CWUBiology NewsBiology Newshttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/newsen-usEburg Soccer Camp July 28-31 Ages 5-14 Also Benefits Cameroonhttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2634Thu, 12 Jun 2014 15:02:30<p>CWU Biology faculty member, Dr. Blaise Dondji, under the Bawa Heath Initiative, will be offering a youth soccer camp this summer to raise funds for a health clinic in Bawa, Cameroon. The clinic will be held July 28-31 at the Ellensburg High School Soccer Fields. Boys and girls from ages 5-8 will attend from 9:00-10:30 and those ages 9-14 will be there from 11:00-1:00pm. There is a $30 minimum donation per child.</p><p>Please contact 509-925-1788 or bawasoccercamp2013@gmail.com to register.</p>Biology graduate has a passion for sharkshttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2633Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:18:22<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Kelsey Martin" src="/biology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.biology/files/McNary_2014_LDL.jpg" style="width: 480px; height: 280px; margin: 5px;"></p><p>Recent Central Washington University graduate Kelsey Martin was destined to be an animal person.</p><p>“When I was a kid my dad would take me fishing,” Martin said. “I loved it. . . . Then one time I walked by and saw Dad kill the fish. That was it.”</p><p>Since then she’s become a vegetarian and isn’t too keen on killing things—even in the name of science—which as a newly minted fisheries biologist, Martin has to do on occasion.</p><p>The 2007 Ellensburg High School graduate always has known she wanted to study biology.</p><p>“I think I was probably 6 or 7 when I decided I wanted to study sharks,” Martin said.</p><p>As a little girl she read books about sharks. Steven Spielberg’s Jaws was her favorite movie.</p><p>“They just had a bad reputation and they needed more people on their side, so I decided I was going to be the one to save them and change people’s minds,” Martin said.</p><p>Yeah, sharks are predators, and they can be dangerous to humans, she admits, but they’re beautiful animals that are mostly just misunderstood. “They’re not out to destroy humanity,” Martin said.</p><p><strong>Walking at commencement</strong></p><p>Martin technically graduated in March, but at commencement on Saturday, she will join the more than 3,100 people in CWU’s Class of 2014 as she accepts her degree in general biology.</p><p>“I like the idea of having a broader base because I do want to study sharks, but more important than anything to me is conservation,” Martin said.</p><p>She already has a job as a fisheries biologist at Blue Leaf Environmental, an environmental contracting company in Ellensburg. So far she’s been working with fish on the Columbia River and the Snake River.</p><p>“I got to catch a seven-and-a-half foot sturgeon,” Martin beamed. “They’re kind of sharkish.”</p><p>CWU biology professor Paul James has known Martin for many years. She went to school with his son and daughter.</p><p>“When she was a little girl, she was fascinated with sharks and talked about them all the time,” James said, adding that Martin is an excellent student who always wants to learn more and more about biology and ecology.</p><p><strong>Field experience</strong></p><p>Martin took a field course taught by James at a marine biology station in Hawaii.</p><p>“She was definitely the hardest working student on the trip,” James said. “I was so impressed with Kelsey, both in the classroom and in the field, that I hired her to help with our I-90 wildlife crossing study as well as another study looking at fish passage through streams in Ellensburg.”</p><p>Over spring break, Martin took another week-long biology field course in southern Mexico, where she investigated biodiversity and geology of tide pools in coastal Jalisco.</p><p>After the course, Martin headed to Mazatlan where she gave a presentation at the annual meeting of the Western Division of the American Fisheries Society. The talk focused on a project she worked on with James about the possibility of reintroducing steelhead and coho into Ellensburg’s Wilson and Reecer creeks.</p><p>Martin earned the 2014 College of the Sciences Award for Student Achievement in Biological Sciences.</p><p>“I was not the faculty member who nominated Kelsey for the student of distinction award because another faculty member beat me to it,” James said. “That should tell you how she was able to impress everyone in our department.”</p><p>Knowing that multiple biology professors nominated her for the award means a great deal, Martin said.</p><p>“They’re all people I really respect,” she said. “There’s something about going to a smaller school like Central. You really get to know your professors.”</p><p>Martin plans to go back to school for an advanced degree and has been looking into universities that have shark labs.</p><p><em><strong>PHOTO: </strong>Recent CWU graduate Kelsey Martin, a fisheries biologist for Blue Leaf Environmental, is pictured working on the Columbia River near the McNary Dam in May 2014.</em></p><p>Media contact: Barb Arnott, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-2841, barnott@cwu.edu</p><p>June 11, 2014</p>Natural Science Seminar: Human Responses to the Last Glacial Maximum in the Transbaikal 6/6 4:00pm SCIE 147http://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2631Tue, 03 Jun 2014 11:47:42<p>Please come join us THIS FRIDAY for the final Natural Science Seminar of Spring 2014!&nbsp; It will be held June 6th at 4:00pm-5:00pm in Science 147.</p><p>Dr. Ian Buvit, the CWU McNair Program Director, will be sharing his scholarship on "Human Responses to the Last Glacial Maximum in the Transbaikal (Southern Siberia)."&nbsp; Globally, humans reacted to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (22-18 ka) in different ways. In Siberia, Buvit finds clear shifts in technology and social organization. He will discuss the environmental conditions of the LGM in the Transbaikal region, and the archaeological evidence of how humans coped in one of the most challenging places on Earth, during one of the most disruptive times in the history of our existence.</p><p>The Natural Science Seminar Series talks are open to everyone.&nbsp; The series is sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences and the College of the Sciences. Visitor parking permits are available to community members who would like to attend.&nbsp; Please contact the Biological Sciences Dept. at (509) 963-2731 by 12:00pm on the day of the seminar to make arrangements.</p>CWU Biologist One of Few Studying Night Snakeshttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2630Wed, 28 May 2014 15:43:53<p><img alt="" src="/biology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.biology/files/Robert_Weaver.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; margin: 5px; float: right;">By MARGO MASSEY, Daily Record</p><p>While some people shy away from snakes, reptiles and spiders, Robert Weaver makes a point of seeking them out.</p><p>His interest in snakes and reptiles started when he was 5 years old and living outside of Kennewick.</p><p>“Walking home one day from school with a bunch of kids, we found a dead gopher snake,” Weaver said. “I picked it up, it was dead, I didn’t care. I showed it to my mom and she was really scared so I knew I found something really cool.”</p><p>It was an interest that would carry through to adulthood.</p><p>Weaver, a biology lecturer at Central Washington University, is a herpetologist focusing on a species called night snakes that can be found from British Columbia to Mexico. He is one of two people in the world studying the snakes.</p><p>Read the <a href="http://www.dailyrecordnews.com/members/cwu-professor-one-of-few-biologists-in-the-world-studying/article_72b9d9aa-e67e-11e3-a17e-001a4bcf887a.html?mode=image&amp;photo=1" target="_blank">rest of the story</a> in the Daily Record.</p><p><em><strong>PHOTO: </strong>Robert Weaver holds a desert night snake in his office at CWU. (Brian Myrick / Daily Record)</em></p>Natural Science Seminar: "A Structural Biology Approach Enables The Development Of Antimicrobials Targeting Bacterial Immunophilins"http://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2628Wed, 21 May 2014 14:09:54<p>You won't want to miss the upcoming guest speaker for the Natural Science Seminar Series at CWU!</p><p>Spencer Moen (CWU Alumnus) will present on his work at the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease [SSGCID].&nbsp; Please join us for <strong>"A Structural Biology Approach Enables The Development of Antimicrobials Targeting Bacterial Immunophilins" this Friday, May 23rd, at 4:00 in Science 147.</strong></p><p>Everyone is welcome to attend!&nbsp; The Natural Science Seminar Series is sponsored by the CWU Department of Biological Sciences and the College of the Sciences.</p><p>Visitor parking permits are available to community members who would like to attend.&nbsp; Please contact the Biological Sciences Department at 963-2731 by 12:00 on the day of the seminar to make arrangements.</p><p>We hope to see you there!</p>Highways & Wildlife: Lessening the Impacts of I-90http://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2627Tue, 13 May 2014 10:43:52<p>Dr. Kris Ernest is presenting Thursday, May 22nd on wildlife issues along I-90 near Snoqualmie Pass.&nbsp; She will speak on effects of highways on wildlife, structures to improve wildlife crossing, ways wildlife are monitored near the highway, and what has been learned from five years of research.&nbsp;</p><p>The talk will be held at 6:00pm in the Oddfellows, 307 N. Pine St., Ellensburg.</p>Psyllids and Microbes, Friends or Foes? May 9th at 4:00http://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2623Wed, 07 May 2014 09:36:52<p>Come join us for <strong>Psyllids and Microbes: Friends or Foes?</strong>, a Natural Science Seminar that proves to be a fascinating look at bacteria of the genus Wolbachia that infect insects.&nbsp; Dr. Rodney Cooper, Research Entomologist for the Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory, will explain his current research on the effects of Wolbachia among several haplotypes of the potato psyllid and possible applications to control the pest.</p><p>The seminar will be held this Friday, May 9th in Science 147.&nbsp; Refreshments are served at 3:50 and the seminar is from 4:00-5:00.&nbsp; All are welcome to attend!&nbsp; The Natural Science Seminar Series is sponsored by the CWU Biological Sciences Department and the College of the Sciences. Visitor parking permits are available to community members who would like to attend.&nbsp; Please contact the Biological Sciences Dept. at 963-2731 by 12:00 on the day of the seminar to make arrangements.</p>Monitoring Native Deer, Elk, and Moose Populations in Washington -- Natural Science Seminarhttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2617Tue, 22 Apr 2014 13:51:19<p>Please join us this Friday for a Natural Science Seminar presentation on "Monitoring Native Deer, Elk and Moose Populations in Washington:&nbsp; Methods and Sampling Strategies."&nbsp; Dr. Scott McCorquodale, Deer and Elk Specialist, will be our guest speaker for this talk.&nbsp; He is the Acting Regional Wildlife Program Manager at the Washington State Department of Fish &amp; Wildlife.</p><p>The talk will be held April 25th in the Science Building, Room 147, from 4:00-5:00.&nbsp; Refreshments will be served at 3:50.</p><p>The Natural Science Seminar Series is sponsored by the CWU Biological Sciences Department and the College of the Sciences.&nbsp; The series is open to all who are interested in attending these informative talks followed by lively discussion.&nbsp; Visitor parking permits are available to community members who would like to attend.&nbsp; Please contact the CWU Biological Sciences Dept. at 963-2731 by 12:00pm on the day of the seminar to make arrangements.</p>Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Fusion Natural Science Seminarhttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2614Thu, 17 Apr 2014 12:02:08<p>Please come join us Wednesday, April 23rd, for another illuminating talk in the Natural Science Seminar Series!&nbsp;&nbsp; We will hear from Dr. Derek Ricketson, Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California Davis on "Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Fusion".&nbsp; The seminar will be held in Science 101 from 4:00-5:00.&nbsp; Refreshments will be served at 3:50.</p><p>See <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/biology/natural-science-seminars">http://www.cwu.edu/biology/natural-science-seminars</a> for information on upcoming events.</p><p>All are welcome!&nbsp; The Natural Sciences Seminar Series is sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences and the College of the Sciences. Visitor parking permits are available to community members who would like to attend.&nbsp; Please contact the Biological Sciences Department at 963-2731 by 12:00 on the day of the seminar to make arrangements.</p>CWU Receives More Than $600,000 to Increase Diversity in the Scienceshttp://www.cwu.edu/biology/node/2612Tue, 15 Apr 2014 09:06:44<p><img alt="" src="/biology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.biology/files/images/solver_logo.jpg" style="width: 340px; height: 320px;"></p><p>More than 25, two-year scholarships in the amount of $20,000 will become available to academically talented students majoring in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) discipline, thanks to a new program at Central Washington University.</p><p>Professors Audrey Huerta, geological sciences, and Alison Scoville biological sciences, received $612,840 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their five-year program, SOLVER (Sustainability for Our Livelihood, Values, Environment, and Resources). They will receive $64,018 for scholarships this year. The deadline for this year’s applications is May 15. Students can apply at www.cwu.edu/solver.</p><p>“Our goal is to substantially increase the success of traditionally underrepresented minorities in these high-demand fields,” said Huerta. “Five scholarships will be awarded this year, and we are seeking applicants for them now.”</p><p>The overall objective of SOLVER is to increase the quality and diversity of students graduating with bachelor’s degrees in the STEM fields, with an emphasis on recruitment, retention, and graduation of Hispanic and Native American students. The SOLVER program will provide scholars with financial, academic, personal, and professional support.</p><p>“We plan to develop instructional materials and resources that will enhance the established curriculum,” noted Scoville. “We will focus on educational best practices that are particularly powerful for underrepresented minorities and can be tailored to fit the needs of these particular populations.”</p><p>In particular, the program will employ six high-impact practices that increase both student persistence and achievement: a learning community organized around a fundamental issue (sustainability), common intellectual experiences within this community, diversity learning, undergraduate research opportunities, academic service learning, and internships.</p><p>These practices will be coupled with strong student support, including targeted recruiting and application assistance, community and family involvement, individualized academic counseling, faculty and peer mentoring, tutoring, career development, and leadership training.</p><p>The SOLVER program will strengthen ties between CWU and local Hispanic and Native American communities, train CWU faculty mentors in cultural responsiveness and student support services, and make the CWU community generally more aware of regional diversity through campus-wide events. For more information, go to www.cwu.edu/solver.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu</p><p>&nbsp;</p>