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Food Science and Nutrition Alumni

Gluten Free Flours Produce a Different Yet Acceptable Cornbread

by Tyler Engstrom, Lindsey Woodkey, Matt Thornton, Ivan Ivanov

Tyler Engstrom, Lindsey Woodkey, Matt Thornton, Ivan Ivanov

With the increasing incidence of Celiac Disease more companies are beginning to develop gluten free products, replacing ingredients containing gluten proteins with acceptable replacements. This study examined the use of gluten free flours including a gluten free flour blend and 100 % quinoa flour in place of all purpose refined wheat flour in cornbread.

The acceptability of these cornbread variations was evaluated by 30 untrained sensory judges, and included tests for moistness, bitterness, and overall preference as well as duo-trio tests to determine if subjects could distinguish between gluten free and non gluten free varieties. Objective tests for compressibility, shear force, withdrawal force, and volume were also conducted. Sensory tests revealed that while judges could distinguish between the cornbreads at a statistically significant level (p≤.05), no significant difference in preference existed. The regular, all purpose flour cornbread was significantly more moist and less bitter than the gluten free versions, but according to overall preference; subjects did not rate it significantly higher than the others.

Objective testing revealed statistically significant differences between the cornbreads produced with quinoa or gluten free flour and that made with all purpose flour in each of the areas tested. These findings illustrate that although significant difference exist both in sensory and objective tests, individual taste preferences vary and that one single version of cornbread will not appeal to all consumers.

The conclusion is that gluten free flour blends and quinoa flour are acceptable replacements for all purpose refined wheat flour in cornbread.

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