CWUComputer Science NewsComputer Science Newshttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/newsen-usFall 2014 Newsletter http://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1578Thu, 11 Dec 2014 08:31:08<p>Computer Science <a href="/computer-science/sites/cts.cwu.edu.computer-science/files/documents/cwu_cs_fall2014.pdf" target="_blank">Fall 2014 Newsletter</a> is now available.&nbsp;</p>November 2014 code challenge is now availablehttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1577Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:24:26<p>The CS coding challenge for November 2014 is now available. As it is the first coding challenge of the year, it is ³easy enough² for beginning students (CS110) to understand but should be challenging enough to require sr. or grad students to have to think a bit to get the solution.</p><p>The Task: You are a programmer for a cybersecurity company, and you are part of a project team in need of prime numbers. Such numbers are often-used ingredients for encrypting data (want to know more, take the CS450 course offered in the fall). Your boss is a bit eccentric, and he's in need of not "just" prime numbers, but what he calls "super primes." They are numbers which are prime, and whose digits sum to a prime number, too.</p><p>For example, the number 61 is a super prime, because 61 is prime and 6+1=7 is prime, too. However the number 59 is not super prime, because although<br>59 is prime, 5+9=14 is not.</p><p><br>More information and instructions on how to submit are at the following<br>URL:<a href="http://Subject: November 2014 code challenge is now available Dear students and faculty, The CS coding challenge for November 2014 is now available. As it is the first coding challenge of the year, it is ³easy enough² for beginning students (CS110) to understand but should be challenging enough to require sr. or grad students to have to think a bit to get the solution. The Task: You are a programmer for a cybersecurity company, and you are part of a project team in need of prime numbers. Such numbers are often-used ingredients for encrypting data (want to know more, take the CS450 course offered in the fall). Your boss is a bit eccentric, and he's in need of not &quot;just&quot; prime numbers, but what he calls &quot;super primes.&quot; They are numbers which are prime, and whose digits sum to a prime number, too. For example, the number 61 is a super prime, because 61 is prime and 6+1=7 is prime, too. However the number 59 is not super prime, because although 59 is prime, 5+9=14 is not. More information and instructions on how to submit are at the following URL: http://www.cwu.edu/~jagodzinski/codeChallenge.html Thanks, Filip Filip Jagodzinski Assistant Professor Interim Director, Computational Science Masters Program Department of Computer Science Central Washington University Tel : 509.963.1435 Email : jagodzinski@cwu.edu Web : cwu.edu/~jagodzinski"> http://www.cwu.edu/~jagodzinski/codeChallenge.html</a></p><p><br>Thanks,</p><p>Filip Jagodzinski<br>Assistant Professor<br>Interim Director, Computational Science Masters Program Department of Computer Science Central Washington University Tel : 509.963.1435 Email : jagodzinski@cwu.edu Web : <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/~jagodzinski">cwu.edu/~jagodzinski</a></p></br></br></br></br></br></br>Seattle Industry Security Experts Presentationhttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1576Mon, 17 Nov 2014 08:36:12<p>Ada Lovelace Club and JD Brennan, Principal Software Engineer of DocuSign,<br>present:</p><p>Title: Be More Hirable with Knowledge of Security and Build Systems</p><p>Synopsis: Security Researcher John Heasman and CWU alumni Kurt Boberg share ideas on how you can stand-out from the crowd by gaining practical knowledge of security issues and build systems, two in demand areas for employers. John Heasman has lots of good stories from many years in the Info Sec world and he's spoken at Black Hat and DefCon.</p><p><br>When: November 17, 2014<br>Time: 4:00 PM<br>Location: Hebeler 121</p></br></br></br></br>March 2014 Code Challengehttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1575Thu, 06 Mar 2014 09:24:23<p>The CS code challenge for March 2014 has been posted to the following URL:<br><a href="http://www.cwu.edu/~jagodzinski/codeChallenge.html" target="_blank">http://www.cwu.edu/~jagodzinski/codeChallenge.html</a></p><p>The first person to submit a correct program will receive a $20 gift certificate to the CWU bookstore, and will have his or her name displayed on the new department monitor now up in the hallway on the second floor of Hebeler.</p><p>Please contact Filip Jagodzinski at <a href="mailto:jagodzinski@cwu.edu">jagodzinski@cwu.edu</a> / (509)963-1435 / Office: Hebeler 214E.</p><p>GOOD LUCK!</p></br></a href="mailto:jagodzinski@cwu.edu">CWU Student Creates Revolutionary Text-to-Speech Readerhttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1574Wed, 11 Dec 2013 11:49:35<p><img alt="" src="/computer-science/sites/cts.cwu.edu.computer-science/files/images/CAR_Logo_128.png" style="width: 128px; height: 128px;"></p><p>Spencer Graffe, a senior in Central Washington University’s Computer Science Program, has helped develop Central Access Reader (CAR), a free computerized text-to-speech reader program that has attracted attention of institutions across the nation.</p><br><p><span style="line-height: 1.4;">Marshall Sunnes, Central Access program coordinator and Wendy Holden, Disability and Accessibility Consultant, collaborated to determine what the program should be, how it should look, and what features were most important to include. Graffe had the skills to make it happen.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.4;">The program, developed as a tool to assist students with print-related disabilities—those with visual impairments, dyslexia, attention-deficit disorder, or other conditions—reads documents that other text-readers can’t handle, especially those with equations or symbols.</span></p><p>The program started as a computer science class capstone project. Central Access, CWU’s department that makes educational materials accessible to people with disabilities, hired Graffe to continue to work on the program after the project ended. The Central Access Reader has attracted the attention of schools across the country. In recent weeks, Sunnes&nbsp;has received inquiries about the program from numerous institutions, including MIT and Harvard.&nbsp;<br><br>In addition to an intuitive user interface and simple customizations, the program is able to read documents that contain symbols from geometry and trigonometry, linear algebra, calculus, math, logic, or statistics. Sophomore Justin Wilson, another computer science major, refined its math-reading abilities. The powerful, yet simple, interface allows the user to customize how the text looks and sounds.<br><br>The program is being installed on both Macs and PCs at CWU and is currently being used by both students and faculty. The program can be downloaded free at http://www.cwu.edu/central-access/reader.</p><p>Central Access serves not only the university community, but also provides materials to institutions and schools across the country. Central Access leads the industry in offering accessible products, including electronic text, Braille, and tactile graphics.</p><p><br>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p></br></span style="line-height: 1.4;"></span style="line-height: 1.4;"></br></br></br></br></br>Holiday Celebrationhttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1573Mon, 02 Dec 2013 15:22:16<p>Thursday, December 5, 11:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. / Hebeler Hall, Room 218</p>Department Newsletters http://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1571Mon, 02 Dec 2013 15:13:48<p><a href="/computer-science/sites/cts.cwu.edu.computer-science/files/documents/cwu_cs_fall2013.pdf" target="_blank">Fall 2013 - Newsletter </a></p><p><a href="/computer-science/sites/cts.cwu.edu.computer-science/files/documents/cwu_cs_winter2014.pdf" id="CS Winter 2014 Newsletter" target="_blank">Winter 2014 - Newsletter&nbsp;</a></p><p><a href="/computer-science/sites/cts.cwu.edu.computer-science/files/documents/cwu_cs_spring2014.pdf" id="CS Spring 2014 Newsletter" target="_blank">Spring 2014 - Newsletter</a></p><p><a href="/computer-science/sites/cts.cwu.edu.computer-science/files/documents/cwu_cs_fall2014.pdf" target="_blank">Fall 2014 - Newsletter</a></p>Garret Bolton's Thesis Proposalhttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1569Fri, 11 Oct 2013 14:20:21<p>Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 4:00 pm in Hebeler 106. The proposed area of research is Mountain Pass Finder Algorithm.</p>Brian Orndorff and Professor Filip Jagodzinski attended the ACM-BCB conference in Washington D.C.http://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1568Fri, 11 Oct 2013 13:43:32<p>Computer Science undergraduate student Brian Orndorff and Professor Filip Jagodzinski attended the ACM-BCB conference in Washington D.C. in September. Brian presented the accepted paper, "A Combined Molecular Dynamics, Rigidity Analysis Approach for Studying Protein Complexes." Filip and Brian are conducting interdisciplinary research that relies on using mathematical and computer science tools to understand important structural properties of biomolecules.</p>CS Students Win SOURCE Awardshttp://www.cwu.edu/computer-science/node/1565Tue, 21 May 2013 13:52:25<p>You are welcome to join us in supporting our CS presenters at the on-campus award ceremony this Wednesday at noon in the pit in the SURC. Also, Dr. Jagodzinski is nominated as SOURCE 2013 mentor of the year!</p><p>And the winners in CS are......</p><p>BEST ORAL PRESENTATION AWARDS</p><p>Creation Assistant for Easy Assignment<br>Burton, Hank; Brooks, Marshall; Canada, Justin<br>Faculty Mentor: John Anvik, Computer Science</p><p>BEST POSTER PRESENTATION AWARDS</p><p>Rigidity Analysis of Protein-­‐Ligand Conformations Generated by Molecular Dynamics<br>Orndorff, Brian<br>Faculty Mentor: Filip Jagodzinski, Computer Science</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></br></br></br></br>