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Food Science and Nutrition Alumni

Z-trim is an Acceptable Fat Substitute at 25% in Oatmeal Cookies

by Angie Bellevue, Amber Hall, & Jaclyn Slonaker

Angie Bellevue, Amber Hall, & Jaclyn Slonaker

High fat diets contribute to heart disease, obesity, and a majority of other chronic diseases. In our research we hoped to produce a suitable oatmeal cookie with less fat, using a carbohydrate corn derived starch fat replacement product, z-trim. This study was a blind, randomized, controlled study. A pre-packaged cookie mix was used according to the package instructions for the control and 25% of the fat was replaced for one variable (reduced fat), and 75% of the fat was replaced for the second variable (low fat), controlling all other variables. We attended lower level nutrition classes at Central Washington University and recruited approximately 60 college aged judges, both male and female.  Participants each completed three of the following five sensory tests including difference, moistness, preference, saltiness, and sweetness.

The data that was obtained was subjective data based on their perceptions of our product and the questions we asked. Two objective tests were performed using a TA.XT2 texture analyzer to measure penetration and shear force. The data was analyzed using analysis of variance. The reduced fat cookie was found to be an acceptable product, while the low fat cookie was significantly different from the control and had the lowest mean preference score. Because the reduced fat cookie was an acceptable product, Z-trim could be used in small percentages to replace fat in baked goods or other items. Since Z-trim is so versatile, any person could use Z-trim in their daily diet to reduce fat and calories, reducing the risk of chronic disease.

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