CWUAnthropology NewsAnthropology Newshttp://www.cwu.edu/anthropology/newsen-usCWU Grad Picked for Smithsonian Museum Internshiphttp://www.cwu.edu/anthropology/node/2487Thu, 26 Jun 2014 11:47:55<p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="Hanna Person" src="/anthropology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.anthropology/files/Firefighter_gloves_January_2014_1.jpg" style="width: 440px; height: 293px; margin: 5px;"></p><p>Hanna Person, who graduated this month from Central Washington University with a degree in anthropology, is headed to Washington, DC for a paid summer internship at the <a href="http://naturalhistory.si.edu/" target="_blank">Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of Natural History</a>.</p><p>Person, who’s always been a natural history buff, chose CWU because of its anthropology program and museum studies minor and because she wanted to attend a small school. In addition to her classes, Person participated in a five-day field course at Mount Rainier and assisted in multiple exhibit installations at CWU’s <a href="http://www.cwu.edu/museum/" target="_blank">Museum of Culture and Environment</a>. She says the experiences helped her land the Smithsonian internship, as did the great recommendation from Mark Auslander, professor of anthropology and museum studies and director of the CWU museum.</p><p>“She's extremely hard working, very creative, and takes a good deal of initiative,” Auslander said about Person. When he learned the Smithsonian might be looking for an intern to help organize its Rastafarian collection, he didn’t hesitate to recommend Person to Jake Homiak, director of the collections and archives program at the Museum of Natural History.</p><p>“Internships like this at the Smithsonian are extremely competitive, but my museum studies colleagues and I had no doubt that Hanna would be a very strong candidate,” Auslander said. “We are just thrilled for Hanna.”</p><p>Person will help register and accession the museum's collection of global Rastafarian material culture, working under Homiak, a noted scholar of Afro-Caribbean religions.</p><p><strong>'A quiet adventure'</strong></p><p>“I realize that, for most people, being in the back room and handling the objects is pretty boring. But for me it’s interesting,” Person said. “It’s a little mystery. You’re learning about the object, you’re handling it; it’s like a treasure hunt. A quiet adventure.”</p><p>Person was an intern at CWU’s Museum of Culture and Environment under collections manager Lynn Bethke, who said Person’s work and the work of other interns is vital to the operation of the museum.</p><p>“Hanna is a great student—always ready to take on new challenges, but also detail oriented; great attributes for anyone interested in museums,” Bethke said.</p><p>Person helped in multiple CWU exhibit installations, “writing text, mounting panels, installing objects, and doing all of the many little things that go into making an exhibit come to life,” Bethke said. “She also did a great deal of work processing a collection of baskets from the Philippines which was donated to us in 2012.”</p><p>The Museum of Natural History is right on the National Mall in the heart of the capital. Person hopes to visit as many museums as she can during her six-week stay in Washington, DC, and expects the experience to give her a better feel for museum collection and help her decide what sort of graduate studies she wants to take part in.</p><p>Person is a 2012 graduate of La Center High School and, thanks to Running Start, finished her four-year degree at CWU in just two years.</p><p><em><strong>PHOTO: </strong>Recent CWU graduate Hanna Person is pictured in the past exhibit "Where there's Smoke ... Living with Fire," at the Museum of Culture and Environment. T<em>he exhibit borrowed g</em>ear worn by wilderness firefighters <em>from the state Department of Natural Resources</em>. Person says her experience working at the CWU museum helped her land a paid internship at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC this summer.</em></p><p><strong>Media contact: </strong>Barb Arnott, CWU Public Affairs, 509-963-2841, <a href="mailto:barnott@cwu.edu">barnott@cwu.edu</a></p><p>June 25, 2014</p>CWU Primate Behavior Program Signs MOU with Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwesthttp://www.cwu.edu/anthropology/node/2486Mon, 03 Feb 2014 10:19:32<p><img alt="" src="/anthropology/sites/cts.cwu.edu.anthropology/files/images/Burrito_play_bow_playface_deck_GH_ek_small.jpg" style="width: 480px; height: 320px;"></p><p>Central Washington University’s Primate Behavior and Ecology (PBE) academic programs are thriving despite the relocation of chimpanzees Tatu and Loulis to a sanctuary in Montreal. CWU and <a href="https://www.chimpsanctuarynw.org">Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest (CSNW)</a>, in Cle Elum, have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that allows CWU students to receive credits while being trained at their facility, which is home to seven chimpanzees. There will be no cost to CWU.</p><p>“We’re really tickled,” said Lori Sheeran, PBE director and anthropology professor. “When we knew that the CHCI [Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute] chimpanzees were leaving, we began talking to the people at CSNW about letting our students become involved.”</p><p>The university and sanctuary already have close ties. Co-director John Mulcahy and several staff members are CWU graduates, and trained at CHCI, so there is considerable overlap in ideologies and methodologies. Diana Goodrich, the other director, was the executive assistant at Fauna Foundation, the sanctuary where the CWU chimpanzees now reside. CSNW is only about 30 miles from the CWU’s Ellensburg campus, making it an easy commute for students.</p><p>The MOU allows the primate behavior program to offer another venue for training in animal caregiving and environmental enrichment. Sheeran notes that students in the primate behavior program have many opportunities to work with nonhuman primates, adding “CHCI was one resource, among many.”</p><p>“This training is vital to our students’ abilities to compete for jobs in zoos, sanctuaries, and to prepare for fieldwork,” said Sheeran. “The MOU allows our undergraduate and graduate students to learn safe and humane caregiving practices while earning course credits.</p><p>“Our students are noted worldwide for their abilities to work with chimpanzees, who are sensitive, intelligent, and challenging creatures,” she continued. “The experience of working around nonhuman primates, plus the program coursework, gives them an undeniable edge.”</p><p>In addition, PBE students can conduct research and complete internships at Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo, the Molecular Anthropology Lab at CWU, or study abroad at the Mt. Huangshan, China macaque sanctuary. Sheeran also recently developed a research agreement with a gibbon conservation center in southern California that will provide several internships annually. Students also can continue to study chimpanzee sign language and communication at CWU using archival data.</p><p>For more information about PBE go to www.cwu.edu/primate.</p><p>CSNW was founded in 2003 to provide sanctuary for chimpanzees discarded from the entertainment and biomedical testing industries. It is located on a 26-acre farm in the Cascade Mountains, 90 miles east of Seattle. It is one of only a handful of sanctuaries in the United States that cares for chimpanzees. For more information about CSNW, go to www.chimpsanctuarynw.org.</p><p>All photos are courtesy of the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest.</p><p>Media Contact: Valerie Chapman-Stockwell, Public Affairs, 509-963-1518, valeriec@cwu.edu<br>&nbsp;</p>Fire and Its Impact on the Pacific Northwest Discussed at MCEhttp://www.cwu.edu/anthropology/node/2479Tue, 05 Nov 2013 10:22:47<p>Thunderstorms, dry summers, and Native American land management have affected the frequency of fire and its effect on the area we live in, according to Megan Walsh, Central Washington University geography professor. Walsh will present “Climatic and Human Influences on the Fire History of the Pacific Northwest,” at 5:30 p.m., November 7 in Dean Hall at the Museum of Culture and Environment at CWU.</p><p>This event is free and open to the public and is held in conjunction with MCE’s new exhibit, Where There’s Smoke . . . Living with Fire. For more information go to http://www.cwu.edu/museum.</p><p>Parking at CWU is free after 4:30 p.m. and on weekends, excepted in specially designated spaces (handicapped, loading) or lots assigned to residence halls.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Media Contact: Elizabeth Bollwerk, Museum of Culture and Environment, 509-963-2313, bollwerke@cwu.edu</p>