spanish language and culture.</p><p>Last summer she was finally able to study abroad at the Universidad de Salamanca in Spain—“I’ve always wanted to go, but between two jobs and two majors, it was difficult fitting it in.” After an “amazing” month of intensive language study, Hirschey did a whirlwind tour of Europe—“I saw 17 cities in six countries!”</p><p>This fall, she will enter the University of Colorado-Boulder to pursue a doctoral degree in linguistics, focusing on language acquisition and sociolinguistics.</p><p>Foreshadowing her career as an academic, Hirschey has pursued several research avenues. As lead writing tutor in the Learning Commons, she noticed students adjusting to the new format of question-based collaborative learning adopted by the faculty and staff. She conducted a research project, “Assessing the Expectations for Learning Commons Tutoring,” which she presented to students and faculty at the 2014 Symposium on Undergraduate Research and Creative Expression (SOURCE), where it won the Brooks Library Best Presentation Award. Hirschey later presented her research at the 2015 National Conference on Undergraduate Research.</p><p>Her research acumen and interest in linguistics caught the attention of mathematics professor Dominic Klyve, who had a languishing research project involving the linguistic research of 18th-century mathematician Leonhard Euler. Working with Klyve, Hirschey analyzed the previously unpublished documents—“I had to teach myself articulatory phonetics of the 18th century”— and wrote “The Missing <em>Meditatio</em>: Leonhard Euler’s (1707–1783) Contribution to Articulatory Phonetics,” which was published in <em>Historiographia Linguistica</em> 42/1 (2015). Hirschey was first author on the paper, a singular achievement for an undergraduate.</p><p>“The work wouldn’t have been done if not for Olivia,” noted Klyve, who has nothing but praise for his motivated co-author.</p><p>“Truly, I could not have asked for a better undergraduate experience,” said Hirschey, a Newport High School graduate (’11) who came to CWU because she had heard that it had a great community and really cared about its students—“which I have experienced since the first day I got here. I have received so much support and motivation from staff and faculty. They have all encouraged me to pursue projects and set high goals.<br><br>“I want to come back as an alumna and say ‘I was part of that.’ I’m proud to be part of the Wildcat family.”</p><p>Photo credit: Mphotography</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p></br></br></br>Krista Zimmerman published in Scribendi 2015http://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2537Tue, 19 May 2015 10:55:30<h4>May 19, 2015&nbsp;</h4><p>DHC junior, Krista Zimmerman has her work featured twice in the annual Scribendi publication of the Western Regional Honors Council (WRHC). Scribendi is an academic journal of creative works by honors students in the liberal arts, representing over 200 universities within the WRHC.</p><h3>Three Ravens</h3><p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/Three%20Ravens.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 183px;"></p><p>Copic marker on paper, 30” x 11”</p><p>Winner of the visual art staff choice award.</p><p>“I have always had a fascination with birds, and when I saw pictures of white ravens for the first time, I was inspired to study them and create a piece fascinating their mystique.”</p><p>&nbsp;</p><h3>Watching Wolf</h3><p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/Watching_Wolf.jpg" style="width: 438px; height: 600px;"></p><p>Pen on paper, 11” by 14”</p><p>“This serves to symbolize the vast number of elements that make up, and are therefore necessary to the survival of, the natural world. If these factors, such as the many small aspects that make up a habitat for a species, are removed, that species’ survival is in danger. These [type of] works attempt to convey some of the wonder of nature to those who might not have had the chance to experience it or who have forgotten in the bustle of everyday life. I hope to make at least a tiny impact in making people see that the natural world is worth protecting.”</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Ms. Zimmerman is currently working on her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art here at Central Washington University and is very involved with the William O. Douglas Honors College as a student and a peer mentor within the DHC Living Learning Community.</p><p>“This experience speaks strongly to my belief that an artist, or a member of any field really, can always be improved by being open to knowledge from all subjects, fields, and ways of thought.”</p>CWU's Observer showcases SOURCEhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2536Thu, 14 May 2015 10:02:42<p><em><strong>Victoria Shamrell, Staff Reporter (Observer)</strong></em></p><p><em><strong>May 13, 2015</strong></em></p><p>The Symposium Of University Research and Creative Expression (SOURCE)—a university-wide forum that showcases the research and work of students and faculty from various departments across Central—is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.</p><p>On May 21, 34 different departments are participating in over 350 presentations at SOURCE. In addition, SURC 137A will be live streamed online to allow people from around the state to see what’s going on.</p><p>A key experience of students presenting at SOURCE is the chance to work and grow under a mentor.</p><h3>Finding a mentor</h3><p>Meghan Gilbert, junior psychology major, is a student presenter who is working under a mentor for her SOURCE presentation. According to Gilbert, to find a mentor for SOURCE a student usually has to take the initiative and actively seek one out.</p><p>“It’s more of a student seeking out opportunities in their departments. You have to seek that out yourself; it’s not given or provided for you,” Gilbert said.</p><p>Dr. Jesse James is a lecturer in the psychology department and Gilbert’s mentor. James said that he always encourages students in his research methods class to join a professor’s lab and participate in research.</p><p>“I strongly recommend you be proactive and go approach someone that is researching in an area that is similar to your own interests, but I rarely have students take the initiative from that invitation to actually go and approach another professor,” James said. “We can just keep encouraging and keep hoping that students will take advantage of that opportunity.”</p><h3>An amazing opportunity</h3><p>Jamie Gilbert is the SOURCE coordinator this year. The one-on-one time students can spend with their mentor is priceless, Jamie Gilbert said. Though mentors are there to help students, they wait for students to ask for their help before they give it.</p><p>“One of the best things about Central is our smaller classrooms and being able to get know your professors more and learn from them,” Gilbert said. “I believe Central is all about mentorship.”</p><p>Meghan Gilbert said that having a mentor has allowed her to be a part of the whole process of putting together an individual project for SOURCE and expanded her knowledge.</p><p>“I’ve also had like different relationships; when it’s been more like I’ve had mentors who will sit there and talk at me and ask me to do really small things, but I don’t feel like I learned anything from the process,” Meghan Gilbert said. “Dr. James has allowed me to be very hands-on with it, and he’s there if I have questions or if I need to learn more. But he’s really allowed me to put together the project as a whole, and I’ve really enjoyed that, and I felt like it’s really helped me grow as a student.”</p><h3>Mentoring Students</h3><p>According to James, it is a wonderful process, and he loves mentoring students. There are dull and exciting moments just like everything else; when moments are really mundane, all they can do is just trudge through because the end result is coming and that’s what makes it all worth it.</p><p>“My favorite part of mentoring students is knowing that my students are gaining new knowledge and skills that they learned in abstract ways in the classroom that they are using for the first time in a real applied kind of way,” James said. “When they start to produce something, some project, some end product, a poster, research project or new knowledge that has never been found in the history of the world, I think that’s really exciting.”</p><p>Jamie Gilbert said that all students who present at SOURCE have the opportunity to work one-on-one with their mentors.</p><p>“A lot of universities are so large that students don’t have the opportunity to work one-on-one with their professors, SOURCE and Central gives students that opportunity,” Jamie Gilbert said. ”It’s great for the professors too, because they get the chance to showcase the help on their research but to also be able help in that growth in their students.”</p><p><a href="http://cwuobserver.com/5599/scene/source-celebrates-20th-anniversary-at-central/" target="_blank">http://cwuobserver.com/5599/scene/source-celebrates-20th-anniversary-at-central/</a></p>DHC Sponsors Movie Magic and Math at CWU Fridayhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2531Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:54:11<p>What is the secret ingredient in that makes animated Disney and Pixar movies come alive? Mathematics!</p><p>Join renowned mathematics professor Michael Dorff for his presentation, “Movies and Math—the Past, Present, and the Future.” Using examples from the animated films <em>Frozen</em> and <em>The Incredibles</em>, Dorff will demonstrate how the films’ artists used math to achieve effects like realistic snow and quick-moving characters.</p><p>Dorff’s presentation will also convey the important role math has in creating Hollywood blockbusters, and how mathematics will shape the future of the film industry. The presentation takes place on at 4:00 p.m. Friday, February 27 in the CWU Science Building, Room 147, and is free and open to the public.</p><p>Dorff is an acclaimed mathematics lecturer from Brigham Young University. His presentation is sponsored by Douglas Honors College.</p><p><br>For more information, contact Madelyne Weber, 509-963-1900, or dhc@cwu.edu.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p></br></br></br>November Is the Month of Givinghttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2527Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:19:47<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/CFD%2030th%20Logo-V1-1.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;">Dear Campus Community,</p><p>November is the month of giving.</p><p>I hope you will join me in celebrating and participating in the Washington State Combined Fund Drive (CFD). This statewide project leverages millions for local communities. Our contributions to CFD can support the work we hold most important anywhere in the state.</p><p>Both active and retired Washington State public employees may participate in this program, the fourth largest public employee giving program in the nation. About 5,000 individuals pledge more than $5 million each year, benefitting more than 3,800 local, national and global charities. Those are big numbers and CWU's participation can make them even bigger.</p><p>Making a donation is easy. Simply follow this link www.cwu.edu/cfd.&nbsp; Just choose from the list of participating organizations and pledge your 2014 CFD contribution. If you prefer, fill out a contribution form and take it to the CWU Department of Human Resources in Bouillon Hall. CFD makes giving easy by allowing monthly, recurring and limited-time contributions. You can even write a personal check or authorize payroll deductions through the CWU payroll system. You decide what works best for you.</p><p>Some CWU employees are already giving their time to this effort. Special thanks go to the CWU Giving Committee:</p><p>Michelle Adams &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Stephanie Harris&nbsp;&nbsp; Leona Lindvig<br>Joseph Bryant &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Linda Huber &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Melody Madlem<br>Edna Comedy (Chairperson) &nbsp; &nbsp; Drue Larson &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Charity McCright<br>Sarah Feeney&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Claire Layman &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Tracy Plouse<br>Lindsey Ulrich</p><p>Remember:&nbsp; The amount you give isn’t what’s important. Every dollar helps support important community services. Help CWU reach 100-percent participation in CFD this year. With your help, we can do it!</p><p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/gaudino%20sig.jpg" style="width: 138px; height: 61px;"><br>James L. Gaudino<br>President</p><p>&nbsp;</p></br></br></br></br></br></br>Two DHC Instructors Honored as 2014 Distinguished Professorshttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2517Wed, 21 May 2014 11:28:47<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/Distinguished%20profs%20composite_0.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 291px;"></p><p>The designation of Distinguished Professor is the highest award attainable at CWU and represents the highest level of performance. Each year, nominations are sought in four categories--teaching, service, and research/creative expression for tenured professors, and a non-tenure track distinguished faculty award for teaching.</p><p>This year's honors go to Matthew Altman, philosophy and religious studies, for research; Lila Harper, English, for non-tenure-track teaching; and Shari Stoddard, art, teaching. The award for service was not granted this year.</p><p>Altman has a passionate commitment to both teaching and research. Of the relation between the two, he says, “I entered this profession because I wanted to teach philosophy, so my research is never divorced from the work I am doing with students both in and out of the classroom.” He works primarily in applied ethics, Kant and nineteenth-century philosophy, and normative ethics, but he also teaches and publishes on social and political philosophy, the philosophy of law, and the philosophy of art. Despite his many duties as department chair (and recently as director of the Douglas Honors College), Altman is a prolific writer, and has published four books in the past six years, in addition to numerous articles, book chapters, reviews, and encyclopedia entries.</p><p>An expert in 19th-century British literature, Harper has broad interests within the field, contributing nine articles and book chapters on the relationships between&nbsp; natural history, mathematics, and science fiction, and publishing two books. As a teacher of writing, she has written instructional manuals for Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum. She not only teaches first-year composition and Introduction to Literature, she also has taught classes on writing in the computer sciences for the Department of Computer Science. In addition, she taught classes for the Douglas Honors Colleges, from Ecological Imperialism and Women’s Travel Writing to Senior Thesis. Described as “exceptional” by students, Harper has been at CWU since 1989. In addition to being the graduate school’s thesis editor since 2002, she is also a past faculty advisor for the University Writing Center.</p><p>Stoddard, who joined the CWU art faculty in 2002, has taught art education at Indiana University, the University of South Carolina, and Ball State University. Stoddard's resume contains an extensive list of papers presented at international, national, regional, and local conferences on topics such as including aesthetics and art criticism in elementary school curricula, cooperative learning strategies, and reflective thinking. She is recognized as both an educator and as an artist. After 14 years as Director of the Visual Art Teaching Program, Stoddard will retire at the end of this academic year.</p><p>There will be a recognition ceremony and reception to honor these and outstanding members of the CWU academic community at 5:00 p.m. on May 19 in the SURC Ballroom. Distinguished professors will also be recognized at the Honors Convocation on June 13.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p><strong>Article Source: <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/altman-harper-stoddard-honored-2014-distinguished-professors">cwu news</a></strong></p>SOURCE Showcases CWU Scholarship and Creative Expressionhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2516Wed, 14 May 2014 07:52:50<p><img alt="" src="/douglas-honors/sites/cts.cwu.edu.douglas-honors/files/images/SOURCE.jpg" style="width: 251px; height: 320px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;"></p><p>The Symposium On University Research and Creative Expression (SOURCE) celebrates its 19th year dedicated to student scholarship at Central Washington University. On the Ellensburg campus, SOURCE will be held from 8:10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on May 15 in the Student Union Recreation Center. The event is free and open to the public.</p><p>The symposium provides students, faculty and staff from all departments and units with a platform to present their individual or collaborative scholarly work, while providing a forum for sharing and celebrating that scholarship with the university and broader community.</p><p>“SOURCE just gets better every year,” said organizer Kara Gabriel, CWU professor, psychology. “The students keep raising the bar on the quality of their presentations.”</p><p>SOURCE 2014 celebrates 361 presentations with 604 listed authors and co-authors. All presentations are mentored by faculty or staff at CWU. This year, mentors are also from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Yakima Valley Community College, and Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences as well as Ellensburg High School, Selah Junior High School, Walter Strom Middle School, Chief Joseph Middle School in Richland, and Chief Kanim Middle School in Fall City."</p><p>This year’s symposium features many distinct types of presentations, including 138 oral presentations, 3 panel presentations, 22 creative expression performances or presentations, 143 poster presentations with 9 more at satellite campuses, 27 constructed objects, and 13 creative works, including a fashion show with eight designs. Information about the presentations may be found in the SOURCE handbook, online at https://www.cwu.edu/source/sites/cts.cwu.edu.source/files/documents/2014_SOURCE_Program-Web.pdf</p><p>Students from CWU’s Puget Sound area centers are also participating. SOURCE-Des Moines will be held on Tuesday, May 13, from 2:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Higher Education Center, Bldg 29. SOURCE-Lynnwood will be held on Wednesday, May 14, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. in Snoqualmie Hall.</p><p>For more information about SOURCE, go to http://www.cwu.edu/source/</p><p>Student Travis Rossignol designed the cover art for SOURCE 2014.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p>“What is Happiness” course inspires students http://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2513Mon, 05 May 2014 12:08:42<p>A group of students in the DHC course titled “What is Happiness” decided to spread what they had learned by starting “Happy Day” at CWU.</p><p>The event took place in the SURC yesterday morning and afternoon, ending just before Student Appreciation Day Activities kicked off.</p><p>“What is Happiness” is a course taught by Natalie Lupton made up of about 12 students. The class involved a class project that the students were allowed to come up with themselves. The class chose to put on an event promoting happiness called “Happy day.”</p><p>Sophomore students BriAnne Pauley and Danielle Brandli were the coordinators for the event which included free prizes, henna tattoos and outdoor activities such as bocce ball.</p><p>The event doesn’t correlate with any national holidays but was strategically placed at the end of the quarter when students are stressed out with projects and finals.</p><p>Local businesses such as Dominos, Pitta Pit and Royal Sports contributed gift cards which were raffled off for free. A steady stream of students participated in tie-dying, bracelet making, slack lining and henna.</p><p>Yessica Martin participated in Happy day and was particularly excited about the henna tattoos.</p><p>“I think it’s very fun and it definitely ties us together as a school,” said Marquez.</p><p>Tyler Alling, a sophomore molecular biology and ecology major is part of the Douglass Honors College and helped hand out flowers to passersby.</p><p>“I think that what this club is doing is great,” Alling said.</p><p>Alling plans to join the new happiness club, which will officially start next Fall.</p><p>Brandli and Pauley will be in charge of the happiness club, to be titled “students in pursuit of happiness” club. Brandli will serve as president while Pauley will be vice president.</p><p>The club hopes to put on events similar to Happy Day at least twice next year. The club will also do activities such as handing out flowers and holding forums on happiness.</p><p>This year’s happy day included speech by Dr. Ken Briggs speech on the correlation between positive behavior and happiness at noon, a performance from Jazz Band III, piano performing and a free showing of Patch Adams put on by the Neuroscience club. The Central Washington Artists United club provided art for students.</p><p>The goal of the event was to keep everything free. For coordinator Pauley, that was the best part.</p><p>“I think it’s just seeing people’s faces when we tell them this is for free,” Pauley said in response to being asked what part of the process made her the most happy.</p><p>“All of the planning and putting it together was really hard but it was really fun,” Brandli said.</p><p>Those interested in the Students in the Pursuit of Happiness cub should email Danielle Brandli at brandli.d@gmail.com</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Written by CONNIE MORGAN, staff reporter of the <a href="http://cwuobserver.com/happy-day/">CWU Observer student newspaper</a></p>CWU’s Douglas Honors College Continues Record Growthhttp://www.cwu.edu/douglas-honors/node/2479Mon, 01 Oct 2012 11:18:31<p>ELLENSBURG, Wash. (October 1, 2012) -- The William O. Douglas Honors College (DHC) at Central Washington University has enrolled a total of 183 students for the 2012-2013 academic year, including 48 first-year students, more than at any point in its more than 35-year history.</p><p>“Because of its support for the Douglas Honors College, Central is attracting some of the best and brightest students from throughout the Northwest,” said Matthew Altman, director of program. “Average high school GPAs and standardized test scores for entering DHC students have increased in recent years, and this year is no exception. We’re bringing more high-performing students to Central.”</p><p>The DHC is also known for its guest speakers, its frequent cultural field trips, and the students it sends annually to present their work at the Western Regional Honors Council Conference. From 2008 to 2012, 53 DHC students attended the conference, and each year the college sends the largest student delegation.</p><p>Altman said that the DHC is also making a greater effort to recruit local high school graduates into the program.</p><p>To boost enrollment, the university worked to overhaul its honors curriculum, changing from a Great Books program to a thematically based series of courses in the humanities, arts, and social and physical sciences. The new program was unveiled in fall 2009, and it is open to both recent high school graduates and transfer students. One incentive is the partial tuition waiver that each honors student receives.</p><p>The new DHC curriculum is composed of two parts. The core curriculum is distinctive among programs in the Northwest for its interdisciplinary coursework, small class sizes, and the participation of faculty from throughout the university. In the upper-division courses, students perform research with faculty mentors and write theses of publishable quality, an experience that prepares them well for either graduate school or the job market.</p><p><br>Media contact: Matthew Altman, director, Douglas Honors College, 509-963-1440, altmanm@cwu.edu<br>Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p></br></br>