CWUNewsNewshttp://www.cwu.edu/camp/newsen-usCWU Preparation, Federal Plan Reduce Government Shutdown Effects on Studentshttp://www.cwu.edu/camp/node/2502Tue, 01 Oct 2013 11:49:52<p>October 1, 2013</p><p>ELLENSBURG, Wash. — Rapid processing of federal financial aid and federal contingency plans will protect students at Central Washington University from the most extreme effects of the shutdown of the federal government. The failure of Congress to approve a continuing budget resolution by midnight last night will disrupt the operation of federal programs, including agencies and programs that fund higher education research and many student assistance programs.</p><p>"In preparation for the imminent shutdown, CWU requested reimbursement for all federal awards that had incurred costs. However, we can only be reimbursed for funds we've spent," explained Connie Williams, associate vice president for Business and Financial Affairs. "We've received payment for about 83 percent of what has and will be spent in the next few weeks. We'll cover the remaining 17 percent until Congress agrees on a budget."</p><p>Last week CWU received a memo from US Office of Management and Budget (OMB) outlining the contingency plan for the US Department of Education (DOE) in the event of a government shutdown. The memo said work required to process Pell Grants and subsidized and unsubsidized student loans will continue as normal. Federal employees necessary to support those functions are among the agency's top priorities.</p><p>Federal reimbursements to CWU received so far total about $13.7 million in federal loans and $70,000 for the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), a federal assistance grant reserved for college students with the greatest financial need. As of close of business yesterday, the last day of the federal fiscal year, Williams said about $5 million in loan packages had been offered to, but not officially accepted by, students. If the aid is accepted within the next week, CWU may have to cover those payments until Congress approves a budget.</p><p>Of the total Pell grant funding of $5.5 million, CWU has allocated and received federal payment for about $4 million. Williams said CWU also will hold Pell recipients harmless from the effects of the government shutdown.</p><p>"The bottom line is that students, who were awarded and have accepted federal financial grants and loans by September 30, should not be affected by the federal government shut down," said Williams.&nbsp;</p><p>CWU federal research and non-research funding also may be affected, because reimbursement requests for other grants and contracts are typically processed after September 30, the last day of the federal fiscal year. Funding processing may be suspended until a continuing resolution is approved. The university will be able to submit requests for new awards, but they will not be processed until a new continuing resolution is adopted.</p><p>CWU already has received federal funding for the 2013-2014 school year for the McNair Scholars program, the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP), Higher Education Program (HEP), Student Support Services (SSS), and for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant, which prepares more than 2,000 middle school students in central Washington for success in college.</p><p>However, CWU’s Army ROTC program received a direct hit. Government Services employees had to be furloughed, which will delay books, tuition, room and board and monthly stipends for cadets, since appropriate paperwork cannot be processed. The program is working with the university to avoid any adverse affects on students.</p><p>At this time there is no information on any impact to veteran’s programs through CWU’s Veterans Center.</p><p>Under the contingency plan of the DOE, 90 percent of employees would be immediately furloughed. During the first week of a shutdown the agency would maintain only functions related to the discharge of the duties of presidentially-appointed, senate-confirmed individuals; the protection of life and property; and, as appropriate, the obligation, payment, and support of student financial aid as well as other pre-authorized payments and obligations.</p><p>A shutdown lasting longer than a week, could affect the processing of student loans/grants and payments. Programs using mandatory or multi-year funding from a prior year would continue to operate through a government shutdown, though likely at a slower rate with far fewer employees. The text of the full OMB Contingency Plan may be accessed at: <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/contingency-plans.">www.whitehouse.gov/omb/contingency-plans.</a></p><p><br>Media Contact: Linda Schactler, Executive Director of Public Affairs, 509-963-1384</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, <a href="mailto:valeriec@cwu.edu">valeriec@cwu.edu</a></p>CWU Preparation, Federal Plan Reduce Government Shutdown Effects on Studentshttp://www.cwu.edu/camp/node/2501Tue, 01 Oct 2013 11:47:28<p>Rapid processing of federal financial aid and federal contingency plans will protect students at Central Washington University from the most extreme effects of the shutdown of the federal government. The failure of Congress to approve a continuing budget resolution by midnight last night will disrupt the operation of federal programs, including agencies and programs that fund higher education research and many student assistance programs.</p><p>"In preparation for the imminent shutdown, CWU requested reimbursement for all federal awards that had incurred costs. However, we can only be reimbursed for funds we've spent," explained Connie Williams, associate vice president for Business and Financial Affairs. "We've received payment for about 83 percent of what has and will be spent in the next few weeks. We'll cover the remaining 17 percent until Congress agrees on a budget."</p><p>Last week CWU received a memo from US Office of Management and Budget (OMB) outlining the contingency plan for the US Department of Education (DOE) in the event of a government shutdown. The memo said work required to process Pell Grants and subsidized and unsubsidized student loans will continue as normal. Federal employees necessary to support those functions are among the agency's top priorities.</p><p>Federal reimbursements to CWU received so far total about $13.7 million in federal loans and $70,000 for the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), a federal assistance grant reserved for college students with the greatest financial need. As of close of business yesterday, the last day of the federal fiscal year, Williams said about $5 million in loan packages had been offered to, but not officially accepted by, students. If the aid is accepted within the next week, CWU may have to cover those payments until Congress approves a budget.</p><p>Of the total Pell grant funding of $5.5 million, CWU has allocated and received federal payment for about $4 million. Williams said CWU also will hold Pell recipients harmless from the effects of the government shutdown.</p><p>"The bottom line is that students, who were awarded and have accepted federal financial grants and loans by September 30, should not be affected by the federal government shut down," said Williams.&nbsp;</p><p>CWU federal research and non-research funding also may be affected, because reimbursement requests for other grants and contracts are typically processed after September 30, the last day of the federal fiscal year. Funding processing may be suspended until a continuing resolution is approved. The university will be able to submit requests for new awards, but they will not be processed until a new continuing resolution is adopted.</p><p>CWU already has received federal funding for the 2013-2014 school year for the McNair Scholars program, the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP), Higher Education Program (HEP), Student Support Services (SSS), and for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant, which prepares more than 2,000 middle school students in central Washington for success in college.</p><p>However, CWU’s Army ROTC program received a direct hit. Government Services employees had to be furloughed, which will delay books, tuition, room and board and monthly stipends for cadets, since appropriate paperwork cannot be processed. The program is working with the university to avoid any adverse affects on students.</p><p>At this time there is no information on any impact to veteran’s programs through CWU’s Veterans Center.</p><p>Under the contingency plan of the DOE, 90 percent of employees would be immediately furloughed. During the first week of a shutdown the agency would maintain only functions related to the discharge of the duties of presidentially-appointed, senate-confirmed individuals; the protection of life and property; and, as appropriate, the obligation, payment, and support of student financial aid as well as other pre-authorized payments and obligations.</p><p>A shutdown lasting longer than a week, could affect the processing of student loans/grants and payments. Programs using mandatory or multi-year funding from a prior year would continue to operate through a government shutdown, though likely at a slower rate with far fewer employees. The text of the full OMB Contingency Plan may be accessed at: www.whitehouse.gov/omb/contingency-plans.</p><br><p>Media Contact: Linda Schactler, Executive Director of Public Affairs, 509-963-1384</p><p>October 1, 2013</p>CWU Hispanic Student Enrollment Continues to Climbhttp://www.cwu.edu/camp/node/2500Fri, 31 May 2013 14:57:34<p><img alt="" src="/camp/sites/cts.cwu.edu.camp/files/Gonzalez.jpg" style="width: 466px; height: 228px;"></p><p>Central Washington University has experienced a 169-percent increase in its Hispanic enrollment over the past five years, an upward trend that will continue next year. A number of those students will receive their degrees during the university’s Ellensburg commencement exercises on Saturday, June 8. Pablo Gonzalez, from Zillah, is among them.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.4;">“What attracted me to Central was the great location, beautiful campus, it was close to home, and affordable,” he said. “It was a simple decision.” &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p><p>It’s been a whirlwind four years for Gonzalez who said, about his impending graduation, “This is just the beginning. It feels great to be able to apply what I’ve learned at Central, go forward, become established in my community, and be a contributing member of society.”</p><p>Gonzalez credits the university’s College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) for helping him to get off to a good start in his college studies.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.4;">“CAMP helped me transition from never thinking about going to college to getting into college my first year,” he said. “It was a great resource to ask questions and feel comfortable about being on campus. The staff helped me plan my classes and to graduate on time.”</span></p><p>CAMP predominantly serves freshman students from migrant and seasonal farm working backgrounds. The federally funded program is designed to help students succeed at the outset of their college careers. CAMP students are eligible for a variety of services, such as academic assistance, career planning, cultural enrichment opportunities, financial support, mentoring, and is a connection to additional campus resources.</p><p>Sixty-three students enrolled at CWU last fall with the help of with CAMP. Potentially, even more students could comprise next fall’s class.</p><p>“These [incoming students] are probably the most interested we’ve worked with,” said CAMP Director Miriam Bocchetti. “It’s also the largest number of eligible students to date.”</p><p>Bocchetti added, “While we work primarily with first-year freshman, about 10 percent of our time and effort goes to assist non-first-year students.” That includes some additional academic advising and the annual recognition banquet for graduating seniors.</p><p>Gonzalez is just one of 22 CAMP students that will receive their diplomas next week.</p><p>Admittedly always interested in politics, Gonzalez will graduate with a bachelor of arts in political science, with a minor in communication.&nbsp;</p><p>“I just thought it was the right path,” he said. “I really feel that I can help people learn how the government works and become more knowledgeable.”&nbsp;</p><p>Gonzalez put his studies to use last year, in his bid to become the state representative from the 15th Legislative District. Although unsuccessful, he said it was a fun learning experience.&nbsp; Though it’s not in his near-term plans, Gonzalez is not ruling out another bid for elective office “some day.” In the meantime, he will remain involved in the political process.</p><p>“Since I was one of the first [Latinos] that ran there, I feel I have a responsibility to be a resource for people that do want to [run for office],” he added. &nbsp;</p><p>While at CWU, he also traveled to Central America with the university’s Cross Cultural Leadership Program.</p><p>“We decided to go to El Salvador to deliver stoves to a poverty-stricken community that was suffering breathing problems because they would have to cook inside their houses,” he said. “The stoves reduced emissions and really helped their community.”</p><p>In addition, Gonzalez twice presented his political research, on the North American Free Trade Agreement and on income inequality, at the National Technology and Social Science Conference in Las Vegas.</p><p><strong>Media contact:</strong> Robert Lowery, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-1487, loweryr@cwu.edu</p><p>Photo of Pablo Gonzalez</p><p>Posted May 31, 2013</p>Winter Monthly Seminarhttp://www.cwu.edu/camp/node/2496Mon, 07 Jan 2013 11:51:48<div>Date:<strong>&nbsp;March 7, 2013</strong><br>Time: 4:00-5:00 pm<br>Place: Black 152</div>